Singh hunts 5th first-class ton

first_imgGuyanese batsman, Vishaul Singh, who is currently touring Sri Lanka with West Indies A team says he will be pushing for his fifth first class century when play resume on the second day against Sri Lanka A at the Pallekele International Cricket Stadium.Speaking to Guyana Times Sport via social media, the petite 27 year old said he will look to get going again and continue in the same manner he has done since landing in Sri Lanka.In the first match the Georgetown Cricket Club (GCC) player top scored in both innings for his side with 96 in the first innings and 46 in the second. In this match he has already scored 81 not out on the first day and is insight of his fifth first class century. He has adapted quickly and is so far the most consistent batsman in his side.According to him the conditions are similar to the Caribbean so it is just a matter of making little adjustments at the different stadiums.Prior to the series Singh set himself a goal to achieve at least 300 runs with a century and two fifties. He is definitely on track to achieve the 300 runs but must score 19 runs on the second day to get his first century for West Indies A.In their second match of the series the West Indies ended their first day on 331-5 with wicket keeper batsman Jahmar Hamilton leading the way with 99 before being run out. While Singh, who remains unbeaten and Rajendra Chandrika 51 retired hurt have also scored fifties. West Indies under-19 captain Shimron Hetmyer fell two runs short of a half century.According to Singh the team has batted well as a group, they had a good start and partnerships throughout the day’s play. “The guys applied themselves well and got stuck in,” said Singh.Yesterday’s batting performance was West Indies A best so far in three innings and there are three more days remaining in this match, the second of a three match series. West Indies will be looking to level the series at the end of this match to set up a pulsating final encounter.last_img read more

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No end in sight for high oil profits

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventCrude-oil futures are trading near $72 a barrel. U.S. gasoline prices are above $3 a gallon in many places, and even have climbed above $4 in Southern California. Yet demand continues to rise. The trends have convinced Wall Street the 2006 earnings of the nation’s three largest oil companies will surpass last year’s combined record of nearly $64 billion. “It is hard to find any reason to be sympathetic toward the oil companies today, but that doesn’t make them evil,” said Robert Ebel, director of the energy program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. For their part, the oil companies have been emphasizing that they make far less money on each dollar of sales than many other industries that aren’t being excoriated for their capitalism. Taken together, Exxon, Chevron and ConocoPhillips made a profit of $8.19 on every $100 in sales. In contrast, Internet bellwethers Google Inc., Yahoo Inc. and eBay Inc. collectively turned a $19.20 profit on every $100 of their combined revenue. The oil industry’s massive first-quarter profits this week triggered another round of election-year outrage from President George W. Bush and members of Congress, who spoke up on behalf of angry constituents feeling pinched at the pump. There’s little that either lawmakers or the industry can do in the short-term about the high oil prices that yielded those profits, however, as long as energy markets stay tense and the global economy is expanding. Instead, it would take a decision by consumers and businesses to consume less fuel, a choice they have yet to make, analysts said. The country’s three largest petroleum companies – Exxon Mobil Corp., Chevron Corp. and ConocoPhillips – posted combined first-quarter income of almost $16 billion, an increase of 17 percent from the year before. In a bit of an understatement, Exxon Mobil’s vice president of investor relations Henry Hubble said “industry conditions remain robust.” Still, as important as the Internet has become, energy remains more vital. The combined first-quarter revenue of Exxon, Chevron and ConocoPhillips totaled $191.5 billion – more than the individual gross domestic products of 189 different countries, including the likes of Chile, Denmark, Peru and Venezuela, according to statistics compiled by the Central Intelligence Agency. Even as politicians snipe at the oil industry’s profits, the government has been sharing in the windfall from high gas prices. In the first quarter, Exxon, Chevron and ConocoPhillips turned over a combined $13.8 billion in sales taxes – about 7 percent of their total revenue. Chevron also is receiving a financial lift from a deal that Congress helped make last year. The San Ramon-based company bought rival Unocal Corp. for $18 billion eight months ago, prevailing over a higher offer from a bidder backed by China’s government. The Chinese bidder, CNOOC Ltd., withdrew after Congress threatened to block a Unocal sale to a company outside the United States. The Unocal acquisition is paying off even better than Chevron envisioned, executives said. “Our company is in an excellent position to continue adding value for our stockholders and helping to satisfy the energy needs of the world economies,” Chevron Chairman David O’Reilly said. Expanding on that theme, Bush, a former oil man, said Friday that he expects the industry to invest its huge profits in more oil production, refining and transportation capacity to help alleviate supply congestion. But oil companies already are spending more to search for oil even as they ramp up current production. Exxon, for instance, poured $4.8 billion into exploration and other other capital spending, a 53 percent increase from last year – but still less than the company spent on share repurchases. “There’s capital flowing into the sector unlike anything we’ve seen in recent years,” said Art Smith, chief executive of energy consultant John S. Herold. Nevertheless, it will take time to reverse two decades of cautious spending, he said. Senate GOP leaders unveiled a 10-point plan that included a $100 fuel-cost rebate for millions of taxpayers, rescinding oil industry tax breaks and opening an Alaska wildlife refuge to oil drilling – a longtime goal of several large oil companies. On the other side of the aisle, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., is asking the Federal Trade Commission to monitor refiners this summer, while Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., offered a bill that would require energy companies to pay a federal royalty on all oil pumped from the Gulf of Mexico if oil prices exceed $55 a barrel.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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