Pathological narcissism linked to sexual assault perpetration in college, study finds

first_imgEmail Pinterest LinkedIn Almost 20 percent of college men have committed some kind of sexual assault, and 4 percent have committed rape, according to a study published by University of Georgia researchers who were examining the link between different kinds of narcissism and the perpetration of sexual assaults.The study found a strong connection between pathological narcissism and sexual assault perpetration through a survey of 234 male university students, mostly in their first and second years of college. Its findings related to perpetration rates were mostly consistent with previous studies, said the study’s lead author Emily Mouilso, a clinical assistant professor in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences’ psychology department.People who demonstrate characteristics of pathological narcissism have difficulties when it comes to relating to others, Mouilso explained. Share on Facebookcenter_img Share Non-pathological narcissism, on the other hand, can be somewhat beneficial because it manifests in high self-esteem and makes it easier for people to shake off failures, study co-author Karen Calhoun said, explaining that it’s what some researchers call the “healthy” form of narcissism.“As we predicted, the aspects of narcissism that we thought would be related were (related)–the lack of empathy, the entitlement aspects of narcissism,” Mouilso said.What surprised them was the link between vulnerable narcissism and rape perpetration.Vulnerable narcissists express high levels of self-esteem but are actually very insecure, Mouilso said.The study found that men with vulnerable narcissistic traits were more likely to use alcohol or other date-rape drugs to incapacitate their victims, a finding that is especially concerning on a college campus, Mouilso said.“I think people don’t realize how prevalent drinking is” in colleges, said Calhoun, a professor emerita in the psychology department. “It’s not so much how much they drink total for women that makes them vulnerable; it’s how much they drink at a time, the binge drinking, the getting drunk and just not being alert and aware of their surroundings or the risks involved. That really puts women at risk.”Mouilso and Calhoun explained their results in the context of the theory that there are two general pathways that frequently lead to perpetration.“If the end product is perpetration, there’s more than one kind of profile that would make you more likely to perpetrate a sexual assault,” Mouilso said. “One of those streams is promiscuity–so people who have higher levels of sexual interest and more frequent sexual partners, they’re more OK with impersonal sex. That’s one stream of risk factors.“The second path is the hostile masculinity path. That has more to do with how you look at women, so having a hostile and angry orientation toward women in general and thinking that relationships are adversarial … it’s more about, what can I get out of this person that I want? I don’t really care all that much about what they want.”She explained that people can be high or low on factors in both of those tracks, but if a person has both of them together, it makes that person much more likely to perpetrate a sexual assault, according to current theory.Narcissists feel a sense of entitlement to anything they want, something that makes it easier for them to rationalize their aggressive and sometimes illegal behaviors, Mouilso said.Many previous studies have used incarcerated sex offenders as their sample pool, which makes it more difficult to generalize results to other populations. Mouilso and Calhoun’s sample of college men is fairly representative of large Southeastern university male populations.Often the view of college men tends to be an old-fashioned, “boys will be boys” attitude when it comes to acts of sexual aggression, Mouilso said.“I just don’t think that that’s accurate,” Mouilso said, “so this research helps to shed light on some of the commonalities in the personality profile between men who end up in prison and men who are walking around because they haven’t been caught.”The idea that most sexual assault perpetrators are strangers who grab women in dark alleyways isn’t accurate, Mouilso said.“It’s less likely to be a stranger who jumps out of the bush,” she said. “It’s more likely to be someone you know like the guy sitting next to you in your intro psych class.”The societal belief in “stranger danger” puts people at risk because they are looking for the deranged person on the corner rather than at the individuals in their lives who have much greater access and opportunity to perpetrate, the researchers said.Studies of non-incarcerated perpetrators are useful in developing prevention programs that could give women a more accurate idea of what to look out for.Although the percentage of college men who committed sexual assaults is unsettling, the findings suggest that it’s a “small percentage of men who are doing most of” the assaults, something that gives the researchers hope, Calhoun said.“If we could identify them and intervene in some way, that would give you some better hope of preventing it,” she said.The study, “Personality and Perpetration: Narcissism Among College Sexual Assault Perpetrators,” published in the journal Violence Against Women Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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What causes sleepiness when sickness strikes

first_imgShare LinkedIn These findings reveal that FLP-13 causes sleep by turning down activity in the nervous system cells that help keep an organism awake. Researchers examined genetic mutations to determine which genes cause the worms to fall asleep when FLP-13 is released. This revealed that worms with mutations that cause them to lack a receptor protein called DMSR-1 on cell surfaces do not become sleepy in response to FLP-13. This indicates that DMSR-1 is essential for FLP-13 to trigger sleep.Next experiments will target whether illness-induced sleepiness in humans and other mammals is triggered via a similar mechanism. If so, this research may be a critical step towards developing drugs to treat human fatigue associated with sickness and other conditions. Email Pinterestcenter_img Share on Twitter Share on Facebook It’s well known that humans and other animals are fatigued and sleepy when sick, but it’s a microscopic roundworm that’s providing an explanation of how that occurs, according to a study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A study published this week in eLife reveals the mechanism for this sleepiness.Working with a worm’s simple nervous system shows how a single nerve cell named ALA coordinates an organism-wide response to sickness. During sickness, cells are under stress, and organisms experience sleepiness to promote sleep and recover from the cellular stress. In the worm, this sleepiness is caused by release from the ALA neuron of FLP-13 and other neuropeptides, a group of chemicals that send signals between brain neurons.“Sleep is vitally important in helping both people and animals to recover during sickness,” said senior author David M. Raizen, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Neurology and a member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology. “Similar signaling may operate in humans and other animals to regulate sleep during sickness. These findings create a launching pad towards future research into the mechanisms for illness-induced sleepiness in humans and other organisms.”last_img read more

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Developers line up for 25 acre former Guinness brewery

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Bridgestone Hires New Vice President Of Sales

first_imgWith more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. From Tire ReviewAdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementBridgestone Americas welcomes Bryant Davis as new vice president of sales for the company’s truck, bus and retread tire business.Davis holds a bachelor’s degree in finance from the University of New Hampshire and a Master of Business Administration in finance from Babcock School of Management at Wake Forest University. Prior to joining Bridgestone, Davis had a 20-year career at PepsiCo Inc. where he eventually served as senior market director of sales and operations.“Bryant has a proven track record of driving volume and revenue growth in a highly-competitive market, and we are excited to bring his sales and leadership talents to Bridgestone,” said John Boynton, president of Bridgestone Americas’ truck, bus and retread tire business. “I am confident that Bryant will continue to evolve our sales strategies to align even tighter to the dynamic needs of our transportation customer.”,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

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Nigerian Court of Appeal Backs NLNG

first_imgThe Court of Appeal in Lagos on Monday, August 11, 2014 upheld a preliminary objection by Nigeria LNG Limited and dismissed an appeal filed by Global West Vessel Specialist Limited, challenging an earlier Federal High Court decision to continue a substantive suit over the blockade of NLNG’s jetty in Bonny, from where Nigeria LNG Limited exports cargoes of liquefied natural gas and allied products.The Appeal Court ruled that the Notice of Appeal filed by Global West was “incompetent” as contended by NLNG, having been filed without leave either of the Federal High Court or the Court of Appeal.The ruling affirms a previous one by the Federal High Court in Lagos dismissing Global West’s Notice of Preliminary Objection against a substantive suit by NLNG on the ground that Global West was a proper party to the suit.Following the refusal by the Federal High Court, Global West then proceeded to the Appellate Court to set aside the decision and stay proceedings at the lower Court pending the determination of the appeal.Nigeria LNG Limited in 2013 filed a case at the Federal High Court against the Attorney General of the Federation and Global West, seeking a judicial determination on, among other things, the legality or otherwise of certain levies sought to be imposed on NLNG by Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA), an agency of the Federal Government and the consequent blockade of NLNG vessels by NIMASA and Global West as a result of the dispute.[mappress]Press Release, August 15, 2014last_img read more

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Don’t panic: Energy market reform can work

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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BWM convention to come into force in 2017

first_imgAccording to the IMO, the BWM convention marks a landmark step towards halting the spread of invasive aquatic species, which can cause havoc for local ecosystems, affect biodiversity and lead to substantial economic loss.Under the convention’s terms, ships will be required to manage their ballast water to remove, render harmless, or avoid the uptake or discharge of aquatic organisms and pathogens within ballast water and sediments.Already under extreme financial pressure, shipowners could face significant additional costs over the next few years as a result of the convention coming into force.Equipment manufacturer Alfa Lavel has estimated that shipowners will spend EUR12 billion (USD13.4 billion) on the installation of ballast water management systems.There remains some uncertainty around the requirements for ballast water treatment systems and whether those compliant with the IMO convention will also comply with US ballast water regulation. The IMO has approved more than 50 different treatment systems, but the US Coast Guard has not approved a single one.Trade association BIMCO expressed its concern that the BWM convention will enter into force leaving shipowners without treatment systems approved for global use.”BIMCO is deeply concerned about the prospect of our members having to install treatment systems now which later may not be approved for use in US waters. This is because the US has not yet approved treatment systems that comply to its own, more stringent, national standards,” commented Lars Robert Pedersen, deputy secretary general at BIMCO.”Shipping will have to invest significantly in the installation of ballast water treatment systems by next September – only to find the investment is wasted if their system does not meet US standards.”BIMCO is also concerned that systems approved to the present IMO standards are not robust enough to ensure that systems onboard real ships perform to the regulatory requirements to treat ballast water. We therefore call upon IMO to expedite the revision of their G8 guidelines for approval of ballast water treatment systems.”www.imo.orgwww.bimco.orglast_img read more

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NHS sounds alarm over ‘disproportionate legal costs’

first_imgThe number of new claims against the health service in England fell slightly last year, the NHS Litigation Authority admitted today as the government prepares to consult on measures for NHS legal costs. However, the authority raised concerns about the ‘increasingly disproportionate’ level of legal costs, particularly in lower-value claims.The authority’s 2014-15 annual report, published today, also reveals an increase in the number of claims deemed to be without merit. ‘We are taking a more robust approach to repudiation,’ Helen Vernon (pictured below), chief executive, told the annual general meeting today. In 2014-15 more than 46% of clinical claims were resolved with no damages payment, the report reveals. The report says: ‘We have been concerned by the accuracy of some of the bills we have received and this has required us in some cases to refuse to make any offers in settlement to ensure that the bill is either withdrawn or the claim for costs assessed by the court.’ The authority said it has saved more than £107m by challenging claimants’ legal costs, leading to an average 33% reduction in bills. In 2014-15 the litigation authority received 11,497 new claims. A record total of 16,459 claims were closed in the year. The authority said that it maintained ‘soft knowledge’ on claimant solicitors, but denied any intention of creating a blacklist of firms. A triennial review of the authority is expected to report ‘in the relatively near future’, chair Ian Dilks said. Meanwhile, the Department of Health is expected to open a formal consultation on ways of cutting the NHS in England’s litigation bill this autumn. The potential introduction of costs caps was first revealed by the Gazette last month.last_img read more

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CATAF hosts free teacher membership drive

first_imgCATAF host free membership drive The Caribbean American Teachers Association of Florida (CATAF) will be hosting an official launch and free membership drive at Roun A Goosey Jamaican Restaurant in Miramar from 6 – 8pm, on June 9th.Teachers are invited to come, network and gather information about summer opportunities and how they can continue to impact the lives of children at home but abroad.Broward County Commissioner Dale Holness along with Union representatives and School Board staff, will give addresses.CATAF was founded in 2015 by Alexandra Davis, an educator and former City of Miramar Commissioner and Vice Mayor. Her vision brought together Caribbean American teachers to address some of the educational issues impacting teachers, students, parents and other stakeholders in Florida, particularly Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.The association’s mission is be a resource for both teachers and students alike by ensuring that each is equipped with the tools and the know-how to be successful.last_img read more

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February margin ensures DMC payments will surpass 2019 premium costs

first_imgDave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairymanEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.com Enrollment in the Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program isn’t scheduled to start for another couple of months, but dairy farmers participating in the program at the top margin coverage level ($9.50 per hundredweight [cwt]) on the first 5 million pounds of milk will see their premium costs covered quickly. The USDA confirmed a milk income over feed cost margin of $8.22 per cwt for February 2019, assuring an indemnity payment of about $1.28 per cwt on the monthly milk marketings for producers who select the $9.50 coverage level (Table 1). The USDA previously announced a January 2019 margin of $7.99 per cwt, yielding an indemnity payment of about $1.51 per cwt for the same producers.advertisementadvertisementThat averages out to a DMC indemnity payment of about $1.395 per cwt on January-February milk marketings for producers who select the $9.50 coverage level.Example herdTaking the calculations further, an example dairy herd with annual production history of 3 million pounds of milk and electing to cover 95 percent of that milk (2.85 million pounds) would be eligible for payments on 2,375 hundredweights per month (2.85 million pounds divided by 100 divided by 12).If protected at $9.50 per cwt, the 2,375 hundredweights would yield indemnity payments of $3,586 for January and $3,040 for February, for a total of $6,626. All indemnity payments are subject to a 6.6 percent sequestration deduction. Subtracting the sequestration deduction of about $438 for January-February, the two-month payment is about $6,189.The premium for $9.50 margin coverage is 15 cents per cwt, or $4,275 for the full year. Thus, the example dairy would see a net return – above full-year premium costs – of $1,914 in January-February alone. (Producers who sign up for the full five-year length of the DMC program are eligible for another 25 percent discount on their premium, dropping it to 11.25 cents per cwt.)advertisementMarket outlooks have been improving, but as of March 29, DMC margins were forecast to remain below $9.50 per cwt into August 2019.February milk price up slightlyThe February 2019 U.S. average milk price rose 20 cents per cwt from January to $16.80 per cwt and was $1.50 higher than February 2018. Florida’s average of $20.50 per cwt remained the nation’s high; the low was in $15 per cwt in New Mexico.Compared to a month earlier, average milk prices were slightly higher in 20 of 23 major dairy states, led by a 50-cent increase in Iowa and 40 cents in Idaho (Table 2). Compared to a year earlier, February 2019 milk prices were up at least $2 per cwt or more in Arizona, Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Virginia.What if? New ‘dairy hay’ informationIn an effort to more accurately calculate dairy farmer feed costs under federal dairy safety net programs, the 2018 Farm Bill mandated the USDA to begin reporting average “dairy quality” hay prices in the top five milk-producing states. USDA’s National Ag Statistics Service began reporting prices for Premium and Supreme alfalfa hay with the latest monthly Ag Prices report, released March 28. The report actually lists hay prices in seven states and an average for the top five: California, Idaho, New York, Texas and Wisconsin (Table 3).Based on those prices, January and February 2019 dairy quality hay prices averaged $221 and $225 per ton, respectively. That compares to $181 and $180 per ton for all alfalfa hay during the same two months.advertisementIt’s only a “what if?” scenario, but if that average of high-quality alfalfa prices was incorporated into the milk income over feed cost margin under the new DMC program, what would the impact be?First, a review. A carryover from the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy), the DMC average feed cost for each month is calculated by summing three numbers:1. the corn price per bushel times 1.0728, plus2. the soybean meal price per ton times 0.007353. the alfalfa hay price per ton times 0.0137.Under that formula, the U.S. average alfalfa hay price of $180 per ton in February creates a DMC dairy ration hay price factor of $2.47 per cwt. If the higher “dairy-quality” alfalfa hay price was used in DMC calculations, it would have raised the hay price factor another 62 cents to $3.08 per cwt.The January 2019 U.S. average alfalfa hay price of $181 per ton (DMC hay price factor of $2.48), while the dairy quality hay price averaged $221 per ton ($3.03 hay price factor), a difference of 55 cents per cwt.As noted, the USDA previously announced a January 2019 margin of $7.99 per cwt, but the higher hay price would have cut that to $7.44 per cwt. That would have translated into a January DMC payment of $2.06 per cwt for a producer insured at the $9.50 per cwt level.Similarly, using the higher hay price, the February announced margin of $8.22 per cwt would have fallen 62 cents to $7.60 per cwt, resulting in a DMC indemnity payment of $1.90 per cwt for a producer insured at the $9.50 per cwt level.To be clear, the new dairy-quality hay prices are not part of the DMC calculations. They do, however, help call attention to higher feed costs than those using the U.S. average alfalfa hay price.  last_img read more

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