Coalition of consumer groups calls for new code of conduct for telecom

first_imgA new government-backed code of conduct is needed to protect consumers from common sales tactics used by the people and companies that sell telecommunications products, the Fair Communications Sales Coalition said Tuesday“Certain of the companies . . . claim that competition alone can fix unfair sales practices. This is unlikely in practice,” coalition representative Jennifer Chow told telecom regulators at a public hearing in Gatineau, Que.“When a customer is duped into a sale, there are usually significant early-cancellation costs that deter customers from leaving and this does not hurt the former company.”Chow also disputed the claim that internal guidelines and rules issued by companies are effective in prohibiting misleading, aggressive and unsuitable sales — saying actual sales practices are at odds with the values expressed by management.“Whether this situation is due to the companies’ loss of control of their sales force, lack of audits or oversight, negligence, wilful blindness — or even intention — is not relevant,” Chow said.“The results are what matter to consumers and the results are bad.”Chow’s comments were made at the second day of the CRTC’s public hearings into complaints of misleading and aggressive sales tactics.The Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission, the telecom industry’s regulator, has been ordered to look into allegations of misbehaviour by sales representatives and report to cabinet by the end of February.The coalition’s delegation — led by John Lawford, executive director of the Ottawa-based Public Interest Advocacy Centre — told CRTC commissioners that Canada would ideally follow Australia’s lead in establishing one mandatory, national code of conduct for providing and selling telecom services.But Lawford — who lobbied for this week’s public hearings — said it may be quicker to expand the role of the Commission for Complaints for Telecom-television Services, a private-sector body that works with CRTC.The industry-funded CCTS is mainly set up to resolve customer complaints about wireless and television service contracts but it is specifically excluded from dealing with product and service pricing or claims of false and misleading advertising.On Monday, CCTS commissioner Howard Maker said that data collected by his organization reveals just the “tip of the iceberg” without revealing what may be happening more broadly in the marketplace.“We know there’s a lot that’s under the water line that we don’t have access to — to see and to comment on,” Maker said in the first day of CRTC’s hearings.’Lawford said on Tuesday that he believes the complaint commission could oversee a new sales code on behalf of the CRTC — as it currently does with the government regulator’s separate codes for wireless and TV services.“I guess our long-term strategy, at least at PIAC . . . would be a telecommunications code (encompassing all products) like they have in Australia. That’s the end game,” Lawford said.“Getting to that stage may take some time. . . . The code that we are suggesting for right now, in effect, is an interim measure. It could be rolled into a larger code later.”Among suggestions for the sales code, Lawford said, would be a 15-day “cooling off” period after a contract is signed — not to be confused with a “trial period” of 30 or 60 days suggested by several other delegations to the CRTC hearing.“Because with a cooling off period, you don’t have to give any reason. . . . That helps cover a lot of these cases where there’s been a very grey-area sale that the consumer regrets,” Lawford said.“After that, we’re seeking protections if there’s misrepresentations or aggressions that could go past the 15 days.”Earlier Tuesday, a delegation that included Concordia University professor Kim Sawchuk and Montreal seniors advocate Anne Caines said that a 60-day trial period is necessary to protect people with limited money, such as the elderly.“They’re the ones that have everything at stake. If a bill goes up suddenly, they don’t eat. We hear this,” Sawchuk said.A 60-day window for ending a contract would give the customer time to receive their first monthly bill with the new service — and to discover mistakes, misunderstandings or deception, she said.Among the most common types of complaints heard by the CRTC and CCTS are about a “mismatch” between a sales promise compared with the price and service actually received. Other complaints included sales of products or services that are too complex or unnecessary and unilateral increases to service fees before the end of a contract.last_img read more

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Update on the latest in business

first_imgFINANCIAL MARKETSAsian shares advance following strong Wall Street finishBANGKOK (AP) — Shares rose in Asia on Thursday after a strong overnight finish on Wall Street. Traders were encouraged by a Wall Street Journal report saying the Chinese government might make changes to its “Made in China 2025” economic development plan.U.S. stocks failed to hang onto big gains still finished broadly higher as technology and health care companies rose. Stocks initially rallied after the Wall Street Journal reported that China’s government could make changes to its “Made in China 2025” economic development plan — a step that might ease friction between the world’s two largest economies. The S&P 500 index rose 0.5 per cent to 2,651.07. The Dow gained 0.6 per cent to 24,527.27. The Nasdaq composite jumped 0.9 per cent to 7,098.31. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks added 1.1 per cent to 1,455.32.British Prime Minister Theresa May won a no-confidence vote that had threatened to end her tenure. Lawmakers within May’s Conservative Party have expressed frustration over her negotiations of Britain’s departure from the European Union.Benchmark U.S. crude oil rose but remained below $51.50 per barrel.The dollar rose against the yen and the euro.ECONOMY-THE DAY AHEADMajor business and economic reports scheduled for today.WASHINGTON (AP) — Freddie Mac reports the weekly mortgage rates today.Also, the Treasury Department releases November’s federal budget.CHINA-HUAWEICanada says entrepreneur feared detained in ChinaTORONTO (AP) — A second Canadian man is feared detained in China in what appears to be retaliation for Canada’s arrest of a top executive of telecommunications giant Huawei. The possible arrest raises the stakes in an international dispute that threatens relations.Canada’s Global Affairs department on Wednesday said Michael Spavor, an entrepreneur who is one of the only Westerners to have met North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, had gone missing in China. Spavor’s disappearance follows China’s detention of a former Canadian diplomat in Beijing earlier this week.Spavor is a fluent Korean speaker with longstanding ties to the North through his company, Paektu Cultural Exchange. He was instrumental in bringing NBA player Dennis Rodman to Pyongyang in 2013 and has organized a number of tours and joint cultural projects with the North since then. His disappearance sparked immediate concern in the circle of people who travel to North Korea. Acquaintances said he was due in Seoul on Monday, but never showed up.Canada’s announcement came hours after Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said she was worried another citizen had been detained in China following Monday’s arrest of former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig in Beijing.At the root of the dispute is Canada’s recent arrest of Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, for possible extradition to the United States.A Canadian court on Tuesday released Meng on bail, confining her to Vancouver and its suburbs while she awaits possible extradition. The U.S. accuses Huawei of using a Hong Kong shell company to do business with Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions.VIRGIN GALACTICVirgin Galactic aims to reach space soon with tourism rocketMOJAVE, Calif. (AP) — Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic is gearing up to finally send its tourism rocket ship to the edge of space.If successful, it would be a major step toward the long-delayed dream of commercial space tourism.The next test flight could come as early as Thursday with two pilots taking Virgin Space Ship Unity high above California’s Mojave Desert.CEO George Whitesides said Wednesday they will try to exceed an altitude of 50 miles (80.4 kilometres), which Virgin Galactic considers the boundary of space. Whiteside said that’s the standard used by the U.S. Air Force and other U.S. agencies.That differs from a long-held view that places the boundary at 62 miles (99.8 kilometres.) But Whiteside cited new research that favours the lower altitude and said that as a U.S. company it will use the U.S. standard.Reaching the threshold of space would demonstrate significant progress toward the start of commercial flights that were promised more than a decade ago. Virgin Galactic’s development of its spaceship took far longer than expected and endured a setback when the first experimental craft broke apart during a 2014 test flight, killing the co-pilot.FARM BILLHouse passes farm bill, sending it to Trump’s deskWASHINGTON (AP) — The House has easily passed the farm bill, a massive legislative package that reauthorizes agriculture programs and food aid.The legislation has already passed the Senate and is now headed to President Donald Trump, who is expected to sign it.The measure is the result of months of negotiations by lawmakers. It does not make any significant changes to the food stamp program that serves nearly 40 million low-income Americans. Trump and conservatives had pushed to create new work requirements for food stamps, but the Senate rejected the idea.The bill reauthorizes agriculture and conservation programs, funds trade programs, expands support for struggling dairy farmers and legalizes the cultivation of industrial hemp. The House vote was 369-47.CHINA-ESPIONAGEUS suspects China in Marriott data breachWASHINGTON (AP) — Investigators believe hackers working on behalf of China’s main intelligence agency are responsible for a massive data breach involving the theft of personal information from as many as 500 million guests of the Marriott hotel chain.That’s according to a U.S. official briefed on the investigation, who spoke Wednesday to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity in order to discuss an ongoing investigation.The official says investigators suspect the hackers were working on behalf of the Chinese Ministry of State Security, based on. The official says investigators are particularly concerned about the breach in part because Marriott is frequently used by military and government officials.The hack included the theft of credit card and passport numbers over four years from guests who stayed at hotels previously operated by Starwood.NISSAN-GHOSN-COUPArrest of Nissan star Ghosn raises speculation over coupTOKYO (AP) — The surprise arrest of Nissan’s former chairman on charges of falsifying financial reports is providing a window into possible corporate intrigue at the Japanese automaker.Japanese media and some analysts have raised the possibility that the charges against Carlos Ghosn were engineered to sideline him and give Nissan an excuse to end a lopsided alliance with French automaker Renault SA.Renault dispatched Ghosn to Nissan in 1999 to help rescue Nissan Motor Co. It owns 43 per cent of Nissan while Nissan owns 15 per cent of Renault with no voting rights. Now, Nissan is more profitable than Renault. Talk of a merger between the two companies was raising resistance in Japan.Ghosn and an American executive, Greg Kelly, were arrested on Nov. 19 on suspicion of falsifying financial reports.UNITED AIRLINES-CEOUnited CEO: No more pilot training needed on new Boeing jetDALLAS (AP) — The CEO of United Airlines says his pilots don’t need any additional training on the new Boeing jet that is at the centre of the investigation into a deadly crash in Indonesia. Oscar Munoz says United’s pilots are prepared to respond to problems that might arise with automated systems on modern planes.Munoz spoke to reporters Wednesday and said the Boeing 737 MAX is safe and reliable.United — along with American and Southwest — uses the new Boeing model that was involved in the Oct. 29 Lion Air crash.Indonesian investigators are examining the role of faulty sensor readings from an anti-stall system in the accident, which killed 189 people.TRUMP LAWYER-INVESTIGATIONMedia firm that aided Trump won’t be prosecutedNEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. attorney’s office in New York says it won’t prosecute the National Enquirer’s parent company over its efforts to suppress an embarrassing story about Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign.The agreement was announced Wednesday shortly after former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen was sentenced to three years in prison.Cohen’s crimes included working with American Media Inc. to buy the silence of a model who says she had an affair with Trump. The president denies the affair.Like Cohen, the tabloid publisher admitted it was trying to influence the election by protecting Trump from a damaging story.As part of the deal, AMI acknowledged it made a $150,000 payment to the model “in concert” with the Trump campaign with the intent of influencing the election.It requires AMI to co-operate with federal prosecutors in any investigation.MOVIE PIRACY5 charged with running massive movie piracy ringLOS ANGELES (AP) — A Los Angeles federal grand jury has indicted five men who allegedly ran an international piracy ring that offered hundreds of stolen movies and TV shows online, including “Fifty Shades of Grey,” ”Godzilla” and “The Walking Dead.”Wednesday’s indictment alleges the men hacked computer systems used by Hollywood film production companies to steal digital files; recorded movie theatre screenings and obtained copies of movies sent to industry professionals.The ring allegedly had a server in France that contained 25,000 files including stolen movies, trailers, TV episodes and audio tracks.The men are charged with conspiracy, computer hacking, ID theft and copyright infringement. They live in the United Kingdom, India, Malaysia and the United Arab Emirates. None are in U.S. custody but the UK resident awaits trial on similar charges there.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Federal government failed to get oil moving prompted oil cut says Andrew

first_imgAlberta is ordering oil production cuts amounting to 8.7 percent of output to reduce a growing glut.Alberta Premier Rachel Notley has said that the rest of the world sells its oil at about $50 per barrel while Alberta fetches only $10.Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi says the federal government shares Alberta’s frustration and is asking the National Energy Board to make sure Canada’s oil pipelines are being used as efficiently as possible. WINNIPEG, M.B. – Federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer says Alberta’s decision to order a cut in oil production is a direct result of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s failure to get Canadian energy to market.Scheer says there were three pipeline projects in the works when Trudeau became prime minister, and none have come to fruition.He says a Conservative government would ensure pipelines are built by having clear and consistent rules for development, and a special ministerial representative to consult with Indigenous communities about such projects.last_img read more

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Trudeau Sohi meeting with workers at TMXs Edmonton terminal this morning

first_imgOTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is paying a visit to the Trans Mountain pipeline terminal in Edmonton this morning.It has been almost a month since Trudeau gave a second go-ahead to expanding the pipeline, after the courts overturned his government’s original approval.Trudeau and Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi —  who represents a nearby Edmonton riding — will meet with workers at the terminal, which is the start of the pipeline that carries Alberta oil to a terminal in Burnaby, B.C. The Liberal government spent $4.5 billion to buy the pipeline from Kinder Morgan Canada in 2018 in a bid to get the existing pipeline expanded despite significant political opposition in British Columbia.That plan hit the rocks in August 2018 when the Federal Court of Appeal said the government had not done a good enough job with either consultations with Indigenous communities or environmental reviews.Six British Columbia First Nations and at least two environment groups have filed new court challenges to the approval.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Govt appoints ViceAdmiral Karambir Singh Navy Chief

first_imgNew Delhi: Vice Admiral Karambir Singh was appointed as the next chief of naval staff, succeeding Admiral Sunil Lanba who retires on May 30, the Defence Ministry said on Saturday. Vice Admiral Singh, who is at present serving as the Flag Officer Commanding in Chief (FOC-in-C) of the Eastern Naval Command in Visakhapatnam, will be the first helicopter pilot to become Chief of Naval Staff.He will take charge as Navy Chief on May 31, the Defence Ministry said. Before taking over as FOC-in-C Eastern Naval Command in October 2017, Singh also served as Deputy Chief as well as Vice-Chief of Naval Staff. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsThe government made the selection following a merit-based approach and did not go with the tradition of appointing the seniormost eligible officer to the post, official sources said. Commander-in-Chief of the Andaman and Nicobar Command Vice Admiral Vimal Verma, who is senior to Singh, was among the contenders for the top post, they said. Besides Verma, the other contenders for the Navy Chief’s post included Vice Chief of Naval Staff Vice Admiral G Ashok Kumar, FOC-in-C of Western Naval Command Vice Admiral Ajit Kumar and FOC-in-C of Southern Naval Command Vice Admiral Anil Kumar Chawla, the sources said. While appointing the Army Chief too in 2016, the Government did not follow the long-held tradition of going by the seniority. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from ThursdayBorn on November 3, 1959, Singh was commissioned into the Indian Navy on July 1, 1980. He earned his wings as a helicopter pilot in 1982 and has flown extensively on Chetak and Kamov helicopters. Singh, who is a graduate of Defence Services Staff College (DSSC), Wellington, and College of Naval Warfare (CNW), Mumbai, hails from Jalandhar and is a recipient of the Param Vishisht Seva Medal (PVSM) and Ati Vishisht Seva Medal (AVSM). In his career spanning over 37 years, the Admiral has commanded four ships — Indian Coast Guard ship Chandbibi, missile corvette INS Vijaydurg, guided missile destroyers INS Rana and INS Delhi. Singh has also served as Fleet Operations Officer of the Western Fleet. His other important assignments include Chief of Staff of the Tri-Services Unified Command at Andaman and Nicobar Islands and Flag Officer Commanding Maharashtra and Gujarat Naval Area (FOMAG).last_img read more

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NYAY funds will come from pockets of chor businessmen Rahul

first_imgBokakhat (Assam): Congress president Rahul Gandhi said on Wednesday that funds for the ambitious ‘NYAY’ scheme will come from pockets of “chor” businessmen favoured by ‘Chowkidar’ Narendra Modi. Addressing a rally in the Upper Assam town of Bokakhat, Gandhi said the Congress, if voted to power, guarantees to deposit Rs 72,000 annually to 20 per cent poor Indian families under the NYAY scheme. “Modi had promised to deposit money in the accounts of people, but he has done it only in the case of some rich businessmen like the Ambanis. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details “The money (for NYAY scheme) will come from the pockets of ‘chor’ (thieves) like Anil Ambani, to whom Chowkidar Narendra Modi has given money during the last four years… We will deposit it in the accounts of the poor, particularly women, irrespective of their caste, class or religion,” he said. The party has promised to roll out the Nyuntam Aay Yojana (NYAY) scheme, under which Rs 72,000 would be deposited in bank accounts of the women belonging to poor families, annually. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday The Congress chief said the rich people employ ‘chowkidars’ (watchmen), which the prime minister has turned into for them. He said the country was witnessing the worst unemployment scenario and promised that his Congress party would ensure facilities for youths to start their own businesses. He also said the Congress, if voted to power, would not allow the contentious Citizenship Amendment Bill. The Congress will restore special status of northeastern states and bring in an industrial policy to make the region a manufacturing hub, he said. Gandhi also said the Congress committed to ensuring minimum wages for tea garden workers that PM Modi had failed to fulfil. Polling for the 14 Lok Sabha seats in Assam will be held in three phases, starting April 11.last_img read more

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Jet Airways employee jumps to his death

first_imgMumbai: A senior technician with Jet Airways allegedly committed suicide in Maharashtra’s Palghar district due to depression as he was suffering from cancer, police said Saturday. Shailesh Singh, 45, jumped off the terrace of his four-storeyed building in Nalasopara East on Friday afternoon, an official said. As per functionaries of Jet Airways Staff and Employees Association, however, Shailesh was facing “financial constraints” as employees of the grounded airline have not got salaries for a long time. “He was suffering from cancer and was undergoing chemotherapy. Prima facie, it seems he was suffering from depression due to the ailment,” the police official added. It was the first suicide of an employee since the airline suspended operations, these functionaries claimed.last_img read more

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Of press freedom and confident women

first_imgEducate yourselves on two buzzwords key to those who present news to you: censorship and freedom of expression; Trace the rise of television journalism and what it is now, in the words of a veteran journalist; And finally, learn why women must, and can, overcome people-pleasing. Here is a list of books, which you can add in your bookshelf: ‘War over Words: Censorship in India, 1930-1960’ by Devika Sethi Debates over freedom of expression make a significant chunk of the civic thought in a democracy like India. Censorship, too, has been an universal phenomenon throughout history. This book is about the history of censorship of publications in India over three crucial decades – encompassing the Gandhian anti-colonial movement, the Second World War, Partition, and the early years of Independent India. Also Read – The Puja carnival”In India, the contest over ideas and identities did not end in 1947; neither did the use of print as a means of disseminating views of various hues. Censorship, did not cease in 1947, and this book explores censorship of the printed word in India in the 15 years before and after independence from British rule,” the author wrote in the introduction. ‘The Indian Newsroom’ by Sandeep Bhushan The book, written by veteran journalist Sandeep Bhushan, asks pertinent questions of television journalism in its introduction, and tries to answer them in its pages: What caused the death of field-based reportage, and the marginalisation of reporters? What is access journalism, and what’s wrong with it? How did India evolve the star system? Also Read – Wave City brings special offers this NavratraIt goes on to ask: Is the reporter-editor relationship necessarily adversarial? How does the owner-editor system, perhaps unique to India, work in practice? And importantly, how does India compare to more mature industries, like those in the USA or UK? Expressing his thoughts over the changing face of TV journalism, the debut author has written in detail about studios, stars and the unmaking of reporters. ‘Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals’ by Rachel Hollis “…Like many other women, I’m still in the process of overcoming a lifetime of people-pleasing,” that’s how the founder of a lifestyle website, Rachel Hollis, introduces her new book ‘Girl, Stop Apologizing’. Hollis says that she has seen it too often: women not living to their full potential. The book, tailor-made for women who undersell themselves, identifies the excuses to let go of, the behaviours to adopt, and the skills to acquire on the path to growth, confidence and believing in yourself.last_img read more

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Ohio State womens soccer splits weekend matchups

Then-freshman forward Lindsay Agnew (18) dribbles the ball during a game against Eastern Michigan on Aug. 25, 2013, at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won, 2-1, in overtime.Credit: Lantern file photoTiming was everything for the Ohio State women’s soccer team this weekend. After late-game heroics guided the Buckeyes past Indiana on Friday night, two goals in the final 10 minutes denied them a point against Purdue on Sunday.OSU (4-4-0, 1-1-0) finished its first weekend of conference play with a 2-1 overtime win against Indiana (4-4-0, 0-2-0) and a 3-1 loss to Purdue (5-2-1, 1-1-0).The Buckeyes entered Sunday on a three-game winning streak but couldn’t capitalize on their momentum against the Boilermakers.Tied 1-1 at halftime, neither team could find the back of the net for the early part of the second half. Purdue sophomore forward Maddy Williams eventually broke the stalemate in the 81st minute with her second goal of the afternoon. Williams led a Boilermakers offense that outshot OSU 15 to 13 and six to four in shots on target.Both teams worked to use the width of the field in the first half. The strategy worked first for Purdue in the 33rd minute when Williams received a pass from the right flank and put it behind OSU redshirt-freshman goalkeeper Megan Geldernick.The Boilermakers nearly stretched their lead on a corner kick moments later, but sophomore defender Nicole Miyashiro made a save on the goal line to keep the Buckeyes within one.OSU leveled the score in the 41st minute when sophomore forward Lindsay Agnew’s shot from beyond the penalty box surprised Purdue freshman goalkeeper Erika Yohn and snuck inside the near post.Agnew’s tally was her first of the season and proved to be the Buckeyes lone goal of the afternoon.Defensively, OSU benefited from the return of junior defender Marisa Wolf who rejoined the Buckeyes back line against Indiana after missing the previous three games with a concussion. Wolf logged 158 minutes in her first weekend back.OSU made a splash in its Big Ten opener, beating the Hoosiers 2-1 in overtime. The Buckeyes trailed 1-0 until the final minute of play when OSU senior forward Kayla Varner converted a penalty kick with three seconds left in regulation.Junior midfielder Michela Paradiso notched the golden-goal in the 97th minute. Varner, fresh off her first goal of the season, provided the game-winning assist to cap her first multi-point game of the year.With the win against the Hoosiers, OSU coach Lori Walker recorded her 200th victory with the Buckeyes.The game marked the Buckeyes’ second overtime contest as it fell 1-0 to Toledo on Sept. 2nd.Walker said she was pleased with parts of her team’s play on Friday but said OSU needed to find more balance between possessing the ball and stretching the opposing defense.For the majority of the evening Indiana played a patient game, looking to capitalize on the Buckeyes’ mistakes, Walker said. The Hoosier’s lone tally came in the 38th minute off a corner kick.Geldernick made four saves against Indiana and added three more against Purdue.OSU is scheduled to close its three-game road swing against No. 8 Penn State (6-1-0, 2-0-0) on Friday. read more

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Baseball Ohio State beats No 16 Southern Mississippi splits between Nicholls State

Ohio State then-freshman second baseman Conner Pohl bats in the bottom of the seventh inning against North Carolina Greensboro. Credit: Edward Sutelan | Assistant Sports EditorThe Ohio State baseball team took a trip to Pensacola, Florida, this weekend for a trio of games as part of the Cox Diamond Classic.Riding 15 combined runs of offense to wins over Nicholls State and No. 16 Southern Miss in the first two games of the weekend — both wins, the Buckeyes ran out of steam and couldn’t recover from a shaky outing from redshirt senior starting pitcher Adam Niemeyer in the final game of the weekend against Eastern Michigan. Ohio State’s record now stands at 7-4 on the year.The Ohio State defense committed five errors across the three games this weekend, a small improvement from committing 12 in four games last weekend.Game 1: Nicholls StateIn the bottom of the fifth inning, Ohio State junior second baseman Brady Cherry stepped up to the plate with runners on first and second and jumped on the very first pitch. Pushing the ball to right field, Cherry cleared the fence for a three-run home run that put the Buckeyes up 5-1.It was more than enough for an Ohio State win over the Nicholls State Colonels (1-8) Friday by a final score of 6-3. Connor Curlis pitched a gem in his third start of the season for the Buckeyes, allowing just one earned run in 6.1 innings of work with seven strikeouts.Nicholls State sophomore catcher Kyle Knauth produced a large portion of the team’s offense, going 2-4 with a pair of RBIs and his second home run of the season.Ohio State junior shortstop Kobie Foppe put in a solid day’s work, going 2-3 with two RBIs. The transfer has been a pleasant offensive surprise for the Buckeyes so far this season, batting .353, 61 points higher than his best season at South Mountain Community College.Game 2: Southern MissThe Buckeyes went from down 6-3 to up 7-6 following a four-hit, four-run inning that included RBIs from junior catcher Jacob Barnwell, sophomore outfielder Dominic Canzone and a pinch-hitting freshman Dillon Dingler.With two insurance runs added in the ninth, senior reliever Seth Kinker delivered his third save of the season after a pair of shutout innings and sealed a 9-6 Ohio State win over the No. 16 Southern Miss Golden Eagles (7-3, 0-0 Conference USA) Saturday.As a whole, the Ohio State bullpen delivered four shutout innings with seven strikeouts spread between freshman Griffan Smith, redshirt senior Curtiss Irving and Kinker. Irving picked up the win (2-0).It was the usual suspects for Ohio State’s offense. Senior right fielder Noah McGowan, named national player of the week two weeks ago, scored four runs and batted home one more. Sophomore third baseman Conner Pohl left the yard for his third time this season as part of a 3-5 day. Canzone finished 3-5 with an RBI and a fourth stolen base on the season.Game 3: Eastern MichiganNiemeyer (0-2) gave up six runs, all earned, in just 3.1 innings of work before being relieved by redshirt senior Yianni Pavlopoulos. The offense sputtered and the Buckeyes suffered a 6-1 defeat at the hands of the Eastern Michigan Eagles (3-8, 0-0 MAC) Sunday.The Eagles enjoyed a big day from freshman designated hitter Jared Kauffman, who went 3-4 with two runs scored, an RBI and a stolen base.One bright spot for Ohio State was Pavlopoulos’s performance in relief of Niemeyer. The redshirt senior pitched 3.2 shutout innings.Junior designated hitter Andrew Fishel drove in Ohio State’s lone run of the game. read more

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