CARPHA Member States Receive Training to Aid Mosquito Surveillance and Control

first_img(Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. 20 August 2019).   Outbreaks of Zika in 2016 and Chikungunya in 2014, have highlighted the need to use advanced technologies to collect and review data, in order to prevent and respond to epidemics in a timely manner.  Applying these technologies allow agencies to address how the diseases spread geographically.CARPHA has partnered with the Emory University Center for Humanitarian Emergencies and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, together with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help develop capacity in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to aid in the combat of Zika and other arboviruses in Latin America and the Caribbean. Regional experts lay groundwork for unified response to vector-borne diseases“Although Dengue has been in the Region for years, with the introduction of Chikungunya in 2013, and now Zika, vector-borne diseases (VBDs) have become very prominent, taking centre stage,” stated Dr Karen Polson-Edwards, Acting Director, Surveillance, Disease Prevention and Control at the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA). Dr Polson-Edwards was…March 17, 2017In “CARICOM”Regional network launched to collaborate on Zika, other vector-borne diseasesMosquito borne diseases continue to impact the Caribbean’s social, economic and health sectors. Recent outbreaks of Zika (2016), and Chikungunya (2014) and the continued circulation of Dengue, highlight the need for an integrated approach to the prevention and control of these vector borne diseases (VBDs), especially since many countries depend…August 25, 2017In “CARICOM”Networking to combat Zika and other mosquito-borne diseasesBasseterre, St Kitts and Nevis –  Zika, the latest vector-borne disease, has been reported in more than 30 countries of the Americas. This disease, along with Dengue and Chikungunya continue to threaten the health, tourism, social and economic development of the Region. According to Dr. Joy St. John, Director of Surveillance,…May 25, 2016In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApp Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading…center_img  Participants from 15 CARPHA Member States received advance training in Geographic Information for Vector Surveillance (GIVeS).  The aim was to integrate various innovative GIS technologies that can be used to strengthen health systems in the Region to manage and respond to the threat of vector-borne and other communicable diseases.  This advanced training which took place at University of the West Indies, St. Augustine from 12th – 16th August 2019 is a follow up to the introductory level GIVeS course facilitated by CARPHA, Emory University Center for Humanitarian Emergencies, and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in 2017.  last_img read more

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PPG Names Morales Director of Investor Relations

first_imgPITTSBURGH — Vince Morales has been named director of investor relations for PPG Industries. Morales has 20 years of finance and financial management with the company. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Morales started with PPG in 1985 as an accounting trainee in the corporate controller’s department at the company’s headquarters. He transferred in 1989 to PPG’s shared financial services center in Chillicothe, Ohio, and progressed through a series of financial assignments supporting the glass, fiber glass and coatings businesses. Morales joined the flat glass business in 1997 as director of information and financial services at the Mount Zion, Ill., plant. He was then appointed manager, revenue accounting, supporting the chemical businesses in 2000, returning to Pittsburgh. In 2001, Morales was named director of finance and accounting for glass, fiber glass and chemicals. In his new role, Morales reports to Douglas Atkinson, vice president, investor relations. For more information about PPG, go to: www.ppg.com. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

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Zan Martin Honored For Contributions To Women In the Automotive Aftermarket

first_img Up Next:DURA Automotive Chairman Resigns NASHVILLE, TN — Zan Martin, president and owner of Nashville-based agency, Martin & Company Advertising, was recently awarded the Athena Award by the Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA) Businesswomen’s Network. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementMartin & Company Advertising is a full-service advertising agency that specializes in the automotive, motorcycle and RV aftermarket. As a 20-year member of SEMA, Martin was recognized for her long-time support of the professional growth of women in the industry. A former SEMA Businesswomen’s Network Chair, current co-chair for the Light Truck Accessory Association (LTAA) image task force and two-time nominee to the SEMA Board of Directors, Martin is proactive in providing management opportunities for women in her own business, as well as supporting the professional growth of interns and associates. During her tenure as the SEMA Businesswomen’s Network chair, she was largely responsible for creating the industry-wide mentoring program that is now actively utilized by SEMA professionals. The Athena Award was presented to Martin by current SBN Chair Luanne Brown, on Nov. 3 at SEMA’s annual trade show in Las Vegas. _______________________________________ Click Advertisement Print DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  Don’t Miss:Bob Kaulig Appointed VP of Marketing for Affinia’s Under Vehicle Group,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement In this article:last_img read more

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DPU; Customer Care Center Closes At Lunch June 18

first_imgThe office at 1000 Central Ave. Suite 130 will close at 11:30 a.m. and reopen at 1 p.m. COUNTY News: DPU is holding a summer appreciation luncheon for its employees.center_img Officials with the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities advise that its office, including the Customer Care Center, will be closed during the lunch hour Tuesday, June 18. last_img

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Pajarito Astronomers Dark Night July 6

first_imgPajarito Astronomers News: Weather permitting, the public is invited to come out, wander among the telescopes, and star gaze. The Pajarito Astronomers are holding a County-sponsored Dark Night starting at 8:30 p.m. (sunset) Saturday, July 6 at Spirio Soccer Field, Overlook Park in White Rock. The Moon and the planets Mercury, Mars, Jupiter (with its moons) and Saturn (and its rings) will potentially be visible during the evening. There will be a tour of the summer constellations and there will be telescope views of double stars, star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. Viewing will end before midnight.last_img read more

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County Council Considers Revising Library Policies

first_imgBy KIRSTEN LASKEYLos Alamos Daily Post kirsten@ladailypost.comLibraries everywhere have experienced a lot of changes from the introduction of new technologies to changes in community expectations about libraries’ roles.The Internet and social media have had major impacts on library functions and services, more patrons are requesting e-books and e-magazines, but people still rely on libraries for information, programs, services and a sense of communityIn order to ensure that library policies stay relevant and up-to-date, the Los Alamos County Library board and staff recommended changes to some of the local libraries’ policies. These policies went before Council for its approval during Tuesday night’s meeting.The recommended policies changes included:Photographing or videotaping in the library Language would be added to allow the library to record library programs and events through photographs and/or video and use these photos or video to publicize and promote library services including posting on social media outlets. Additionally, the new policy would require patrons and visitors to obtain permission from other patrons or staff before videotaping or photographing them.  Donations The policy would be changed so that donations can’t be accepted on a conditional basis. This is to ensure operational efficiency and to eliminate potential issues around future disposal of donated items.Public Access Computing, Including Internet Use The recommendation is to do away with requiring signed permission cards for minors to use or view the Internet on library computers. Parental restrictions cannot be enforced and the signed permissions does not guarantee that a minor won’t have unauthorized access to the Internet.Meeting Space Access to public meeting rooms should not be based on meeting content or affiliation and therefore rooms will be scheduled on a first-come, first serve basis. Previously, nonprofits were scheduled rooms on a yearly basis before other reservations were accepted. Additionally, the library would be able to deny use of meeting rooms or reschedule a reservation if a conflict arises with a library sponsored function. The library plans to introduce an online reservation system to allow users to check meeting room availability and book rooms online.Library Manager Eileen Sullivan explained that the policies haven’t been updated since 2010 so it was time to review them. She said technology changes, the prevalence of social media, the Internet as well as the public’s expectation for libraries have all required changes in libraries’ operations and environment.“We are here to serve the community,” Sullivan said. “For us it is really essential to be tuned into what our community wants and needs.”She also pointed out Los Alamos is getting a lot of newcomers as a result of the Laboratory hiring new employees. It is important, she said, to accommodate what this new demographic wants in their library.“We strive to be aware of what the community needs from us and respond to changing needs,” Sullivan said.Work on the new policies started back in January. Sullivan said revising library policies was part of the board’s work plan.She explained the board reviewed the policies one-by-one. During each meeting board members and library management focused on just a few policies. Input was also gathered from librarians.Los Alamos County Assistant Attorneys Kevin Powers and Katie Thwaites also assisted in the process to make sure the revisions were clear and aligned with the First Amendment interpretations, Sullivan said.If Council approves the policy changes, (see update in Post later today) Sullivan said the library will reach out to users affected by the changes, develop guidelines that align with the revisions, and inform users of new procedures. She added library staff will work with regular meeting room users, so they are aware of the changes in scheduling. There will be a link on the library’s website for information about the meeting room software and how to use it. The hope is to have the new scheduling system implemented early next year. Los Alamos County Library System Manager Eileen Sullivan last_img read more

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United Church Easter Services Online 9:30 A.M. Sunday

first_imgThe United Church of Los Alamos at 2525 Canyon Road. Courtesy/United Church  Communion set up at The United Church of Los Alamos. Courtesy/United ChurchUNITED CHURCH News:The United Church of Los Alamos welcomes community members, who would like to worship this Holy season, to visit their website and unite in a way new to many. The United Church site can be found at www.unitedchurchla.org, and features Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday and will host Easter services at 9:30 a.m. this Sunday and can be found later that day online.Los Alamos was the first church in Los Alamos, created in 1947. “United in our faith journeys”, is their motto as the church recognizes six denominations. They practice open communion and invite those watching to gather some juice, crackers or bread and celebrate the Lord’s Supper. Questions can be directed to church Pastors David Elton, Keith Lewis and Kara Windler by calling the church office at 505.662.2971.last_img read more

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Los Alamos National Laboratory: Battling COVID-19 With Expertise, Technology And Materials

first_imgNational Security Sciences Building at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Courtesy/LANLLANL News: A multidisciplinary effortLos Alamos National Laboratory, like many of the Department of Energy national laboratories, is drawing on its rich history in the biological sciences to actively engage in the national effort to study, understand, and answer important questions about the COVID-19 outbreak. Areas covered include disease detection and diagnostics, epidemic modeling, disease prediction and forecasting, decision support, data collection and integration, and medical measures.“Over the last several weeks, the Laboratory has taken extraordinary steps to preserve the ability to execute our mission while assisting our surrounding communities, the state, and our nation during this demanding national emergency,” Los Alamos Director Thom Mason said. “Many are looking to the Laboratory for resources including our expertise, technology, and materials to help combat the COVID-19 virus.”Los Alamos is providing decision-support for business and government, Director Mason said.“We are also collaborating with other national laboratories in the Department of Energy complex to develop an alternative COVID-19 testing method and are evaluating the potential of advanced manufacturing, specifically 3-D printing, to produce scarce medical equipment,” Mason said.Los Alamos’ work in detection and diagnostics is being leveraged to optimize assays for detecting COVID-19 and bioinformaticians are looking at its close genetic relatives to analyze the virus’ evolutionary relationships to other viruses that have been studied. Epidemiological modeling centers are focusing on predicting disease spread to support decision making by government and health agencies. The modeling efforts relies on data collection, data integration, and experienced researchers who can answer questions for decision makers. Medical therapeutics efforts are focusing on ways to leverage our expertise in vaccine optimization, small-molecule discovery, and toxicity testing.A rich history in biological sciencesLos Alamos has decades of experience integrating expertise across biology, chemistry, theory, and engineering. This multi-directorate focus of the Laboratory started in 1945 with studies of radiation health effects, expanded to the impact of radiation on DNA, and went on to include the Human Genome Project in Los Alamos. The Laboratory started GenBank, which is now the repository of DNA used in COVID-19 research.Over the years, Los Alamos has also developed deep expertise in bioinformatics—the information science side of biology.DetectionDetection and modeling begin with understanding historical outbreaks. A Los Alamos database catalogues historic information for key outbreaks of nearly 40 different diseases. That information helps responders select the historic similarities to each new situation, even as an outbreak evolves over the first hours and days. “When an outbreak occurs, we can look at these tools and see if it’s matching what we’ve seen historically,” said Kirsten Taylor-McCabe, a biochemist and national security and defense program manager at Los Alamos. “If it’s not matching, it alerts us that something might be different. It also shows us what happened in the past that people used for mitigative actions, such as contact tracing, vaccination and therapeutic campaigns, and social distancing. Did they work well? What lessons learned can we take away from actions taken in past outbreaks?”Los Alamos has a long history in computational design assays, which assess or measure the presence of pathogens. Bacteria and viruses evolve over time and researchers learn more about their genomes on a daily basis. This information is utilized to optimize assays.“They erode over time,” Taylor-McCabe said. “We need to keep pace with that and deliver assays that will be functional for COVID-19 or for future outbreaks. For diagnostics, we’re trying to leverage ways that we understand the host’s innate immune system. How can we triage what’s going on in the field? How can we understand if you have a bacterial or a viral infection? At Los Alamos, these are the techniques we are trying to leverage for this COVID-19 outbreak.”TestingLos Alamos is leading a Department of Energy–wide laboratory working group on COVID-19 testing and participating in assessments of lab capabilities for near- and long-term testing requirements, both for public health and for the Los Alamos enterprise.COVID-19 modeling“Modeling the epidemic sheds light on its growth rate, time of origin, future case counts, and the effectiveness of mitigation strategies,” said Nick Hengartner, leader of the Theoretical Biology and Biophysics group at Los Alamos. “Realistic epidemic models enable decision makers to validate data quality and play what-if scenarios.”Virus spread“For modeling, we’re looking at the spread of disease. We’re looking at it globally, all the way down to the county level,” Kirsten Taylor-McCabe said. “So in New Mexico we’re looking at the county level, we’re looking at how the disease is spreading, what the forecasts are for when we will see a peak in cases, how many people might be hospitalized, how many people may be in the ICU, how many might need ventilators, both from no intervention scenarios all the way through to high intervention scenarios.”“Because we have those physical models that are reasonably realistic and we can model them at low levels of geographic aggregation, it allows us to actually validate the data,” said Nick Hengartner. “One of the things that comes out is that we believe that we don’t see everyone who is sick at this time. That is something that our model is able to tell us. It’s also able to tell us if the mitigation strategies that we are implementing are working because we can compare what the models predict with the actual data that we are collecting.”Genetic research“Part of the modeling also uses the basic law of biology—evolution,” Hengartner said. “Things evolve, and by looking at how viruses evolve and putting them in context of related organisms, which is what a phylogenetic tree shows, we can make several conclusions. For example, we know now that COVID-19 is related to but not the same as the SARS virus. We can also see that COVID-19 evolves relatively slowly, which is good news.”The phylogenetic tree also shows close genetic neighbors or related viruses that have been found in bats and pangolins.“When we look at genetic-sequence similarity and we compare it to others, we see that this particular virus not only made use of point mutation, or very small genetic mutations, but it also rearranges its genome a little bit,” Hengartner said. “And looking at the patterns and how it has been rearranged and point mutations, we are very confident to say that this follows what we would expect from a naturally emerging and evolving organism.”Medical measures“One of the interesting proteins of the coronavirus is the crown—it’s those spikes,” Hengartner said, referring to the spiky protuberances that can be seen in microscopic images of the virus. “Those spikes matter because they attach themselves to the surface of a cell and then somehow inject the virus’s RNA into the cell and that’s how the infection happens. For that to happen, this attaching to the cell membrane, there are two receptors. It turns out that having two ways for the virus attach to itself to the membrane is actually not common, and one of these receptors is in the upper lung and the other one is in the lower lung,” Hengartner said.This may give a hint about how COVID-19 progresses as a respiratory disease.“Now that we know that it binds with those receptors, this provides us with an opportunity to say ‘well, are there any therapeutics that could mitigate or disrupt this kind of behavior?’” Hengartner said. “Just looking at the structure of the molecule gives us an idea about what kind of molecules or drugs we should be looking for.”Developing artificial human organs for drug testing“When we have these drug candidates, it would be fantastic to be able to test them rapidly in a human-based system, something that’s clinically relevant to the human,” Taylor-McCabe said. “Right now, drugs go through animal testing. At Los Alamos, we’re trying to bridge that gap with a human organoid platform that would better mimic what would happen within the human host. Our project includes an artificial human heart, lung, and liver. These are systems that would be able to screen some of the drug candidates that are out there.”Supporting vaccine development“People are feverishly trying to develop a vaccine and have already designed vaccines that are in testing phase, but at Los Alamos, we also want to look into the future,” Hengartner said. “One of the risks that we’ve recognized with this coronavirus is that there is an immense pool of other coronaviruses hiding in bats and pangolins and snakes and what not. We would like to come up with a strategy to protect us, not just against this particular strain, but maybe next year’s jump, too.”Los Alamos’ research in this area draws on its experience designing an HIV vaccine, which recently underwent human trials. HIV mutates extremely quickly, giving it a broad diversity that is difficult to address with a single vaccine. Los Alamos addressed that problem by creating a “mosaic” vaccine that is a patchwork of HIV genomes.With COVID-19, Hengartner said, “it doesn’t mutate that fast but we have a broad diversity, so if we can use similar mosaic strategies, we can start thinking about designing a vaccine that will protect us from future infections and outbreaks—and nip this one in the bud at the get-go.”Manufacturing“On the manufacturing side of the house, Los Alamos has been working in a DOE-wide working group, participating in assessments of how the labs can support the need for ventilators, masks, face-shields, and consumable parts for lab testing,” Kirsten Taylor-McCabe said. “We’re in the deep dive phase, trying to figure out how we can help and what is the best way that we can work with the commercial sector.”Research Collaborations with Los AlamosThe Biosurveillance Gateway is a Los Alamos website housing data about the pandemic and giving outside researchers an entry point for accessing Laboratory expertise in COVID-19 modeling, diagnosis, and decision support.“You can also look at who to contact for some of these efforts and submit questions, which we will triage and try to link you up to the scientists that are working in this area,” Taylor-McCabe said.Kirsten Taylor-McCabe is a biochemist and national security and defense program manager, and Nicolas Hengartner is leader of the Theoretical Biology and Biophysics group at Los Alamos National Laboratory.last_img read more

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Saturday’s Virtual Los Alamos ScienceFest Discovery Day 2020 Features STEM Advocate Miss America 2020, Live Demos And Discussions

first_imgScienceFest News:The first virtual Los Alamos ScienceFest Discovery Day is 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 11.Attendees can login to the event app to view exhibitor profiles, engage in online content and videos, sign up for a chance to win raffle prizes and giveaways, and even tune in for live virtual discussions and demos.The day will kick off at 10 a.m. with a live demo and Q&A from Miss America 2020, Miss Camille Schrier, a STEM advocate. Details for this event and others can be found on the app (desktop or mobile) as well as through the ScienceFest website in the Event Schedule section by clicking on “View Schedule and Attend Virtually.” Links to live discussions also will be posted directly in Exhibitor Virtual Booths. Registration is requested in advance for some activities.Exhibitors expected to go live are noted as follows:10:00 a.m. LIVE with Miss America 2020, Miss Camille Schrier – A Virtual “Blood Bubbles” Demonstration and Classroom Chat Miss Camille Schrier, a STEM advocate who holds biochemistry and systems biology degrees, will engage with students about pH, the blood, and why we breathe in this fun demonstration. Have a chance to ask questions! Register Here10-10:45 a.m. LIVE with TechSource 10-12 p.m. Live with RoboRAVE International 10-3 p.m. Live with UbiQD11 a.m. Live with The Education Plan 11-1 p.m. Live with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)11-2 p.m. Live with New Mexico State University Plant and Environmental Sciences11-3 Live with the American Chemical Society 11:30 a.m. Live with the Superintendent of Los Alamos Public Schools 11:30 a.m. Live with UNM-LA Computer Science Faculty12:30-12:45 p.m. Live with Be Greater Than Average 12:30-1:30 p.m. Live with the Bradbury Science Museum 1:00-1:40 p.m. Live with Science Girl’s Lab1:00 Live with a Docent from the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History1:30-2:00 p.m. Live with Los Alamos Public Schools – “Where in the World is Topper?”2:00 p.m. Live with PBS Science Café – Animal Espionage on the Pajarito Plateau2:30 p.m. Live with STEM Santa FeThis list is not inclusive of all exhibitors, so attendees are encouraged to use the app to visit the virtual exhibitor booths. The free app may be downloaded from Whova, or attendees may use the desktop app, which is a 2-step verification process. Users must first register via Eventbrite and then click “Attend Virtually” on the ScienceFest homepage and create an event account using the same registration email. There may be a slight delay in verification between platforms.For questions or concerns, contact lauren@losalamos.org or jeremy@losalamos.org. More information may be found on www.LosAlamosScienceFest.com, and participants are encouraged to share photos using the hashtag, #LosAlamosScienceFest2020 for a chance to win cool prizes from the Los Alamos History Museum, American Chemical Society and more!Los Alamos ScienceFest 2020 is made possible thanks to generous sponsors:Los Alamos County, Enterprise Bank & Trust, Del Norte Credit Union, TechSource, UNM-LA, and UbiQD, as well as dozens of local partners and organizations.last_img read more

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