High status job means you are less likely to respond to treatment for depression

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook An international study has found that having a high status job means that you are less likely to respond to standard treatment with medications for depression. These results, which may have implications for clinicians and their patients, employers and public policy, are presented at the ECNP Congress in Vienna.Up to a third of patients who receive drug treat for depression do not respond to treatment. Knowing which groups don’t respond could help clinicians understand which treatments are appropriate to which person. In the case of workers, it may also enable employers to take steps to ease stressful conditions. Although there is a wealth of research showing that low social and economic status is associated with a greater risk of depression, there has been little work focusing on how occupational levels respond to treatment.A group of international researchers from Belgium, Italy, Israel and Austria enlisted 654 working adults attending clinics for depression, and classified their work according to occupational level. 336 (51.4%) held high occupational level jobs, 161 (24.6%) middle-level, and 157 (24%) low level. Around two-thirds of the patients were female (65.6%), which reflects the normal gender difference in reported depression. Most patients were treated with SRIs (Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors), although other pharmaceutical agents were also used, as well as psychotherapy. Those in the higher levels were found to have received fewer SRIs and more psychotherapy. Share on Twitter Emailcenter_img LinkedIn On analysing results after treatment, they found that 55.9% in the highest occupational group were resistant to treatment. In contrast, only 40.2% of the middle-level workers remained treatment resistant, and 44.3 of the low-level workers. This difference was also reflected in the degree of remission, with only around one in 6 in remission in the higher status group, as against around one in 4 for the other groups.Commenting, Professor Siegfried Kasper (Vienna, Austria) said “Though these findings should be considered preliminarily, they indicate that high occupational levels may be a risk factor for poor response to treatment. A number of variables may explain these findings. For example, there may be specific working environment demands and stressors; people may find it difficult to accept or cope with illness, or to continue with medication; or there may be other factors, related for example to cognitive, personality and behavioural differences”.Co-worker Professor Joseph Zohar (ECNP Past-President, Tel-Hashomer, Israel)  said; “This shows that the need for precise prescribing is not only related to the symptoms and genetics but also to occupational level; one might need to prescribe different medication for the same disorder and need to take into account the occupational level in order to reach optimum effect”.Professor Eduard Vieta (ECNP Executive Committee member and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona), commented:“The results of this study might sound counterintuitive, but people with highly demanding jobs are subject to a lot of stress, and when they breakdown with depression it may be particularly difficult to cope with their previous life. An alternative explanation, which cannot be ruled out given the naturalistic design of the study, is that high-status job patients may be more prone to request psychosocial treatments without the support of pharmacotherapy. The ideal treatment of depression is, in general, the combination of both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy.”A paper based on this work is published in European Neuropsychopharmacology. Sharelast_img read more

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NEWS SCAN: Flu and bipolar disorder, H7N3 in Mexico, sequester and food inspections, Rotary polio honors

first_img Food inspections spared from automatic budget cutsFood safety inspections will be spared from sequestration budget cuts, thanks to congressional action that prevents US Department of Agriculture (USDA) meat inspector furloughs and ensures Food and Drug Administration (FDA) budgeting to minimize the impact, Food Safety News (FSN) reported today. Earlier this year the White House warned that the budget cuts could threaten the safety of the nation’s food supply and possibly lead to more foodborne illnesses. In March, however, Congress reinstated funding to the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). FDA spokeswoman Shelly Burgess told FSN that as the agency finds a way to absorb $209 million in cuts it will scale back on travel and training, with a goal of sparing food safety inspections. Regarding sequestration cuts, some stakeholders still have concerns that the lack of resources will hobble the ability of the FDA to move forward with implementing parts of the 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act, according to FSN.May 8 FSN story May 8, 2013 Study: Flu in pregnancy may raise risk of bipolar disorder in offspringA study published today in JAMA Psychiatry suggests that maternal influenza during pregnancy may increase the risk of bipolar disorder (BD) in her child. The finding comes from a case-control study of a birth cohort from the Child Health and Development Study (CHDS), which involved nearly all pregnant women who received obstetric care from the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care plan, Northern California Region, from 1959 through 1966. The researchers gathered data on treated maternal flu cases from the CHDS. They used several approaches to look for potential BD cases in the cohort, including searching databases of the CHDS, Kaiser Permanente, and a large county healthcare system; mailing a questionnaire to the CHDS cohort; and using an earlier psychiatric follow-up study on the cohort. The team identified 92 BD case-patients and 722 matched controls. Eight of the 92 BD case-patients (8.7%) were exposed to flu at any time during gestation, versus 19 of 722 controls (2.6%), which signaled an odds ratio of 3.82 (95% confidence interval, 1.58 to 9.24; P = .003). Adjustment for several potential confounders, including maternal age, race, and education, made little difference. The authors also found that exposure to maternal respiratory infections other than influenza was not linked to an increase in BD risk. “Although replication is required, the findings suggest that prevention of maternal influenza during pregnancy may reduce the risk of BD,” the authors conclude.May 8 JAMA Psychiatry abstract New H7N3 outbreaks in Mexico destroy almost 900,000 poultryFive outbreaks of H7N3 avian flu in poultry in Mexico’s Jalisco, Guanajuato, and Puebla states have killed 40,010 birds and led to the culling of 850,005 others, the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) reported today. Two of the outbreaks were in Jalisco, including one that began Mar 1 in a 16-bird backyard flock and one that affected 320,000 birds from Apr 29 to May 2 on a commercial layer farm. Two outbreaks in early April were confirmed in Guanajuato, one in a heavy breeder flock and one on a fattening farm. On one farm 319,398 birds were culled, and on the other 100,601 birds were culled to prevent disease spread. The final outbreak, in Puebla, began May 1 and was resolved yesterday. It involved by far the most poultry killed by the virus, 40,000, with 110,000 additional birds culled. All told, 890,015 poultry died in the five outbreaks and culls. About a month ago Mexican authorities said that recent H7N3 outbreaks had destroyed almost 4 million poultry and cost farmers about $32 million.May 8 OIE reportApr 2 CIDRAP News item on previous outbreak totals Rotary International honors 5 US Congress members for polio effortsRotary International today recognized five members of the US Congress as Polio Eradication Champions for their efforts to eliminate polio. The group of worldwide business leaders recognized Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hi., Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Ga., Rep. Jim McDermott, D-Wash., and Rep. Jim Moran, D-Va., at the Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Rotary International established the award in 1995 “to recognize heads of state, health agency leaders, and others who have made a significant contribution to the global eradication of polio,” the group said in a news release.May 8 Rotary news releaselast_img read more

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News Scan for Jun 23, 2014

first_imgFDA approves another antibacterial for skin infectionsThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved tedizolid phosphate (Sivextro), a new antibacterial drug to treat adults with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), the agency announced on Jun 20.Tedizolid, made by Cubist Pharmaceuticals, Lexington, Mass., is the second antibacterial for skin infections to win FDA approval in the past month. On May 23 the agency approved dalbavancin (Dalavance), made by Durata Therapeutics of Chicago.The FDA said tedizolid is intended for ABSSSI caused by certain susceptible bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus (both methicillin-resistant strains [MRSA] and methicillin-susceptible strains), various Streptococcus species, and Enterococcus faecalis. It is available for intravenous and oral use.The drug received an expedited review because it was designated as a qualified infectious disease product, the agency said. That designation also qualifies it for an extra 5 years of marketing exclusivity, on top of exclusivity periods already provided by the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) said the approvals of tedizolid and dalbavancin signify progress in the group’s 10 x ’20 Initiative, which aims for the development of 10 new antibiotics by 2020.In an e-mailed statement, IDSA President Barbara Murray, MD, said that since the launch of the initiative in 2010, three antibiotics have been approved, and pharmaceutical manufacturer Roche has announced plans to invest in the development of new antibiotics.”While this news is encouraging, we still have a great deal more work to do to combat antibiotic resistance and ensure we have the tools necessary to help the patients who need it the most,” Murray said. Jun 20 FDA announcement Jun 5 CIDRAP News item on dalbavancin China reports new H7N9 case in Zhejiang provinceA 51-year-old man from Taizhou, a city in Zhejiang province, is in critical condition after contracting H7N9 avian influenza, according to a Macao health bureau report translated and posted today by the infectious disease news board FluTrackers.The man, a market greengrocer, was hospitalized on Jun 20, the report said.His case pushes China’s overall H7N9 outbreak total to 451, according to an ongoing tally kept by FluTrackers. The number of outbreak deaths remains at at least 158.Jun 23 FluTrackers threadFluTrackers human H7N9 case listlast_img read more

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County Council Considers Revising Library Policies

first_imgBy KIRSTEN LASKEYLos Alamos Daily Post kirsten@ladailypost.comLibraries everywhere have experienced a lot of changes from the introduction of new technologies to changes in community expectations about libraries’ roles.The Internet and social media have had major impacts on library functions and services, more patrons are requesting e-books and e-magazines, but people still rely on libraries for information, programs, services and a sense of communityIn order to ensure that library policies stay relevant and up-to-date, the Los Alamos County Library board and staff recommended changes to some of the local libraries’ policies. These policies went before Council for its approval during Tuesday night’s meeting.The recommended policies changes included:Photographing or videotaping in the library Language would be added to allow the library to record library programs and events through photographs and/or video and use these photos or video to publicize and promote library services including posting on social media outlets. Additionally, the new policy would require patrons and visitors to obtain permission from other patrons or staff before videotaping or photographing them.  Donations The policy would be changed so that donations can’t be accepted on a conditional basis. This is to ensure operational efficiency and to eliminate potential issues around future disposal of donated items.Public Access Computing, Including Internet Use The recommendation is to do away with requiring signed permission cards for minors to use or view the Internet on library computers. Parental restrictions cannot be enforced and the signed permissions does not guarantee that a minor won’t have unauthorized access to the Internet.Meeting Space Access to public meeting rooms should not be based on meeting content or affiliation and therefore rooms will be scheduled on a first-come, first serve basis. Previously, nonprofits were scheduled rooms on a yearly basis before other reservations were accepted. Additionally, the library would be able to deny use of meeting rooms or reschedule a reservation if a conflict arises with a library sponsored function. The library plans to introduce an online reservation system to allow users to check meeting room availability and book rooms online.Library Manager Eileen Sullivan explained that the policies haven’t been updated since 2010 so it was time to review them. She said technology changes, the prevalence of social media, the Internet as well as the public’s expectation for libraries have all required changes in libraries’ operations and environment.“We are here to serve the community,” Sullivan said. “For us it is really essential to be tuned into what our community wants and needs.”She also pointed out Los Alamos is getting a lot of newcomers as a result of the Laboratory hiring new employees. It is important, she said, to accommodate what this new demographic wants in their library.“We strive to be aware of what the community needs from us and respond to changing needs,” Sullivan said.Work on the new policies started back in January. Sullivan said revising library policies was part of the board’s work plan.She explained the board reviewed the policies one-by-one. During each meeting board members and library management focused on just a few policies. Input was also gathered from librarians.Los Alamos County Assistant Attorneys Kevin Powers and Katie Thwaites also assisted in the process to make sure the revisions were clear and aligned with the First Amendment interpretations, Sullivan said.If Council approves the policy changes, (see update in Post later today) Sullivan said the library will reach out to users affected by the changes, develop guidelines that align with the revisions, and inform users of new procedures. She added library staff will work with regular meeting room users, so they are aware of the changes in scheduling. There will be a link on the library’s website for information about the meeting room software and how to use it. The hope is to have the new scheduling system implemented early next year. Los Alamos County Library System Manager Eileen Sullivan last_img read more

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JEREMY NEWSUM: Property’s sheep got us into this mess. A good shepherd might get us out

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Third generation continues tradition of excellence

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Country Focus: Singapore

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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USA: Corps Completes Lynnhaven Inlet Dredging

first_imgThe Lynnhaven Inlet Federal Navigation Channel is fully navigable, after a $2 million maintenance dredging project, managed by the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, removed critical shoaling conditions exacerbated by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.The project, contracted to Southwind Construction Corporation, a small business based in Evansville, Ind., came in ahead of schedule and within budget, said Andy Reid, Norfolk District’s contract office representative.The maintenance dredging also featured beneficial reuse and placement of approximately 112,000 cubic yards of sand on 6,500 feet of shoreline, from the Lynnhaven Inlet to a nearby neighborhood along Chic’s Beach in Virginia Beach.“The city of Virginia Beach is extremely pleased with Norfolk District’s performance on this contract,” said Phill Roehrs, P.E., Virginia Beach’s water resources engineer. “The vital waterway serving the basin was cleared of all shoaling, and the sand removed from the channel was placed on one of our erosional shorelines to provide replenishment. It’s the best of both worlds.”Lynnhaven Inlet annually undergoes maintenance dredging to combat critical shoaling. However, due to Hurricane Sandy’s impact on the Virginia Beach coastline, shoaling conditions worsened and required accelerated dredging, said Kristin Mazur, Norfolk District’s project manager.“Surveys identified critical shoaling in the entrance channel, turning basin and side channels of the project,” Mazur said. “This shoaling, if left alone, would have adversely impacted a wide variety of maritime industry, and threatened safe and efficient navigation.”The project typically requires full-maintenance dredging cycles about every three years.Lynnhaven Inlet Federal Navigation Channel, which was authorized by the River and Harbor Act of Oct. 23, 1962, is located on the Chesapeake Bay, within the city of Virginia Beach. The navigation project provides access to the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean for commercial fishing vessels, charter fishing boats, head boats and a wide range of private recreational vessels.The channel is used by the pilot boats for both the Virginia and Maryland pilot stations based inside the inlet to transport pilots from their dock to deep-draft ships entering the Chesapeake Bay.[mappress]Press Release, February 3, 2014last_img read more

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Six fast supply vessels delivered for Petrobras charter

first_imgThe final six fast supply vessels (FSVs), designed by the Australian ship designer Incat Crowther, have recently been delivered to Baru Offshore, for charter with Petrobras. Incat said on Wednesday the vessels were the last of a dozen 48 meter-long DNV Classed DP-1 monohulls named the Baru Serrana, Baru Tesoro, Baru Sinu, Baru Sirius, Baru Taurus, and Baru Vega.The vessels were delivered over the last several months by shipbuilder ETP Engenharia to Baru Offshore, a subsidiary of Intertug, for charter with Petrobras.The initial contract for the design of these vessels was awarded to Incat Crowther back in 2012 while the first delivered vessel in the series, the Baru Gorgona, was launched in 2014.The vessel design has been optimized to comply with the Petrobras UT4000 FSV specification. Liquid capacities include 42,000 liters of ship’s fuel, 90,000 liters of cargo fuel, 10,000 liters of ship’s water, and 88,000 liters of fresh water.The vessels are equipped with an expansive aft cargo deck of 225 square meters of usable area rated for three tonnes per square meter and a total capacity of 250 tonnes of deck cargo.An additional 30 square meters of cargo area is provided inside the main deck cabin, allowing for carriage of items out of the elements, such as food, medical supplies, small tools and similar type cargoes. This space can be reconfigured for the accommodation of 60 offshore personnel.The vessel also has six cabins to accommodate 11 crew members.The vessels are powered by a quartet of Cummins main engines, each rated at 1800 BHP with propulsion via fixed-pitched propellers. The vessels have a service speed of 21 knots.last_img read more

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A summertime chill

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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