Singapore coach satisfied despite stalemate vs Azkals

first_imgAFF Suzuki Cup match between Philippines and Singapore at Philippine Sports Stadium in Bulacan. They settled for a scoreless tie. Photo by Sherwin Vardeleon/INQUIRERBOCAUE – Singapore coach V. Sundramoorthy was satisfied with the way his team started the 2016 AFF Suzuki Cup, escaping with a scoreless draw against the Philippines Saturday at Philippine Sports Stadium here.“Even though the boys were struggling, I think we left everything out there. Credit to the boys,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Singapore will next face defending champion Thailand on Tuesday.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Dooley rues Azkals’ lack of finishing in draw vs Singapore Defender Hafiz Abu Sujad was booked with a red card at the 35th minute for his kung-fu style challenge against Azkals striker Phil Younghusband. That left the Lions undermanned the rest of the way as they tried to hold fort in their tournament opener.READ: Dooley rues Azkals’ lack of finishing in draw vs SingaporeFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentStill, their efforts proved to be enough, dodging numerous bullets from the Philippine side to split the points after the first matchday.Sundramoorthy said Singapore did well in preserving its cause early in the tournament with the team tied for second with the hosts with one point each. EDITORS’ PICK We are young Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town PH among economies most vulnerable to virus View commentscenter_img As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 MOST READ 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “Obviously, I think it’s difficult to press and try to dominate the ball for a team with 10 players. We’re just trying to see chances where we can counter,” he said.READ: Misfiring Azkals settle for draw vs SingaporeThe Lions were whistled for three yellow cards in the second half for time-wasting, as they milked the clock while also diffusing the Philippines’ momentum in the process.But felt his wards did all they could to snare the full three points for Singapore.“We have a young team and we definitely tried to get the three points, but our task became more difficult with one man out,” Sundramoorthy said.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Read More »

World Gorilla Day: good news and grave threats

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Erik Hoffner Animals, Critically Endangered Species, Gorillas, Great Apes, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Illegal Trade, Logging, Poaching, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade center_img September 24 marks World Gorilla Day, when humanity celebrates one of its closest relatives.All species of gorillas are critically endangered, but that does not mean there’s no hope for these animals.New populations have recently been discovered, and programs to care for orphaned and injured ones are growing. September 24 marks World Gorilla Day, when humanity celebrates one of its closest relatives, sharing 98 percent of our DNA as we do, plus we also have a common ancestor that lived not too long ago in evolutionary terms, around 10 million years ago.All species of gorillas are critically endangered according to the Red List maintained by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), but that does not mean there’s no hope for these species.Below are six recent Mongabay features sharing both good news and areas of worry for gorillas. Visit our Great Apes series for more information and news on these and other great apes.East Africa’s mountain gorilla population now numbers more than 1,000Mountain gorilla infant. Photo courtesy of the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund.According to the results of a census released in May 2018, the mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) population in East Africa’s Virunga Mountains numbered 604 as of June 2016, up from from 480 in 2010. The population hit an all-time low of 242 individuals in 1981. The mountain gorilla is a subspecies of the eastern gorilla with two distinct sub-populations: one in the Virunga Mountains and another in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. A census conducted in 2011 found approximately 400 gorillas living in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, meaning that the total number of mountain gorillas is now believed to be more than 1,000 individuals. Read more here.DRC set to reclassify national parks for oil, open rainforest to loggingGorillas live in an area of Democratic Republic of the Congo set to be opened for logging. Image by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.An investigation found that the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)’s environment ministry has handed over control of three logging concessions in Congo Basin rainforest to Chinese-owned logging companies. Two of these concessions are located in a massive peatland – the largest in the tropics – that was discovered last year. Fourteen more concessions are expected to be awarded to companies in the coming months. The DRC government is also reportedly planning to declassify large portions of Salonga and Virunga national parks to allow oil exploration. Virunga is one of the last bastions of critically endangered mountain gorillas. Continue reading here.More gorillas and chimpanzees living in Central Africa’s forests than thoughtInfant western lowland gorilla twins riding on their mother’s back when they were a year old, in Bai Hokou, Central African Republic. Image by Terence Fuh Neba/WWF Central African Republic.A study led by Wildlife Conservation Society researchers pulled together wildlife survey data collected between 2003 and 2013 at 59 sites in five countries across western Central Africa, and found that more than 361,000 western lowland gorillas and almost 129,000 central chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) inhabit these forests — about 30 percent more gorillas and 10 percent more chimpanzees than previously estimated. Read more about this discovery here.African great ape bushmeat crisis intensifies; few solutions in sightTwo subspecies of gorilla are found in Cameroon, the Western lowland gorilla and a small population of Cross River gorillas. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerGreat ape poaching, which supplies growing urban and rural bushmeat markets, is now at crisis levels across Central Africa, and despite conservationists’ efforts, is showing no sign of slowing down. Vast networks of logging roads, modern weapons, cell phones, cheap motorized transportation, and high demand for wild meat in urban centers is driving the booming bushmeat market. Africa’s great ape sanctuaries rescue some survivors, and active outreach to local communities offer a partial solution. Educational programs for children and adults, teaching the value of great apes, are seen as essential. Continue reading here.As Grauer’s gorillas cling to survival, new population foundA Grauer’s gorilla. Photo courtesy Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund InternationalA mere 15 Grauer’s gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri) were believed to live inside Africa’s Maiko National Park, but biologists suspected otherwise. The preserve’s nearly-impassable jungle could surely shelter more of the Critically Endangered great apes in deep gorges in the shadow of precipitous peaks, they thought, and they were correct. More about this discovery here.Women could be a key to great ape conservation in the CongoOngoing violence in the DRC has taken a heavy toll on the country’s women, with sexual violence there gaining the DRC a label as the “most dangerous place to be a woman.” The nation’s civil strife — along with bushmeat hunting and human encroachment — also threaten its wildlife, especially gorillas, bonobos and chimpanzees. Meanwhile, only about 3,800 Critically Endangered Grauer’s gorillas remain in their DRC homeland. But now, DRC women are overcoming their own difficulties, and with a novel assist from international conservation organizations, are coming to the rescue of Congo’s great apes.GRACE caregiver Aldegonde Saambili tends to a newly orphaned Grauer’s gorilla. Photo courtesy of the Gorilla Rehabilitation and Conservation Education CenterThe Bonobo Conservation Initiative (BCI), Gorilla Rehabilitation and Conservation Education Center (GRACE), the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI), and Coopera are all working side-by-side with local women to help advance great ape conservation through education, empowerment, access to health care and food security.Read this story here, and find all of Mongabay’s coverage of gorilla conservation here.last_img read more

Read More »