How are Europe’s politicians reacting to Theresa May’s big Brexit speech?

“This speech made clear what the UK wants to do. Still the negotiations only start when Article 50 is triggered,” Merkel said.”We agreed we will coordinate our positions. In relation to our economies, I’m not afraid. I think we’ll stick together.”Europe must not be divided and we will make sure this doesn’t happen by keeping very close contacts with each other.”Read More: “No deal” or “Bad deal” – Six things we learned from May’s Brexit speechHer sentiment was echoed by European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker who told MEPs in Strasbourg that he “would do everything to reach a balanced solution”, while specifically referencing May’s comments to say that “a speech does not trigger a negotiation” And the vice-president of Marine Le Pen’s Front National added that May’s comments showed commitment to a “clear” Brexit and respect for British voters. Sweden’s former foreign minister Carl Bildt said that many EU members would have preferred a closer relationship with the UK whatsapp While, Czech Europe minister Tomas Prouza said May’s plans were “ambitious”. European Council president Donald Tusk similarly told MEPs that May’s speech showed Downing Street understood messages from Europe on the ability to retain Single Market membership without signing up for Freedom of Movement.”It would be good if our partners also understood that there will be no place for pick-and-choose tactics in our future negotiations,” Tusk added. “At the same time I want to underline, that we took note of the warm and balanced words of Prime Minister May on European integration, which were much closer to the narrative of Winston Churchill than that of the American President-elect Trump.”Read More: “Privileged” Single Market access is critical for London, says KhanIt comes after May yesterday had phone calls with Juncker, Tusk,  Merkel and outgoing French president Francois Hollande. More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.com After taking a night to digest Theresa May’s landmark address at Lancaster House yesterday, Europe’s politicians are slowly stirring to issue their own thoughts on the Prime Minister’s Brexit plan.German chancellor Angela Merkel has led the way with some brief comments at a press conference with the Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni. Mark Sands Downing Street said the EU chiefs had welcomed “greater clarity” on the UK’s position, while Merkel and Hollande both appreciated May’s commitment to supporting the EU after Brexit.Read More: It’s May way or the Highway: PM confirms UK will seek bespoke Brexit dealFrom Twitter…Before speaking to the Prime Minister yesterday, Tusk gave May’s comments a cautious welcome, noting that the Prime Minister’s comments were “realistic” whatsapp How are Europe’s politicians reacting to Theresa May’s big Brexit speech? Wednesday 18 January 2017 1:29 pm Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryUndoOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutUndoHealthyGemBaby Has Never Eaten Sugar Or Carbs, Wait Till You See Her TodayHealthyGemUndoMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndoAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorUndoSportPirateMeet The Woman Catherine Bell Is Dating At 52SportPirateUndoUnify Health LabsRandy Jackson: This 3 Minute Routine Transformed My HealthUnify Health LabsUndoWarped SpeedCan You Name More State Capitals Than A 5th Grader? Find Out Now!Warped SpeedUndoPensAndPatronTori Roloff Confirms Devastating News About The FamilyPensAndPatronUndo Share read more

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Why is M&A rising? The bigger the company, the more likely it is to survive

by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeCrafthoughtThis One Photo Caused Her Marriage To Dissolve ImmediatelyCrafthoughtHappy-Tricks.comClogged drain? Solve it yourself without a plumber Happy-Tricks.comHealth.recetasgetHeart Attack Early Warning Signs and SymptomsHealth.recetasgetweniix.comLook The Future of Carsweniix.comPower LifeWant to Feel Stronger at 60 than at 30? Top Expert Says Do This One ThingPower LifeFoundation Repair | Search AdsLooking For Cheap Foundation Service? Scottsdale Residents Could Benefit From 2021 PricesFoundation Repair | Search AdsHabit TribeColorado Mom Adopted Two Children, Months Later She Learned Who They Really AreHabit TribeBuzzerty8 Signs you may have Rheumatoid ArthritisBuzzertykawnjamil.com/10 Brain Tumor Signs You Should Never Ignorekawnjamil.com/ Why is M&A rising? The bigger the company, the more likely it is to survive Internet disruption has been cited by insurance firms as one of the biggest challenges, with the chief financial officer of Aviva Thomas Stoddard telling CNBC recently that online disruption was still costing the company money, rather than providing new revenue.Read more: Where are the insurance tech startups?Well let’s put it all together: the sector isn’t just contending with technology disruption, but the interest rate outlook is changing thanks to Trump reflation lifting yields, which has huge ramifications for the valuation of insurance investments, and the pace of economic growth drives demand for insurance products and pricing. And then there is the minefield of regulation. No one really knows what’s coming but bulking up bolsters survival chances.It’s the same story for media firms. Digital is destroying profits but demands for expensive news and entertainment content continue to grow in an effort to hold on to subscribers. Now there is a new threat: a combative Trump determined to question the credibility of news organisations, the heartbeat of many media businesses.Pharmaceuticals have also come under fire from Trump on drug pricing. While not everyone in the sector is innocent, there is a broader trend of generics ruining profits and the ability to use those proceeds to plough into research and development. And what about auto companies? Who knows if Trump will take a sledgehammer to the low cost global supply chain that has taken years to build as they too face disruption from new technology.It’s no coincidence given all the complex challenges confronting companies that mega-cap deals are accelerating. Not all will succeed, as seen on the weekend with Kraft Heinz folding on its Unilever advances, but that is the nature of large takeovers. Small, dynamic and nimble companies had the edge post financial crisis – now they may simply be prey in a world where only companies with the deepest pockets, brand power and strategic prowess survive. Investor sentiment is still skyrocketing as Donald Trump continues his victory lap and investors revel in the fanfare.The markets are behaving as though the White House’s as-yet-undetailed economic policies will cure all ills, from the simmering uncertainty around French, Dutch and German elections to the biggest pain for chief executives – technology disruption. The C-suite is using toppy stock prices to lob deals, which must surely demonstrate their confidence. whatsapp whatsapp Share But what if some of the cleverest minds in the world are pursuing deals and investment out of fear and necessity rather than confidence, and companies are really just building Noah’s ark before the storm? It leaves me pondering: is scale the only way to survive the next decade and should investors play markets by riding a wave of mergers and acquisitions?Read more: German minister hits out at London Stock Exchange bosses over mega-mergerIt’s undeniable that global sentiment is improving. The Philadelphia Fed Index last week surged to 43.3 from 23.6 in January, the highest level since 1984, signalling roaring animal spirits. Here in Europe, the conservative Lloyds Private Bank investment sentiment index climbed to its highest since April 2016. Investors last week also chased US stocks to record highs.Some would argue it’s all related to Trump but what happened to the discount for risk? Populist politics are creating significant uncertainty for the C-suite, not to mention the threat of technology disruption to traditional business models.Allianz’s chief financial officer Dieter Wemmer told CNBC last week that scale would matter in the future, particularly around the key business units of property and casualty insurance in some markets. Allianz has been cited recently as a bold acquirer of big but tricky assets to pin down – including Generali in Italy and QBE Insurance in Australia. The insurer won’t comment on transactions but investors can ask: why bother with such difficult targets? Is the company merely being prudent if it chases insurance giants in two important markets? Karen TsoKaren Tso is anchor on CNBC’s Squawk Box Europe. Monday 20 February 2017 4:15 pm read more

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The subscription economy may be the future for businesses, as firms switch to selling outcomes rather than products

whatsapp Wednesday 29 August 2018 10:08 am Luke GrahamLuke is a former City AM features writer, now features editor for Tyto PR Share The subscription economy may be the future for businesses, as firms switch to selling outcomes rather than products At one end, you have consumers subscribing to Apple Music in order to access millions of songs, instead of buying new albums; subscribing to Amazon Prime in order to get faster deliveries of physical goods; or signing up to a car subscription service such as Zipcar, so that they don’t have to own a vehicle themselves.Read more: Deliveroo’s testing an Amazon Prime-style delivery subscriptionMeanwhile, many businesses are now subscribing to cloud computing services and tech platforms to design products or manage customer relations, rather than paying the large cost of buying expensive programmes outright. These types of subscription are known as “software as a service” (SaaS).For both big and small customers, these types of subscription services offer convenience and flexibility, as consumers can trial it and switch before they commit, and often at a lower cost.The advantages for customers are clear, but what about sellers? Moving to a subscription model introduces the risk that customers will stop subscribing and sacrifices the upfront benefit of making a large, one-off sale. However, the subscription model offers a significant long-term advantage to sellers too, as loyal subscribers will generate constant income on a regular basis. “When I wake up at the start of the year, or start of the quarter, or start of the month, I have a known predictable revenue,” says Tien Tzuo, co-founder of Zuora, which designs SaaS applications for firms keen to switch to the subscription model.“That’s a much better model than, say, the old Hollywood model, where you spend $200m making a movie and you hope it might work out.” “You compare that to Walmart, where millions of people walk through a Walmart every two weeks and buy something, but the company doesn’t know who they are. Walmart is thinking ‘how do I sell more products’ instead of ‘how do I build a relationship with my customers’.”According to Tzuo, the relationship between a subscriber and the provider will deepen based on the value they create. The firm can then use data to refine that relationship and become even more valuable to that customer.But surely there are limits to this trend? While many customers are subscribing to software platforms or to stream entertainment, won’t they still need to buy other products? For example, farmers and construction companies will still have to buy physical vehicles and equipment.Not necessarily, according to Tzuo.“We try to tell companies, it’s not about the product – you want to extract what the customer is really looking for out of the product. It was never about the CD, it was about the enjoyment of music; it was never about the car, it was always about getting from point A to point B, in the easiest way possible. Let’s start with tractors – are you really trying to buy a tractor, or are you really trying to move some dirt?” Tzuo, who spent nine years working at US company Salesforce which was an early kickstarter of the SaaS trend, is evangelical about the subscription model, and predicts that in the future, more and more businesses will switch to it, rather than simply selling individual products. As well as the regular income stream, Tzuo believes that subscription companies need to have a closer one-to-one relationship with their customers (and thus capture more data about them), which gives them a competitive advantage.“Let’s contrast Amazon to Walmart. Amazon has the advantage, because everything you’ve ever done with it is tied back to your ID. Amazon knows all the movies I watch and the music I listen to, knows what time I wake up, pretty soon it’ll know all the groceries I buy at Wholefoods,” Tzuo explains. When was the last time you actually bought a DVD or CD? Most likely, you subscribe to a digital streaming service, like Netflix or Spotify. Congratulations, you’re part of the burgeoning subscription economy.But this subscription-based economy isn’t just limited to entertainment media. Increasingly, both individual consumers and big businesses are finding it more convenient to subscribe to services, rather than owning or buying products outright. Tzuo explains that companies like heavy equipment manufacturer Caterpillar are working on services where they can use drones and aerial technology to map out a space, and then send instructions to autonomous machines that can then do precision excavations.“Why should I buy the tractor when I can go to someone and say ‘I’m trying to build the golf course, I want it to look this’ and just pay for the benefit of the outcome I’m looking for? When you look at it that way, any business can transform to provide the outcome the customer is looking for, without having to force them to buy all these products and figure it out for themselves.”This subscription-based economy does have it challenges. Transitioning to a subscription service requires understanding new technology, as well as embracing a completely different business model that offers less upfront revenue and risks losing subscribers to competitors unless companies work harder to keep them loyal.But companies like Zuora are hoping to guide businesses into the future and make this transition. As long as they subscribe, of course.Read more: The subscription economy: An end to ownership? You want to extract what the customer is really looking for out of the product whatsapp read more

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Social care funding crisis could be solved by new pensions-style payments, says health secretary

first_imgSpeaking on Monday, Hancock said: “I’m attracted to the model of auto-enrolment, which has been so successful in pensions.”If you make it the norm, tell people what it is they have to do to look after themselves, it’s often the case that very few people will opt out.”It takes away the injustice of people losing all that they have saved for.”Read more: Boris and Brexit to dominate party conference season… againA Westminster insider told City A.M. in July any changes to how social care would be funded would be gradual as Downing Street “doesn’t want to scare people so this is about dealing with future generations – they don’t want to piss off older people”. Currently older people with assets worth more than £23,250 must part-fund the cost of the care they receive, but there are growing fears of a looming crisis as a result of the UK’s ageing population.The Local Government Association claims the social care shortfall could hit £3.5bn by 2025. A social care insurance scheme is being considered by the Conservatives to help tackle the crisis in elderly health provision.The scheme, first revealed by City A.M. in July, would see workers paying in to a dedicated national care fund to help cover the growing cost of social care. whatsapp Owen Bennett Share Monday 17 September 2018 4:02 pmcenter_img Social care funding crisis could be solved by new pensions-style payments, says health secretary More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.com Read more: The government has a new plan to fund social care after ‘dementia tax’ rowThe plan is set to be part of a government green paper on social care funding, due out this autumn, and would operate on the same lines as pensions contributions, where workers can choose to opt-out of the system.The proposal, being pushed by health and social care secretary Matthew Hancock, sees the Tories confronting an issue which is widely believed to have contributed to the party’s disastrous election result in 2017.The so-called dementia tax would have seen the cost of care provided at home being paid for out of a person’s assets – including property – if the cumulative value was over £100,000.May was forced into a u-turn following a backlash against the proposal, insisting there would be a limit on what someone would be expected to pay – despite a cap not being in the manifesto. whatsapp last_img read more

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Contactless card payments rise by a third with transaction limit set to increase

first_img A wider adoption of the technology on public transport and in more high street retailers is part of the reason. Read more: DEBATE: Is biometric technology the future for digital payments?The current payment limit with a contactless card is £30, more than which a Pin must be used. But an increase in usage throughout 2018 is expected to lead to an increase in that maximum, although those using Apple Pay are already able to spend more than that limit in most retailers.Payments on contactless debit cards were up 29 per cent last year too, with more than 6.3 payments made worth a total of £58bn, according to UK Finance, while there was increase in contactless credit card payments of 44 per cent. Contactless card payments rise by a third with transaction limit set to increase whatsapp Michael Searles Friday 15 March 2019 3:15 pm whatsapp Tags: Trading Archive Share Every two in five card payments are made with contactless technology according to new data. Contactless transactions rose 31 per cent year-on-year in 2018, data from banking trade body UK Finance revealed, demonstrating a growing confidence in paying without use of a Pin. More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.com by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikePast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past FactoryHealthyGem20 Hair Shapes That Make A Man Over 60 Look 40HealthyGembonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comPost FunA Coast Guard Spotted Movement On A Remote Island, Then Looked CloserPost FunNews SharperGrab A Tissue Before You See Richard Simmons At 72News SharperQuizscapeQuiz: 9 Out Of 10 People Can’t Name These Famous ComediansQuizscapeNext RefinanceThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryNext RefinanceTaco RelishPhotos Show The Differences Between Kate & Meghan’s Parenting StylesTaco RelishG InsuranceExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesG Insurance The average spent per transaction on any card by any means was £35. Read more: Natwest’s fingerprint payments let you override £30 contactless limit”Many of us are now reaching for our cards or mobiles rather than cash to make low-value purchases, as customers opt for the convenience and security of paying with contactless,” Eric Leenders, managing director of personal finance at UK Finance, said.”There has also been an increase in credit card use although growth in outstanding balances has slowed, suggesting many consumers are using their cards for day-to-day spending rather than as a means of borrowing.”It comes after a report earlier this month said that cash was at risk of disappearing without action from regulators and the government. last_img read more

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Mark Carney: 150,000 firms not fully ready for no-deal Brexit

first_imgBut the speech was overshadowed by an incident in which Tory MP Mark Field appeared to grab a climate change protestor and forcibly eject her from the room. “But it doesn’t mean they are fully ready, in fact far from it,” he added. James Warrington Carney last night spoke at the annual Mansion House bankers’ and merchants’ dinner in the City, in what was likely his last ever speech at the famous event. whatsapp Mark Carney: 150,000 firms not ready for no-deal Brexit The Bank of England governor said the companies still did not have the necessary paperwork and while many had built up contingency stocks, these would only last “weeks”. Carney also rejected a claim by Tory leadership frontrunner Boris Johnson, who said the UK could secure a 10-year grace period to avoid paying EU trade tariffs after a no-deal Brexit. The Bank of England boss instead stated the return of trade tariffs on goods shipped to the EU would be “automatic”. The outgoing governor praised Facebook’s proposed global payments system and said the Bank will carry out a stress test on financial institutions to see how they would cope with a climate crisis. “Business will be reliant on what the governments are able to do in order to keep the ports open, the trade flowing,” he told the BBC’s Today programme. LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 20: Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney delivers a speech during the annual Mansion House dinner on June 20, 2019, in London, England. Greenpeace volunteers wearing red evening dress with sashes reading “climate emergency” gatecrashed and disrupted the beginning of Chancellor Philip Hammond’s Mansion House speech. (Simon Dawson – WPA Pool/Getty Images) “We should be clear that not having an agreement with the European Union would mean that there are tariffs, automatically, because the Europeans have to apply the same rules to us as they apply to everyone else,” he said. Roughly 150,000 UK businesses are not ready to keep exporting to the EU in the event of a no-deal Brexit, Mark Carney has said. Read more: Mark Carney says investment funds could risk global economy amid Woodford suspension More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.com Read more: BoE’s Mark Carney cautiously welcomes Facebook’s new currency Libra Carney said the UK’s financial system would be resilient in the event of a no-deal Brexit, and that three-quarters of UK businesses have done as much as they can to prepare. Share whatsapp Friday 21 June 2019 8:48 am Tags: Brexitlast_img read more

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UK productivity drops for third quarter in a row

first_imgKatherine Kent, head of productivity at the ONS, said the productivity crisis had caused “sluggish wage growth in recent years”. LONDON – JULY 23: Workers at one of the 19 national pandemic flu service call centres in the country, answer calls from people concerned about swine flu, July 23, 2009 in London, England. Over 1500 people have been employed to man these call centres as concerns about swine flu increase. (Photo by Richard Pohle/WPA Pool/Getty Images) He added: “Many of the new jobs that have been created are in less-skilled, low-paid sectors where productivity is limited.” The first quarter figure was dragged down by a 0.9 per cent year-on-year fall in manufacturing productivity, the ONS said. Productivity in the service sector grew by 0.2 per cent. whatsapp Read more: Pound falls as UK economy shrinks by 0.4 per cent in April Labour productivity – output per hour worked – fell by 0.2 per cent year on year in the first quarter of the year, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said today. Howard Archer, chief economic adviser to the EY Item Club, said “under-investment and an inefficient allocation of resources” may be one of the factors to blame. Productivity levels are closely related to investment, as new technology and machinery helps workers do more work. Yet business investment has been declining in recent months, due largely to the uncertainty created by Brexit. Tej Parikh, chief economist at the Institute of Directors (IoD), said: “With political risks clouding business decisions, firms have lacked the confidence to invest in the equipment and technology that drive efficiency gains.” But the Bank of England has said productivity is around 20 per cent below where it would have been had it continued at pre-financial crisis levels. UK productivity fell for the third successive quarter in the first three months of the year, according to official figures released today, as Britain’s productivity crisis rumbled on. The figures show that Britain’s productivity crisis is continuing. Increasing productivity is central to improving living standards, as it creates wealth.  Harry Robertson Read more: Urgent action needed to tackle stagnating productivity, economists warn He said business leaders “want to see urgent progress on our skills agenda, infrastructure, and business support”. She said private sector workers have missed out on “an estimated average of £5,000 per year”. Friday 5 July 2019 10:43 am whatsapp UK productivity drops for third quarter in a row as crisis continues Tony Danker, chief executive of productivity campaign Be the Business, recommended businesses make “small improvements to boost performance by just two to three per cent per year”. Sharelast_img read more

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Banks can’t ignore the disruptors any longer

first_imgTuesday 17 September 2019 7:04 am Horta-Osorio warned that privacy concerns sparked by the banks could create a “confidence backlash” among the public.Be it the rise of data or the rise of fintechs, it is notable that two of the biggest challenges facing the whole banking sector are both technological: bankers now need to be tech wizards every bit as much as savvy money-lenders. “Standards will have to be developed for the ethical use of data and analytics,” said Lloyds banking group boss Antonio Horta-Osorio, who headlined yesterday’s event. whatsapp But today neo-banks, fintechs and payment providers are all giving the traditional high street lenders a run for their money, eating up a higher share of the market and piling pressure on their larger rivals. More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.com Inside one of the City of London’s oldest buildings, bankers are discussing the future. Amid trade war turmoil, Brexit uncertainty and climate change concerns, there is one issue above all that dominates the agenda; digitalisation. whatsapp Banks have been investing in new infrastructure and recruiting more people with data analytics skills, but the question of trust over privacy rights remains one of the industry’s biggest hurdles. It is a topic at the heart of the 23rd World Conference of Banking Institutes held at the City’s Guildhall, where corporate bigwigs and academics are meeting to discuss “the age of disruption”. Read more: Bank station commuters warned of travel chaos Sebastian McCarthy Read more: PPI costs account for over half of all conduct and litigation charges You only have to look at the adverts dominating the tube network to clock the dramatic rise of new digital banking products.A new report out this week from Accenture predicts that banks are set to miss out on as much as $280bn (£225bn) in payments revenue over the next six years if they do not adapt to shifts in the sector, with 18 per cent of UK banks’ payment revenue likely to be displaced.  It was not so long ago that the cumulative impact of many of the so-called ‘disruptors’ in the City barely amounted to a rounding error on the big banks’ operations. “The digital boom will mean banks have to fundamentally change the way they think about their revenue composition,” said Alan McIntyre, who heads up Accenture’s banking practice.Another new challenge from the digital boom was also raised in yesterday’s conference; data. Mountains of information are being used by the UK’s largest lenders to improve services and drive up customer retention.  Share Banks can’t ignore the disruptors any longer last_img read more

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Iranian leader says Saudi attacks were ‘warning’ from Yemenis

first_img whatsapp Wednesday 18 September 2019 9:23 am Read more: Saudi oil attack: How high could oil prices go after record-breaking rise? Iranian leader says Saudi attacks were ‘warning’ from Yemenis Iran this morning denied any involvement in a series of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil infrastructure over the weekend as the Saudis prepare to reveal “material evidence” of Tehran’s role. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatterUndoNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyUndoDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyUndoPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past FactoryUndozenherald.comDolly Finally Took Off Her Wig, Fans Gaspedzenherald.comUndoMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryUndoYourDailyLamaHe Used To Be Handsome In 80s Now It’s Hard To Look At HimYourDailyLamaUndobonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comUndoPost Fun25 Worst Movies Ever, According To Rotten TomatoesPost FunUndo Export tariffs, which were lifted as part of the deal, have been re-imposed on the Islamic Republic. According to reports, US analysts have identified the exact location in Iran where they think they drones and cruise missiles took off from. The Saudis have promised they will today reveal evidence that Iran was behind the attacks. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks during a joint press conference with Turkish and Russian counterparts following a trilateral meeting on Syria, in Ankara on September 16, 2019. (Photo by Adem ALTAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images) “We don’t want conflict in the region … Who started the conflict? Not the Yemenis. It was Saudi Arabia, the Emirates, America, certain European countries and the Zionist regime which started the war in this region,” he said. At a press conference this afternoon, the government is set to unveil “material evidence and Iranian weapons proving the Iranian regime’s involvement in the terrorist attack.” Read more: Oil prices post record jump after attack on Saudi Arabia supplies Tensions have been ratcheting up in the Middle East around the vital Strait of Hormuz for months. International ships have been attacked and seized and an Iranian drone shot down by the US over the strait which is a chokepoint for a fifth of global oil supply. Read more: Oil prices plunge as Saudi production could come back online sooner than expected Oil markets held fairly steady this morning after days of fluctuation. After Monday’s sharp rise, yesterday prices fell 6.5 per cent after the Saudis said their production would be up and running again sooner than expected. 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However other countries have asked for proof that Iran is to blame. Japan’s defence minister today said that he had not seen evidence of the claims. August Graham A Saudi-led coalition has provided air support to Yemen’s ousted government since 2015. Share Relations between Washtington and Tehran, always tense, soured last year when US President Donald Trump ripped up a 2015 deal aimed to preventing Iran from getting nuclear weapons. Saturday’s drone attacks on Saudi refineries knocked out half of the country’s oil production, pushing up global crude prices as much as 20 per cent on Monday. whatsapp Tags: Oil priceslast_img read more

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Brexit Super Saturday vote live: PM’s deal blocked as Letwin amendment passes

first_img13:32pm Former chancellor Ken Clarke, who has already spoken, offers more thoughts. He tells MPs that what we have before us is “undoubtedly a bad deal” and worse than that proposed by Theresa May. Brexit Super Saturday vote live: PM’s deal blocked as Letwin amendment passes Catherine Neilan We will be bringing you the news as it happens – keep refreshing to get the latest updates. 10:51am While MPs debate the merits and demerits of the deal Johnson has signed, and Brexit more generally, the message from Number 10 is clear – if you want no more delay, MPs must not back the Letwin amendment. Leader of the House Jacob Rees-Mogg has announced that Monday will see the publication of the Withdrawal Agreement Bill, so it’s not impossible that the UK will leave the EU on 31st October – but today’s vote definitely suggests it will be harder. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatterPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past FactoryNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyYourDailyLamaHe Used To Be Handsome In 80s Now It’s Hard To Look At HimYourDailyLamabonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBezenherald.comDolly Finally Took Off Her Wig, Fans Gaspedzenherald.com That means MPs could be sent home before the vote even happens. We would be failing in our duty if we did not take every strategy available to try and guarantee changes and alterations…. “On the one hand you can have all these checks and it doesn’t count as a hard border, and on the other you can have one camera and it does count as a hard border.” 10:29am: Former chancellor Philip Hammond is still wavering but appears to leaning towards backing the PM. “Before I decide to jump on the Prime Minister’s bus, I’d like to be just a little clearer on the destination,” he says. 9:44am – Prime Minister Boris Johnson is exhorting MPs to back the deal. He says it is an “historic opportunity to show the same breadth of vision as our European partners… by getting Brexit Done.” 12:59pm There’s bad (but probably accurate) news from the New Statement’s assistant editor George Eaton. But – he also says now the choice is very real. In the face of no deal, we should support this deal. 11:37am Former minister Alistair Burt, who lost the whip after he voted against the government last month, has said he willl not back the Letwin amendment. If a deal is passed today, the UK is on course to leave the European Union on 31 October – three and a half years after the referendum. We will then have a transition period which, as things stand, will last more than a year, in which to thrash out the future relationship, including our trading deal. 10:22am Former Conservative leader and arch Brexiter Iain Duncan Smith says he will back the deal. He calls on Oliver Letwin to remove his amendment, in order to give the people “a meaningful vote”. He adds: “We are cut off from the country which we belong…” David Gauke praised the PM for agreeing a deal but asks whether he ensure that a “deep and special relationship” is agreed with the EU before the implementation period comes to an end. 9:17am Eurosceptic Tory MPs, sometimes known as Spartans, are expected to back the PM. As things stand the vote on the Brexit deal is expected around 2:30pm. 13:57pm: Arch Brexiter Bill Cash says he will back the Prime Minister’s deal, despite having some reservations about key aspects of it. He doesn’t go into detail but says there are “signs of very great process” in regard to “sovereignty and consent” and that “Northern Ireland would benefit”. Super Saturday has descended into…. Soggy, Stupid Saturday. 12:56pm With just over 90 minutes left before the vote is expected to take place, here’s how the numbers are stacking up according to former government adviser Sam Freedman: 10:15am – Ken Clarke, father of the house and arch Remainer, has said he will back the deal. 10: 54am After the Speaker John Bercow said it was time to “uncork the Gauke”, the former minister has given his thoughts. 12:41pm Shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer has been doing a good job dismantling the government’s case for backing the deal. He’s just used Brexiter John Baron’s argument – that it keeps the door open ultimately for no deal, or at least to trade on WTO terms as proof that there are no guarantees on the future relationship. 12:53pm Oliver Letwin, he of the controversial amendment, has explained the thinking behind it. The pro-Remain former minister said it is to prevent Britain crashing out with no deal if legislation is not passed by Hallowe’en. Labour is expected to back the Letwin amendment alongside the Liberal Democrats, but there are some rebel pro-Leave left-wingers – called Lexiters – who have signalled their intention to vote with the government. Asked what he thinks about the Letwin argument, Wilson repeats his comments about the hard border. Then, in a tacit endorsement of the amendment, he adds: 11:53am Labour’s Caroline Flint – who has already said she will back the PM’s deal – describes the Letwin amendment as “a panic measure”. If no deal is passed today, the Benn Act will be triggered and an extension will be sought until 31 January. There is no guarantee the EU will agree to that, however. That’s not even taking into account the most likely never-ending discussions around our future relationship with the EU… The vote itself will go ahead, but Tory MPs will be told to go home because the amendment neuters the motion. We are still expecting a vote at around 2:30pm.center_img The numbers are incredibly tight. Will Johnson be able to pull off what Theresa May never could? The PM says the 14 month period to reach a free trade deal with the EU is sufficient even though it is “a blistering pace” 12:04pm Labour is whipping its MPs to support Letwin, in the hope it will force the Prime Minister’s hand and seek an extension to Article 50. This is not hugely surprising, and there doesn’t appear to be any huge consequences for those who rebel, which begs the question why Lexiters would fall in line. But it does give an indication of the direction of travel for today. 11:30am Numbers are tight but according to Matt Chorley of The Times, the government is currently edging it whatsapp He said the reason for the last three years of division was the competing feelings towards the EU – “sceptical” about greater integration, but “passionate and enthusiastic about Europe”. 14:50pm: The government has been blocked from having its Brexit deal pass today, after MPs voted in favour of a controversial amendment put forward by Oliver Letwin. 11:04am While the PM continues to defend his deal in the Commons, People’s Vote protesters are starting to gather outside Parliament – although the loudest single voice is a pro-Brexit protester who is shouting that it’s time to “Get Brexit Done. The PM agrees saying it would be great shame if the opportunity to have a meaningful vote “were to be taken away from us”.  It might feel as though we’ve said this a lot in recent months, but today really is a critical moment in the Brexit process. 10:45am Here is how the deal is going down among the electorate: A Downing Street source has told CityAM that the Brexit deal vote will be effectively pulled if the Letwin amendment passes (see below for details). 9:27am Are things over before they’ve even started? 13:30pm Theresa May resisting the urge to make snide comments, backs the PM’s deal. 11:05am: With characteristic modesty, the PM has said: “I think this deal is about as perfect as you can get in the circumstances, if I do say so myself.” He also claims Johnson’s argument that he is not putting a border in the Irish Sea is simply wrong. 12pm: It looks like the ERG-Spartans are backing Johnson’s deal. Brexit hardliner Mark Francois says no member of the ERG spoke against the deal at its meeting this morning. Owen Paterson has also said he will back it. 9:02 am Good morning from Westminster. Today MPs are sitting for a rare Saturday session in order to debate the 11th hour Brexit deal struck by Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Thursday morning. 13:37pm DUP’s Sammy Wilson is in full flow, telling MPs why he and (presumably) the rest of the unionist party will reject the deal: “If anybody tells me that does not represent economic, customs border between Northern Ireland and the rest of GB, I don’t know what a hard border looks like. Tags: Brexit Johnson is due to kick things off with a speech at 9:30am. MPs will then debate the deal – and possible amendments, including a controversial one tabled by Oliver Letwin, which could call the whole thing off. Share Johnson’s deal makes no provision for the future relationship, meaning the UK could still wind up trading on WTO terms – which is either a good thing, if you are pro-hard Brexit, or a bad thing if you want to maintain ties as much as possible. 12:23pm Outside the Houses of Parliament a large crowd of People’s Vote protesters is gathering. You can read the full story here. 15:10pm Well that’s it. Equally, some former Tories who had the whip removed when they voted against Johnson last month, could well rebel again. Boris Johnson’s last minute Brexit deal has been blocked, and he says he won’t “negotiate further delay”. Will he send a letter? Who knows. His spokespeople repeatedly refused to answer any questions on the matter. Saturday 19 October 2019 3:01 pm whatsapp One government source has told City AM that it would effectively “turn a meaningful vote into a meaningless one” – which is why MPs would be sent home. The Letwin amendment, which effectively means Prime Minister Boris Johnson will have to seek an extension, passed by 322 votes to 306. Letwin says – as he did earlier this week – that he will vote for the Withdrawal Agreement Bill when it lands. last_img read more

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