Edward Symmons in senior management shake-up

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Jaguar races to Bruntwood’s Neo for new engineering centre

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NPD Gives Green Light for Gullfaks Subsea Boost

first_imgThe Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) has granted the licensees of Gullfaks Sør consent for start-up and operation of new subsea wet gas compressor and umbilical on the Gullfaks field in production licence 050.The Gullfaks project is the second major seabed gas compression project that will be initiated, after the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate granted consent for the start-up of Åsgard subsea compression in July 2015.“Technology development is a key to improved recovery and extended lifetime for fields on the Norwegian shelf,” says principal engineer Astri Fritsen of the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate.“For Gullfaks, this gas compression means extended lifetime and an increase in the gas recovery rate from Gullfaks Sør Brent from 62 to 74 per cent.”The compressor station and the umbilical installed on the seabed on Gullfaks will push the well stream from templates D, L, M, and N up. Production is scheduled to start no later than October of this year.In addition to accelerating gas production and extending the period when the gas capacity on the Gullfaks C facility is utilised, the new infrastructure will increase the gas and condensate reserves from the reservoirs on Gullfaks Sør Brent and Rimfaks Brent. This also enables the realisation of additional resources in the greater Gullfaks area.According to Fritsen, the technology can be used on other new and existing fields in the future.last_img read more

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Choosing the right judges

first_img In Radmacher v Granatino [2010] UKSC 42, the recent decision of the Supreme Court on pre-nuptial agreements, the court decided the appeal by a majority of eight to one in such a way as might normally be expected to benefit husbands rather than wives. But it just so happened on the facts of the particular case that, exceptionally, the beneficiary of the decision was a wife. The eight judges in the majority were all men; the one judge in the minority was a woman. Once again, the purpose of this article is not to suggest that there is anything wrong with the decision of the majority. But can it be right that a decision of this magnitude, determining a question of great interest to members of the public whose opinions may very well be divided according to their gender, should have been heard by a court largely composed of male judges? Many will argue that this is merely because there are more male judges than female judges. But that is not an answer to the objection. How are lawyers to expect members of the public to accept the rule of law when decisions have the appearance of having been made on gender lines? To restore public confidence in judicial decision-making more thought needs to be given to who are the right judges to hear particular cases. There is no reason why this cannot be achieved within the courts service by the adoption of transparent listing guidelines and better information relating to the experience and personal interests of individual members of the judiciary. Getting this right will obviate the wasted costs of challenges to judicial decisions which have the appearance of being incompetent or biased, and enable the English courts to retain their reputation for fair and high-quality decision-making. Registering interest Legal lottery Surely there should be an obligation on all senior judges to disclose information which would give rise to issues of apparent bias, so that the listing officers would know not to assign a case to that judge in which particular parties, solicitors or counsel are involved. A suitable way to do this would be to maintain a register in a similar way to that in which members of parliament are required to disclose personal interests. Not every situation can be covered by advance disclosure, but it is at least a start. A member of the public observing some of the exchanges between counsel and the judge in Howell would be shocked that anyone could think it possible for the judge to try the case in those circumstances. Such situations should not be allowed to occur again. In Kookmin Bank v Rainy Sky SA and Others [2010] EWCA Civ 582, the Court of Appeal heard an appeal from the Commercial Court in a case involving advance payment guarantees relating to shipbuilding contracts. The lineup in the Court of Appeal was one former Commercial Court judge, one former Chancery Division judge and one former Family Division judge. The commercial judge delivered a classic commercial judgment including the citation of pure commercial authorities such as The Antaios in support of a commercial construction of the contract. The chancery judge adopted a modern approach to construction of the contract without reference to the commerciality or uncommerciality of particular constructions. The family judge delivered a four-sentence judgment beginning: ‘I find myself in the invidious position of expressing a decisive opinion in a field that is completely foreign.’ He sided with the chancery judge. The purpose of this article is not to question the correctness of the decision. But can it be right that an appeal from a Commercial Court judgment is ultimately decided by a judge whose expertise is largely confined to family law? Justice must not only be done but must manifestly be seen to be done. Even if the decision is correct, what message does this send to the general public about the way in which the decision was made? Mark Humphries is a solicitor-advocate and senior director of Mark Humphries Legal. He spent 23 years at Linklaters, latterly as a partner and head of advocacy in Londoncenter_img At the very least, the public is entitled to expect that the law will be administered by those who have sufficient expertise. Without that expertise, the rule of law becomes little more than a lottery. It is particularly interesting that when Kookmin was reported in TradeWinds, it was not the result that was greeted with the most consternation but the way in which the decision had been made. But it is not just the expertise of the judge that should be taken for granted. A judge must also be completely independent of the parties to the dispute, otherwise the fairness of the decision will be open to question. In Howell and Others v Lees Millais and Others [2007] EWCA Civ 720, with echoes of the notorious debacle in the House of Lords in Pinochet, a judge was asked to recuse himself due to his previous dealings with one of the firms of solicitors involved in the case, to which the judge had allegedly showed disappointment and even animosity. He refused, and the Court of Appeal decided that he ought to have recused himself because a fair-minded and informed observer would conclude that the judge was biased against the solicitors. But how could such a situation have been allowed to arise? Appearances matter There are many mysterious features of the legal world that baffle clients. But there is perhaps none quite so surprising as when they discover that the judge about to hear their case has little experience in the field of law with which their case is concerned. Recorders – the first rung on the judicial ladder for senior judges – are often selected from the ranks of experienced civil and commercial practitioners, but they are then expected to try criminal cases in the Crown court with only minimal training. Similarly, life-long criminal or family lawyers promoted to the Court of Appeal are expected, by little more than osmosis, to get to grips with civil and commercial cases way outside their comfort zones. In days gone by, this was not considered an issue. Judges were selected purely on the basis of their quality as advocates and, so it was thought, quality advocates could turn their skills to any field of law. But lawyers are no longer the general practitioners they once were. As the law has developed to become increasingly complex and specialist, lawyers have followed suit and are now more specialised than they have ever been. Today it is by no means unusual for a lawyer to practise in one particular field for an entire career of 30 or more years before applying to become a judge. Why, therefore, do we continue to expect these specialists to transform themselves overnight into generalists when they are selected to become senior judges? Is this not the legal equivalent of asking cardiologists and oncologists to turn their hands to general surgery? And even if a judge has the requisite experience to try a case, what steps are taken to ensure that the judge is independent of the parties to the case and has no connection with other aspects of the case which might otherwise become a source of embarrassment? These are important questions, yet very little is known by the general public about how judges are selected to hear particular cases. A number of recent cases have highlighted the need for a transparent process to: ensure that judges who are asked to try cases are competent to hear them; check whether the particular requirements of the case disqualify certain judges from trying them; and, most importantly, to enable litigants and their advisers to have confidence that an open and fair process has been used to select the right judge for the case. Foreign fieldslast_img read more

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Time to rein back enhancements to office buildings

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Safmarine appoints Ben Line

first_imgAccording to Hu Ke, Safmarine’s head of MPV in Asia, Ben Line Agencies are well known in the Asian breakbulk and project cargo communities.The company will be providing Safmarine’s Asia-West Africa service with specialised local sales and customer service and operational support, including local port agencies and offshore support for the tonnage deployed. In 2008, Safmarine commenced its MPV Services between Far East and West Africa ports, carrying containerised, conventional and multipurpose vessel cargo on the same ships. The company says that its recent investment in new vessels with heavy lift capacity and modern design, will take this ASIWAF MPV service to a new level. The service coverage will extend from China to Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and other countries in the Far East. Ben Line Agencies is a privately-owned company whose core business is shipping agency. The company’s history and business interests in Asia date back to the 19th century. With over 150 years of experience in the shipping industry, Ben Line Agencies has established a network of over 90 offices across 15 countries. Ben Line will be providing Safmarine’s ASIWAF MPV customers with liner services together with an extensive range of related operational services, including local port agencies and offshore support for the new tonnage.last_img read more

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Regauging pushes ahead

first_imgINAUGURATING broad-gauge services on the reconstructed line between Mangalore and Kabakaputtur, Indian Railways Minister Nitish Kumar announced on December 28 that trains would be running on the whole Bangalore – Mangalore corridor by January 1 2005.Construction of the 166 km new line between Bangalore and Hassan has been completed (RG 6.02 p322), along with regauging from Hassan to Sakleshpur. The minister expected regauging of the line between Kabakaputtur and Subramanya to be finished in March, with the Sakleshpur – Subramanya gap to be closed by the end of this year. At this point the route into Mangalore will be transferred from the South Western Railway to the Southern, he said.Gauge conversion on the Hassan – Mangalore line at a cost of Rs3·1bn is being funded by Karnataka state through the public-private K-RIDE Corp. In December IR confirmed that another special purpose vehicle has been formed to fund conversion of the 313 km Gandhidham – Bhildi – Palanpur line in Gujarat at a cost of Rs45·4bn. Under a memorandum of understanding signed in January, Kandla Port Trust is to take a 26% stake in the Kutch Railway Co and Gujarat Adani Ports Ltd 20%; IR will hold 50% and the state government 4%. Due to be completed by January 2006, the line will connect the ports of Kandla and Mundhra on the Gulf of Kutch with Western Railway’s Delhi – Ahmedabad main line. On December 13 Gujarat’s Chief Minister Narendra Modi inaugurated the 67 km Mundhra – Alipur line, built by Adani Corp to connect its port to the IR network.last_img read more

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7 unlikely foods that sabotage fat loss

first_imgThe basic idea behind fat loss is simple: eat better, exercise more. However, hidden in this formula are numerous caveats and footnotes. No wonder there are so many books and television specials about the 100 different ways people are supposed to exercise and eat right.According to Becca Hurt, MS, RD, and program manager of Life Time Weight Loss at Life Time – The Healthy Way of Life Company, “one of the most confusing parts of dieting is the fact that many of the foods people think will help them lose weight actually pack on the pounds.” Hurt notes there are enemies lurking in common foods that almost everyone eats or drinks. So, what’s to be done? To help identify some of the most common weight-loss enemies, Hurt has provided a list of seven culprits everyone will want to weed out of their diet.Coffee shop drinksNever mind the french fries and potato chips, Hurt says that liquid calories are more often one of the biggest downfalls when it comes to losing weight. For many, it starts with their morning coffee. While 1-2 cups of coffee with only cream added is no harm, the danger is in the sugar loaded, caramel-chocolate dieting disasters many people believe to be perfectly healthy because they ordered the non-fat options.Skim milk“Only recently, Americans started to realize fat isn’t always the bad guy,” explains Hurt. “There is no difference in fat loss between diets with no-fat and full-fat dairy consumption, according to recent studies.” In fact, Hurt notes that people often add sugar to enhance the taste of their skim milk, which quickly turns it into a decidedly unhealthy option.PastaYes, even whole grain pasta is stripped of beneficial nutrients, bleached and loaded with preservatives to make it more shelf-stable. Pasta portions can also be confusing. “A pasta meal should begin with a big salad, and the high protein meatballs should be larger than the portion of pasta,” says Hurt. “Instead of spaghetti and meatballs, it should be meatballs with some spaghetti on the side.”Reduced fat snacks For many, reduced fat, no fat and low fat labels on foods can be a green light to what they believe is guilt free snacking. The principle to remember here is not all calories are the same. “A 100-calorie pudding pack is not as healthy as 100-calories worth of almonds,” explains Hurt. “Food that is naturally healthy doesn’t have to have the “no-fat” label.” A handful of nuts, a few slices of full-fat cheese or some Greek yogurt are healthier options by far.Energy drinksFor those looking to shed some fat, drinking one of these sugar-loaded bad-boys means putting the brakes on their body’s fat burning process. Hurt adds that people should get no more than 5 percent of their calories from sugar and just one energy drink will put someone well over this limit.SandwichesWhile many think ordering a sandwich is a diet-friendly alternative to a burger, consider this: one sandwich has as many carbohydrates as a Kit-Kat bar! “Carbs are not a sustainable source of energy,” says Hurt, “and are responsible for that sluggish, hungry feeling that leads many to skip workouts and snack more.” The solution: ditch the bread and add a salad!Protein barsThey might be marketed as the fat burning, muscle gaining snack, but don’t be fooled. Heavily processed protein bars are loaded with sugars and carbohydrates. To get the necessary protein, Hurt suggests looking to nuts or animal sources such as meats or yogurt instead.Brandpointcontent.comlast_img read more

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Anritsu to Provide Calibration and Verification Test Solutions to Broadcom WLAN and Bluetooth Customers

first_imgAnritsu announced it has entered in to a Manufacturing Test License (MTL) agreement with Broadcom Corporation. Anritsu’s modular MT8870A Universal Wireless Test Set enables cellular, wireless connectivity, location-based services (LBS), and other technologies to be tested using a single solution. Through the MTL agreement, Anritsu will provide certified calibration and verification test solutions to Broadcom WLAN and Bluetooth customers.The Broadcom® Manufacturing Test License agreement is a license and validation program, providing test equipment vendors with access to Broadcom WLAN and Bluetooth software tools and Broadcom technical support resources. The program is designed to provide Broadcom OEM customers with validated test systems that reduce time-to-market and improve manufacturing efficiency and product quality. Through the MTL program, OEMs can accelerate market introduction of their Broadcom-based 5G WiFi solutions.In todays market, a significant number of mobile devices incorporate Broadcom WLAN and Bluetooth chipsets. With Anritsu joining the Broadcom MTL program, customers will now have the option of using a single instrument to verify wireless connectivity along with other radios in production. Through the MTL program, customers with separate, optimized test stations have the freedom to standardize on a single instrument, such as the MT8870A, across multiple types of wireless test stations to further streamline operations. The MT8870A can also be redeployed from one station type to another, allowing wireless device manufactures to adapt to changes in product mix over time.Anritsu’s MT8870A is well suited for the MTL program and operates from 10 MHz to 6 GHz with 160 MHz bandwidth. It has the performance to address current test challenges, while also meeting the requirements for next-generation designs. New wireless standards can be added with a software update. Four RF test ports per TRx module allow the MT8870A to support up to 16 RF connections or four 4×4 true MIMO devices.last_img read more

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