Study: Being compassionate to your spouse is rewarding in and of itself

first_imgPinterest Share LinkedIn We’ve all heard that it’s better to give than to receive. Now there’s empirical evidence to show that being compassionate to a spouse is rewarding in and of itself.Psychologists have found that the emotional benefits of compassionate acts are significant for the giver, whether or not the recipient is even aware of the act. For example, if a husband notices that the windshield on his wife’s car is covered with snow, he may scrape it off before driving to work. That gesture would boost his emotional well-being, regardless of whether his wife notices.Harry Reis, a professor of psychology at the University of Rochester, led a research team that studied 175 North American newlywed husbands and wives who were married an average of 7.17 months. The results have been published in the journal Emotion. Share on Facebookcenter_img Share on Twitter Email “Our study was designed to test a hypothesis put forth by Tenzin Gyatso, the current Dalai Lama,” said Reis, “that compassionate concern for others’ welfare enhances one’s own affective state.”The team of psychologists, which included Ronald Rogge of Rochester and Michael Maniaci of Florida Atlantic University, asked participants to keep a two-week daily diary to record those instances in which either spouse put aside personal wishes in order to meet the partner’s needs. But the researchers also needed to assess the emotional well-being of the individuals. To that end, the participants kept track of their daily emotional states for each day based on 14 positive and negative terms–such as enthusiastic, happy, calm, sad, angry, and hurt.Over the course of the 14 days, husbands and wives reported giving and receiving an average of .65 and .59 compassionate acts each day–with husbands perceiving more such acts than did their partners. The acts included such things as changing personal plans for the partner’s sake, doing something that showed the partner was valued, and expressing tenderness for the spouse.Before the study, the researchers predicted that the greatest impact on the donor would come when the act was recognized by the recipient, because recognition would make the donor feel valued. They also thought the recipient would feel the most benefit when the act was mutually recognized, as opposed to those times when one partner perceived a compassionate act that wasn’t actually intended. While those predictions were confirmed, the researchers discovered something else.“Clearly, a recipient needs to notice a compassionate act in order to emotionally benefit from it,” said Reis. “But recognition is much less a factor for the donor.”The psychologists discovered that donors benefit from compassionate acts, regardless of whether the recipient explicitly notices the acts. And in those cases, the benefits for the donors was about 45 percent greater than for the recipients, as determined by the self-assessment scales in the daily diaries, with the effect being equally strong for men and women.For Reis, the results suggest that “acting compassionately may be its own reward.”Reis is now working with Rochester alum Peter Caprariello, an assistant professor of marketing at Stony Brook University, to study the emotional benefits of spending money on others. Their work suggests that spending on others can make a person feel better, but only when the goal is to benefit that person. Spending to impress them with generosity or vision doesn’t do the trick.last_img read more

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Flu activity drops across country as season ebbs

first_imgAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) latest FluView surveillance report today, influenza-like illness (ILI) activity is markedly down across the country this week, a clear sign that this year’s severe flu season continues to wind down.The percentage of outpatient visits for ILI was 3.7%, down from 5.0% the previous week. The national baseline is 2.2%. The current ILI rate is similar to what was observed at the height of the 2015-16 season.Season not over yetDespite the good ILI news, Anne Schuchat, MD, acting director of the CDC, said yesterday that more cases can be expected this season.”We cannot predict how long this season will last, and while we have started to see a decline in rates of people visiting their doctor for influenza-like illness, we expect to see several more weeks of ongoing flu activity, with continued reports of hospitalizations and flu deaths in children and adults,” Schuchat said as she testified at a hearing to the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigation on this year’s influenza season.The number of states experiencing high levels of influenza activity also dropped, to 21 from the previous week’s 32. Fifteen states had moderate flu activity, 5 states experienced low activity, and 9 states reported minimal activity.Flu was geographically widespread in 34 states and Puerto Rico. Last week the CDC reported widespread flu in 45 states and Puerto Rico.There were five pediatric deaths recorded, fewer than in previous weeks. So far this season the CDC has confirmed 119 pediatric deaths.Influenza B and A now evenThe rate of flu-related hospitalizations across the country, however, rose somewhat. The overall rate was 86.3 per 100,000 population, up slightly from the previous week’s rate of 81.7 per 100,000 people.”The overall hospitalization rate and all age-specific hospitalization rates are now higher than the end-of-season hospitalization rates for 2014-2015, a high severity, H3N2-predominant season,” the CDC said in its FluView summary.As has been typical all season, the highest rate of hospitalizations was among adults aged 65 years or older (370.6 per 100,000 population), followed by adults aged 50 to 64 (93.6 per 100,000 population) and children aged 0 to 4 years (62.5 per 100,000 population).The vast majority of hospitalizations (80.2%) were associated with influenza A virus. H3N2 was found in 85.7% of hospitalized influenza A cases, with H1N1 accounting for 14.3%.But nationally, influenza B is on the rise, as is typical in the latter part of the season. Of all specimens testing positive for flu last week, 3,090 (49.9%) were influenza A viruses and 3,103 (50.1%) were influenza B viruses. Of the influenza A viruses that were subtyped, 70.4% were H3N2 viruses and 29.6% were H1N1.”The majority of people with influenza so far this season have been infected with the H3N2 influenza virus,” Shuchat said during her testimony yesterday. “It is still too early to assess the full burden of influenza disease for this year, but estimates from recent seasons where H3N2 was predominant, like the 2012-13 and 2014-15 seasons, provide an indication of what to anticipate for this season.”CDC estimated that during seasons like those, influenza accounted for as many as 35.6 million illnesses, 16.6 million medically attended visits, 710,000 hospitalizations, and 56,000 deaths.”See also:Mar 8 CDC FluViewMar 9 CDC FluView summaryMar 8 Schuchat testimonylast_img read more

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Unite’s fund performance shows resilience of student accommodation sector

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Canadian banks balance up relocation options in City

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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NASA, University Hospitals join forces in response to Covid-19

first_imgA team of researchers recently developed and tested two new approaches that could enable health care professionals to sanitise masks on-site and safely reuse them. These approaches also may be useful to the aerospace community when traditional sterilisation techniques might not be available.“NASA strives to ensure the technology we develop for space exploration and aeronautics is broadly available to benefit the public and the nation,” said Glenn Center Director Marla Pérez-Davis, Ph.D. “If our technology can lend a hand in overcoming this crisis, we will do whatever we can to put it in the hands of those who need it.”Results of tests on both methods – atomic oxygen and peracetic acid – are promising. The atomic oxygen decontamination method currently is being evaluated and early results are favourable.Atomic oxygen methodGlenn Research Engineer Sharon Miller and Physicist Bruce Banks of SAIC developed a process and hardware to decontaminate masks using atomic oxygen. Pervasive in low-Earth orbit, these single oxygen atoms can remove organic materials that can’t easily be cleaned by other methods. Source: University HospitalsDoctors Amrita John and Shine Raju at UH Cleveland Medical Center with the device that decontaminates masks using atomic oxygen.“On Earth, we create atomic oxygen by putting ozone (O3) in a chamber and heating it,” Miller said. “As the ozone decomposes into atomic oxygen, it can kill organisms like viruses.”Further testing is needed to verify the method can be used to perform multiple decontamination cycles without damaging the PPE. Recent filtration tests performed at an independent testing laboratory showed N95 masks filter well and pass acceptance testing after 20 minutes of atomic oxygen treatment.In early May, NASA provided a prototype for UH to test on N95 masks. Early results confirm the method deactivates the virus, and continued testing will determine the minimum ozone concentration and exposure time needed for disinfection.“Ozone diffuses easily through and around objects, which makes it promising for sterilising inside an N95 mask filter or loosely stacked masks, and it could potentially sterilize without leaving a residue,” said Banks, who supports Glenn’s Environmental Effects and Coatings branch.“The process could be scaled up to treat multiple batches of PPE or made portable for small hospitals in rural areas. No liquid chemicals would be needed, just oxygen and nitrogen gas.”last_img read more

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The problem with injunctions

first_img The result is a host of players wrongly assumed in the public’s eye to be guilty of mistakes, which they have not made. My own hunch may be completely wrong, but still he is defamed in my mind at least. Injunctions, (and indeed super-injunctions which do not even allow the existence of proceedings to be mentioned), make David Cameron feel uneasy because they seem to favour the rich and famous, although in all honesty the poor and uncelebrated are unlikely to make cannon fodder for the nation’s media anyway. His argument is disputed by Carter Ruck, which often acts for those seeking to protect their reputation. The law firm argues that anyone is entitled to call on the Human Rights Act to maintain their privacy. Question marks over the rights and wrongs of the use of injunctions will continue, but for now all they achieve is the polar opposite of what they were designed to achieve. While one famous face is protected, his peers and colleagues face the unjust burden of suspicion as we all play guessing games to find the real culprit. Read Rozenberg’s take on the injunction furore. I know the name of the Premier League footballer who has taken out an injunction to prevent his private life being thrust into public consumption. Or at least, I think I know. I’ve certainly heard his name mentioned over a chat at the bar. I’ve inquisitively searched for the miscreant using a well-known search engine. I’ve even heard it chanted at one particular football ground in recent weeks. I know, but I cannot say, because an injunction prevents me from doing so. The advantage of the legal block is obvious for the footballer in question, who pays probably his weekly wage to silence the nation’s bloodthirsty tabloid press. Yet it does little to enhance the marriages of hundreds of his happily married colleagues, many of whom will have to explain away to their wives affairs they have never taken part in. What injunctions offer them is a limited game of celebrity Guess Who, in which we establish certain details (male, footballer, married) but not enough information to make a definite stab. Does he wear a hat? Has he a moustache? Does he have an unfeasibly big nose? (For anyone who remembers Guess Who, that probably leaves Dave and Andy, but Zachary is still an option.)last_img read more

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Simons Group: Lessons not learned

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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Astral Aviation eyes Europe-Africa market

first_imgThe B747-400F will operate on a twice-weekly Ostend, Belgium; Lagos, Nigeria; Port Harcourt, Nigeria; Malabo, Equatorial Guinea; Nairobi, Kenya, London Manston, UK; Ostend routeing. The freighter will provide inbound capacity for Astral Aviation’s shipments from Europe and the USA for onward connectivity to its intra-African network, as well as offering capacity for over-dimensional and heavy project shipments. The venture will also enable Astral Aviation to move perishable exports from Kenya to Europe, a market that is currently dominated entirely by foreign carriers. “We are very excited with this new venture with our long term partner and friend Astral Aviation. The Boeing 747 factory built freighter with nose loading capability means we can offer payloads of up to 120,000 kilos as well as accepting long and oversize pieces giving a new dimension to our business to and from Africa as well as the availability of ad- hoc charter capacity on a worldwide basis,” says ANA Aviation chairman, Andy Leslie. According to an Astral Aviation statement, it takes an optimistic outlook on the air freight prospects between Europe and Africa, despite a global slowdown in the air cargo sector and excess capacity in the market. The increased demand for oil and gas equipment into West Africa, as well as the growth in perishable goods from East Africa to Europe, will be the key markets targeted by the new venture.October also marks the launch of a codeshare arrangement between Emirates SkyCargo and Astral Aviation. Emirates SkyCargo’s weekly B777F service between Johannesburg and Nairobi will be marketed by Astral Aviation’s South African GSA, Network Airline Services. Astral Aviation says it will deliver a reliable service for mining and project cargoes, perishables and motor vehicles for on forwarding through its African network. www.ana-aviation.comwww.astral-aviation.comwww.skycargo.comlast_img read more

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Play ball…

first_imgAthlone Athletics pitcher Dean Jacobs in action in their Major League match against Bothasig Knights at Parktown at the weekend. Bothasig won 12-1. picture: buntu gotywalast_img

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Bar scathing over need for new AML quango

first_imgThe bar has poured further scorn on plans to set up new anti-money laundering quango, saying its members could be asked to foot the bill for a body that is irrelevant to most of their practices. The Bar Council said the ‘low-risk’ profile of the bar must be taken into account when determining the level of fees to pay for the Office for Professional Body Anti-Money Laundering Supervision (OPBAS), for which it is said there is ‘little justification’.‘There is no reason why a barrister who does not undertake work within the regulated sector should pay a levy to fund a body that is required because of threats posed by the activities of estate agents or accountants,’ the council said in its response to a consultation. OPBAS is being set up by the Financial Conduct Authority to oversee the adequacy of supervisory arrangements at 22 professional bodies. These include the Law Society and Bar Council. Each body will be charged a fee to cover the office’s running costs.The Law Society has already lambasted the scheme, saying that practising certificate fees would have to rise to foot the bill, which the FCA says could be between £15 and £25 per regulated individual. The FCA proposes to charge a fee of £5,000 from bodies applying to be added to the list of organisations under the body’s oversight, along with a ‘fairly distributed’ annual fee. Its ‘working assumption’ is that OPBAS will need to recover £2.5m in 2018/19 and 2019/20 and £2m per year from 2020/21 onwards.However, the Bar Council said no justification or breakdown had been given for the proposed costs and, echoing the Law Society, called for a full consultation on OPBAS’ strategy, business plan and final fee level.‘Given their size, a detailed cost breakdown must be made available so that those bodies who are being asked to foot the bill can analyse it and provide input into the necessity of the resources that they are being charged for,’ the council said. ‘No public body is entitled to levy a fee upon persons given no option but to pay it without providing proper transparency in respect of that fee.’The bar’s response also pointed out that the majority of self-employed barristers do not undertake work within the scope of money laundering regulations. It added that ‘there are no historic examples in the public domain of barristers engaging in money laundering or terrorist financing activities on behalf of their clients’.The FCA is expected to publish feedback and final rules on fees in February or March.last_img read more

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