UK has record 56,000 Covid cases on last day of 2020

first_img whatsapp The UK has recorded 964 deaths from Covid on the last day of 2020 as cases continue to surge to record levels across the country. UK has record 56,000 Covid cases on last day of 2020 The government reported another 55,892 new Covid cases today – a new single day record for the country. Ambulances wait outside King’s College Hospital on Tuesday (Getty Images) Also Read: UK has record 56,000 Covid cases on last day of 2020 by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeUnify Health LabsRandy Jackson: “This Drink Is Like A Powerwash For Your Gut”Unify Health LabsLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorTaco RelishSuspicious Pics That Are Fishier Than The SeaTaco RelishPost FunGreat Songs That Artists Are Now Embarrassed OfPost FunMagellan TimesIf You See A Red Ball On A Power Line, Here’s What It MeansMagellan TimesZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldHealthCentralDon’t Ignore These 10 Symptoms—It Could Mean MSHealthCentralElite HeraldKate Middleton Just Dropped An Unexpected Baby BombshellElite Herald Thursday 31 December 2020 4:51 pm The total number of UK deaths from coronavirus has now hit 73,512, which is the sixth highest total in the world and the second highest total in Europe. Share whatsapp This number is expected to shoot up drastically over the next week, after the UK’s medicines regulator approved the Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine. There have been 14,959 Covid-related hospitalisations in the past seven days, which is a weekly increase of 19.4 per cent. There are already millions of doses of AstraZeneca jab ready to administer in the UK and it is far easier to transport and store as it does not need to be kept at -70 degrees like the Pfizer vaccine. “No one regrets these measures more bitterly than I do, but we must take firm action now,” he said. The Department of Health also reported today that 944,539 people in the UK have now received the first dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech coronavirus vaccine. Health secretary Matt Hancock wants the country soon to be vaccinating 2m people a week. Stefan Boscia Before the Open newsletter: Start your day with the City View podcast and key market data The government put three-quarters of the country into lockdown yesterday, with Boris Johnson saying yesterday the country needed to “redouble our efforts to contain the virus”. Ambulances wait outside King’s College Hospital on Tuesday (Getty Images) Also Read: UK has record 56,000 Covid cases on last day of 2020 Ambulances wait outside King’s College Hospital on Tuesday (Getty Images) Show Comments ▼last_img read more

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In an overlooked corner of pharma, drastic price hikes hit medicines for radiology scans

first_img [email protected] “They have a monopoly,” said McClure, who operates Nuclear Apothecary in St. George, Utah, one of about 110 independent nuclear pharmacies that prepare and dispense vials of medicines to hospitals. “If you don’t sign the contract, you don’t get the product. So we did. But prices have gone up exponentially … and this has had a deleterious effect.”These pharmacies, which operate in a largely overlooked corner of the pharmaceutical world, may not be the only ones that will suffer consequences, though.advertisement Related: Lawmakers chide Trump for seeking to ‘scale back’ hospital discount drug program Privacy Policy Three years ago, pharmacist Dennis McClure was stunned by news from a key supplier.The cost of two widely used radiology medicines that his pharmacy sells to hospitals for performing lung and kidney scans jumped between 500 percent and nearly 1,800 percent. Earlier this year, he received yet another jolt — prices not only rose again, but the supplier sent a long-term contract requiring him to purchase a minimum amount of another of its medicines, as well.McClure believes the supplier, Jubilant DraxImage, acted unfairly, but felt he had to take the deal.advertisement Stung by surging prices, hospital pharmacies cut back on pricey drugs Related: Now, though, the Jubilant contracts that went into force earlier this year prevent the pharmacies from engaging in what is called anticipatory compounding. As a result, the pharmacies can only purchase enough of the Jubilant medicines to fill specific orders and, unless a hospital orders several doses, any leftover medicine is likely to be wasted.The upshot: Pharmacies must spend more to keep customers.“This has really hurt small pharmacies,” said Tom Wilkinson, who runs Austin Nuclear in Austin, Texas. “We don’t do the volume that a large operator does. From one vial of MAA, we may only get three doses, because we have fewer orders in a short period of time. The bigger guys can get up to seven doses from each vial. But if you can’t supply that product to a customer, that customer will go someplace else.”Some hospitals are also feeling pinched.The Cleveland Clinic Foundation is eating the higher costs, but spending less elsewhere, said Shashi Khandekar, the administrator for the imaging institute department. The 2014 price hikes added an extra $1 million to her $5 million budget. This may appear to be a small amount for a large hospital system, but it can mean delaying the purchase of new, state-of-the-art equipment. Evan Vucci/AP By Ed Silverman June 29, 2017 Reprints ExclusiveIn an overlooked corner of pharma, drastic price hikes hit medicines for radiology scans Related:center_img Some doctors and hospital administrators suggest there are negative implications for patient care. Why? Cash-strapped facilities may use other types of scans that do not require these increasingly costly medicines to diagnose patients. But some other scans could also pose health risks.Meanwhile, legal experts say the Jubilant contracting may be problematic. “The bundling sounds like a potential antitrust violation, particularly if their product has the dominant share of the market,” said Herbert Hovenkamp, a University of Iowa law professor and antitrust scholar.State and federal authorities have, in fact, been alerted to the concerns, according to sources familiar with the matter, although there is no indication that official probes are underway.A spokeswoman for Jubilant — which is a unit of Jubilant Pharma in India — declined to comment, citing a regulatory quiet period relating to its planned acquisition of the Triad Isotopes nuclear pharmacy chain.This is only the latest incident in which rising drug prices are prompting heightened scrutiny of the pharmaceutical industry. In the last few years, numerous drug makers — big and small — have been investigated by Congressional committees, as well as state and federal investigators, in response to higher medicines costs and, in some cases, questionable competitive practices. @Pharmalot About the Author Reprints Please enter a valid email address. Ed Silverman “One year, you’re paying the cost of a few lattes and the next year, you’re paying the cost of a whole cell phone bill,” explained Danielle Holtz, a CCF sourcing analyst. “You have to look for savings somewhere.”Some hospitals may not be able to absorb the costs as easily, though, said Dr. Mark Tulchinksy, a radiologist at Penn State Health’s Hershey Medical Center. To cope, a hospital can use CT scans for examining lungs. These are less expensive than ventilation perfusion scans, which require the Jubilant medicines.But this raises another issue, since a CT scan exposes patients to more radiation.“A lot of hospitals still use [the VQ] as an absolute necessity,” he said. “And I still use it myself, but not for every patient. I try to do so very sparingly. … No amount of radiation is trivial. But this is how the health system responds. The type of test used for diagnosis can be switched purely on economic grounds. There’s no data to substantiate it, but I do think there’s been considerable fallout in patient care. And it started with the price hikes.”This story was updated to reflect Jubilant comment referring to an upcoming acquisition. Leave this field empty if you’re human: This particular episode began in January 2014, when Jubilant saw an opportunity to raise prices.The Jubilant medicines are sold in powder form to nuclear pharmacies, which add a solution before filling orders from hospital radiology departments. A vial of MAA, which radiologists use for lung scans, rose from between $20 to $30 to between $350 and $450, depending upon quantities purchased. And DPTA, which is used for kidney scans, increased from between $20 to $30 a vial to between $130 and $160, depending upon quantities bought.During a May 2014 conference call, however, Rajagopal Sankaraiah, the Jubilant chief financial officer, told investors these were “not just mere price hikes.” The company, he explained, was in a “very enviable position,” because Jubilant is a “single source” supplier, which means there are no other suppliers from which nuclear pharmacies could purchase the medicines (see page 8).The pharmacies had little choice but to pass on a portion of the higher costs to hospitals, but those price hikes seem to have escaped wider notice. Now, though, some pharmacy owners said the combination of still more price hikes — MAA and DTPA each rose about 70 percent this year — and tightened contract requirements will have repercussions.How so?Many of these smaller nuclear pharmacies serve rural or less-populated markets where hospitals may not have much need to conduct a large number of lung or kidney scans on a regular basis. In the past, the pharmacies could order a certain amount of MAA or DTPA from Jubilant in advance of hospital orders and prepare numerous doses in each vial, which can only last up to about 12 hours. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Meet the lawyer trying to pry drug pricing secrets out of Big Pharma Newsletters Sign up for Pharmalot Your daily update on the drug industry. Tags diagnosticsmedical technologiesSTAT+last_img read more

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Nukes and missiles and sanctions, oh my! – Kathy Moon on…

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Tracking the “unidentified yellow substance” being dried out near the Yongbyon Nuclear Center Facebook Twitter Nukes and missiles and sanctions, oh my! – Kathy Moon on North Korea Daily NK [DNK]: Does Kim Jong Un lack the strategicsense of his predecessors? What are the ramifications of that in terms of NK’swillingness to provoke its neighbors and how the U.S. and allies shouldrespond?Dr. Moon [DM]: We see these patterns of nuclear tests,launches, provocations. We don’t have a lot of tools in the toolbox for ourresponse. And we shouldn’t lump them together. We need to ask ourselves whateach individual provocation means in comparison with what happened during the1994 crisis with his father (Kim Jong Il) and further back with hisgrandfather’s intentions for nuclear capability. It is better analysis to ask,‘Are the intentions the same? Are the motivations the same? Are theramifications the same?’ To some extent the answer is no. For Kim Jong Il’sregime, nuclear weapons helped rocket North Korea into the nuclear club byleapfrogging other forms of technological, military, and economic development.I don’t think Kim Jong Un’s regime is acting out with the sole goal of gettingthe U.S.’s attention. They’ve already done that. Kim Jong Un is less interested in using thenuclear program as a bargaining chip to get other goodies, whereas under hisfather’s rule, the nuclear program was negotiable, especially during the BillClinton era. We almost got denuclearization toward the end of Clinton’spresidency. I don’t think this regime is willing to negotiate the program away.The best the U.S. can expect is some sort of cessation of tests and enrichmentfor the near future and then serious disarmament talks. But one problem is thatdisarmament talks are reserved for nuclear states. We’re in a dilemma, becausewe don’t acknowledge North Korea as a nuclear state, but it is a de factonuclear state. At the same time, Pyongyang is not interested indenuclearization. Not only has North Korea invested a lot of money and prestigeinto its nuclear program, this has become the regime’s raison d’etre. Theleaders don’t want to throw it away. It’s called the sunk cost fallacy ineconomics. [DNK] B.R. Myers responded to your recentarticle in the Atlantic. He tries to point out a substantive difference betweenyour points of view about the Kim regime’s motivation for pursuing nuclearweapons. He thinks that the nuclear arsenal is about preparing to complete KimIl Sung’s mission of unification by force. How do you feel about that?Strategically, why does North Korea continue to pursue, develop, anddemonstrate nuclear weapons?[DM]: I think in terms of domestic legitimacy andmaintaining power, of course, that’s a given. But what size nuclear arsenal dothey have to develop to buy domestic legitimacy and support for the regime?North Korea does not have a full nuclear arsenal, but in a society that can’tindependently assess the government’s capabilities, you don’t need an excessiveamount of warheads to demonstrate power to your people. You just need to havethe myth of success and achievement so that the domestic audience believes thatthe regime is powerful. The current amount is sufficient for that purpose. So Idon’t get why they are in “roll out mode,” with the alleged H-bomb test and themissile launch and more in the works. Does Kim Jong Un really need all that tobeat his chest at the Party Congress in May? There are other things at play. Both NorthKorea and South Korea have their rhetoric about unification. The regime maywant to believe that provocations will lead to a unification more along theirlines, as a bargaining chip or something. If you talk to common North Koreansin Pyongyang, many can give you a whole speech about how glorious the countryis, but over time, they are the first ones who will fess up, “We know that theSouth has wealth, highly developed technology, capital, etc. We know we arevery poor and underdeveloped.” The North Koreans who have some access to outsideinformation and can engage in comparative thinking are not clueless. Which means the regime is not clueless. As reckless as they act, theyknow the facts on the ground. They know how powerful the South Korean economyis. So unification to absorb the South that accords with the North’s vision isa pipe dream. I don’t think North Korean elites are that silly. [DNK]: You spoke about using sanctions or othermeans to target the donju (new rich class) as a way to destabilize the regime.There are some who argue that the donju’s growing power reflects thegovernment’s weakened grasp on the economy. If the aim is to target anddestabilize the regime, do we want a strong or weak donju class?[DM]: I don’t seek instability in North Korea. Wedon’t want to have mass chaos on the peninsula. We’ve tried focusing sanctionson the hyper-elite, the very few who surround the Kim family and form the mainpillars of their power. We’ve tried going after luxury goods. But they’re notgoing to complain about not being able to buy the Rolex they want because a)their heads could roll and b) they’re a constituent part of the regime. Theywon’t rock the boat. Besides, how many Rolex watches and Mercedes cars can oneuse? But the new rich class is not part of theestablishment in the same way. They benefit in many ways from the regime butthey also use the regime. In my view, that very small group of newly richpeople in Pyongyang choose to endure political oppression because they haveaccess to a better lifestyle.  I call them “lifestyle elites.” So if wemake it harder for them to pursue this lifestyle, they have to question thedirection of the country. The Kim Jong Un regime is very cautious with thisgroup. He gives them room to make money but also keeps them politically at bay.But if they were to realize how vulnerable they are to sanctions and the longterm maintenance of their new social position, perhaps they could startsignaling to the hyper-elite that real economic development is contingent uponpolitical reforms. In terms of not hurting commoners, I don’t support sanctionsthat hurt those who are eking out a living and that is what I am afraid mighthappen. If we squeeze the hyper elite, they’ll respond by grabbing more fromthe ordinary people. Even during the great famine in the 1990s, the regimeinitially refused international aid. We don’t want to create a situation inwhich we prompt the regime to create even more hardship for ordinary people. [DNK]: Prospects for the announcement ofeconomic reforms at the 7th Party Congress in May?There are some commentators who argue thatNorth Korea’s use of the nuclear arsenal is meant to keep domestic society atbay, conserve funds for economic development, and serve as military deterrenceto compensate for the dilapidated nature of their military equipment. There’s achance that the regime is doing that. The problem is that even if they aretrying to save on military spending by developing and demonstrating theirnuclear capability every once in awhile, the reality is that they still lackthe capacity, human resources, facilities, and infrastructure that allow foreconomic development to take off. North Korea is not in a position to do thaton its own. And they can’t do it only with China’s help either. In order forthe North Korean economy to really be viable in the way that Kim Jong Un talksabout “Prosperity for North Korea,” they’ll need to be connected to the outsideworld, get skills and technology training, foreign investment, and access tointernational funding sources such as the World Bank, IMF, etc. This can’t bedelivered solely by China or by Russia and it cannot be home-grown in NorthKorea. This is another danger point thatdistinguishes Kim Jong Un from Kim Jong Il. Kim Jong Il had an understandingthat North Korea is an underdog. But Kim Jong Un has expressed arrogance thatextends beyond the usual pride over the nuclear push and economic growth thatthe country has been able to achieve in the past few years. That makes meparticularly nervous. Because just a few piecemeal changes don’t amount to thekind of fundamental changes that they need in order to prosper. At this point,who’s going to help? They’ve alienated even those who are traditional engagers. [DNK]: How do you think China will respond toNorth Korea’s provocations in the long term?[DM]: China needs to come up with a nuanced wayof using the leverage they have. They should not cut off oil, fuel, and food inone day. But they can play with it to signal to Pyongyang, “You’re really luckythat we’ve been putting up with you,” by reducing fuel by 10%, 20% for alimited time, on and off, etc. A nuanced and graduated policy is better. Theydon’t have to do anything dramatic. We don’t want drama on the peninsula. Butit’s no longer possible for China to just sit tight. There has to be a clearconcerted signal sent by all neighboring countries, “Here are the limits.”China’s red line is whatever hurts Chinese interests. The people on the borderhave become concerned about radiation contamination. They’ve seen cracks in schoolbuildings from the alleged H-Bomb test. The residents have to communicate totheir government that the situation is causing anxiety and putting the people’ssecurity at risk every time the North tests nuclear devices near the border. [DNK]: How will South Korea’s policies towardsthe North change as a result latest provocations? Will the national assembly topass the North Korean Human Rights Act? How should we interpret the closing ofthe Kaesong Industrial Complex?[DM]: You never know with South Korean politics.Relative to the prelaunch period, they’ve run out of ways to deal with NorthKorea. Closing Kaesong is a significant symbolic move. It represents a huge seachange given the importance of Kaesong for South Korea’s policy towards theNorth. It was a lynchpin. By closing Kaesong, the government is admitting thatno carrots have worked. Kaesong was the biggest carrot so far. Given that,you’re left with sticks. So the Human Rights Act legislation would be a stick.Of course, you’re going to have some progressives criticizing and opposing it.But even if the Human Rights Act passes,* I don’t foresee any substantive changein South Korea’s policy towards the human rights of North Koreans. I don’tthink there will be much flesh to the skeletal change. In terms of the generalpopulation’s support for these kinds of activities, I don’t think that therecent test and launch has changed the cautiousness of South Koreans. Theydon’t want to invite significant change that would have negative consequencesfor South Korea. I think that general cautiousness will continue – Don’t rockthe boat too much, but don’t make it easy for the regime either.  [DNK]: Do you see women’s increasedparticipation in the markets and bringing in the family income causing largerchanges in the direction of gender equality?[DM]: Because of the difficulty of doing fieldresearch, it is really hard to know. We don’t know how the money that’s earnedis actually used at home. How much goes to food? How much goes to women’shealthcare versus the drinking habits of their husband? This happens indeveloping countries as well, even those with micro credit access. If the moneyis spent in an unproductive way, that’s not useful. I don’t see North Koreangender roles as being significantly different from those in other hardshipsettings. I think if we look deeply and study women’s roles in other hardshipsettings and then compare with the North, we’ll see that it’s variations on atheme, rather than a totally different theme. The real power issue is that when womenstart making money, they hope that they will play a larger role in thedecisions making and have more access to other resources. The general tendencyis for the men, especially the husbands and the fathers, to crack down on it,to resist it, because their power is being challenged. So it’s possible thatwomen’s increased economic status could lead to increased incidents of domesticviolence. That’s very possible. If gender roles and expectations don’t changegenerationally, there can be frustration. I visited North Korea three years agoand met a young woman, about 25 years old, who graduated from a university andwas working at a highly desirable job. She was from an elite family inPyongyang. She told me that she wants to marry her boyfriend but unenthusiasticabout having to live with in-laws and be a “servant” in their home of herhusband’s parents, a prospect that did not sound appealing to her at all. Onthis issue, I thought how easily North Korean and South Korean women would beable to understand each other. I told her it’s the same in the South. [DNK]: Is there something that we should bepaying attention to in North Korea but aren’t?[DM]: In the media, academia, and policy circles,I think we all have to will ourselves to be more curious about North Korea as aplace with history and culture. I don’t mean Communist, Kim Il Sung,revolutionary history, I mean hundreds of years of history. We don’t haveknowledge about what culture is in North Korea. My mom is writing a memoirabout being born in the North pre-division, and I am helping her out with that.The people who came out of North Korea before or during the war to settle inthe South were very different from the Southerners they encountered. These arestrong-willed, tough people, and they pushed and pushed to develop South Korea.The stories of northern Korea that I grew up with—memories of my mother’schildhood in Kanggye were healthy and wholesome.They focused on nature, the mountains, the special foods they ate, the gamesthey played. When I talk about history and culture, thepoint is to humanize the place. It is very difficult for foreigners tounderstand the current situation when we regard them as a history-less,culture-less people. We too often see it as a rootless place. [She points to amovie poster of the controversial film ‘The Interview’ that is hung up in heroffice as a humorous jibe at the American tendency to caricature North Korea]This is what we think. We only see them as a people with an overbearing state,and a history that the state made up. But North Korea is more than that. I’dlike to see scholars and journalists try to dig out the real history, not theone that the Kim family manufactured. We need to find that history again sothat the Northerners can reclaim it. We can’t have a successful, healthyunified Korea in the future if half of its population doesn’t have access totheir own history. It’s necessary for political reasons as well. [DNK]: So the strategic culture isn’t just anoffshoot of the Cold War context?[DM]: No, why would it be? Why wouldn’t northernKorea’s long threads of history come to bear on the DPRK’s economic culture,strategic culture, and their psychological culture? It wasn’t just created in avacuum by Kim Il Sung and it’s not a matter of brainwashing. If we look atNorth Korea as a culture-less place, that’s a mistake. We can’t understandNorth Korea without looking deeper. Kim Jong Un may seem obnoxiously tough andbrazen from the point of view of a foreigner, but it fits into northern Korea’sculture of endurance and resilience. If we think that sanctions will bring themto their knees, we’re mistaken. AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] Is Nuclear Peace with North Korea Possible? By Daily NK – 2016.03.15 3:07pm Daily NK recently sat down for ano-holds-barred conversation with Kathy Moon on nuclear politics andprovocations, strategic culture and marketization, international response andthe importance of using history to steer policy. Interview highlights include anuanced suggestion for sanctions, the dangerous arrogance of the Kim Jong Unregime, and a look at how women’s roles might be changing in North Korea. KathyMoon is the SK-Korea Foundation Chair in Korea Studies and senior fellow at theBrookings Center for East Asia Policy Studies and a professor of politicalscience at Wellesley College. center_img Analysis & Opinion Analysis & Opinion SHARE Analysis & Opinion Analysis & Opinion Image: The Brookings Institution Pence Cartoon: “KOR-US Karaoke”last_img read more

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Pre-sale delivery of Fund Facts gets support from OSC investor panel

first_img James Langton CSA decides on standard deviation to classify riskiness of funds Keywords Fund FactsCompanies Ontario Securities Commission AMF finds deficiencies in “Fund Facts” review Related news OSC grants relief from Fund Facts delivery to two firms Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The Ontario Securities Commission’s (OSC) Investor Advisory Panel (IAP) has come out strongly in favour of the Canadian Securities Administrators’ (CSA) move to require pre-sale delivery of the new Fund Facts disclosure documents, saying that it will improve client-advisor relationships, and investor results. In a comment letter to the CSA dated April 30, 2014, the IAP says that it applauds the regulators for “introducing this meaningful disclosure regime”. It notes that “Post-sale delivery of Fund Facts never met the regulatory intent of disclosure.” The Fund Facts disclosure regime was originally created in a bid to make disclosure clearer and more useful, and to improve investors’ ability to compare the fundamental features of mutual funds and segregated funds. However, industry objections to the original pre-sale delivery requirements led the CSA to adopt a staged approach to implementing the new regime; and, as a result, it has yet to require pre-sale delivery. Now, the CSA is proposing to require pre-sale delivery for all mutual fund sales, subject to a limited exception where the client demands immediate trade execution (the comment period closes May 26). The IAP says that the move to require pre-sale delivery of Fund Facts lines up with the disclosures that will be required under phase two of the Client Relationship Model reforms (CRM 2). “The key CRM 2 requirements include pre-sale disclosure of fees, as well as trade confirmation and client statement disclosure requirements,” it notes. The panel endorses the CSA’s proposed approach to requiring pre-sale delivery of Fund Facts, and stresses that any situations where the exception is invoked, the dealer should document the request, and the client should receive verbal disclosure of the salient features of the recommended fund. It also suggests that pre-sale delivery should not be required for discount brokerage clients. “The very definition of a DIY investor is that they do their own research and analysis,” it notes. “We recommend instead that the CSA mandate a series of funds tailored to the DIY investor that can be purchased without trailing commissions.” Additionally, the IAP says that the Fund Facts disclosure approach should be extended to other sorts of investment funds, such as exchange-traded funds, and, “to the greatest extent practicable, be harmonized with similar products in the banking and insurance sectors.” It also recommends that the CSA prepare a companion guide for investors on how to use Fund Facts to make investment decisions. And, it reiterates its concern with one of the key elements of the Fund Facts, the disclosure of risk. “We believe the proposed risk disclosure based on standard deviation is misleading and inadequate,” it says. The CSA is considering changes to the risk disclosure component of Fund Facts. “The panel strongly supports the CSA in requiring pre-sale delivery of Fund Facts,” the IAP concludes. “Pre-sale delivery of Fund Facts will increase investor protection, improve the investor-registrant relationship and yield better outcomes.” Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Auditors face new challenges: CPAB

first_img Audit quality in Canada remains a challenge: report James Langton Innovations such as blockchain and artificial intelligence (AI) and the emergence of new industries, including cannabis and cryptocurrency, are posing new challenges to auditors, says the Canadian Public Accountability Board (CPAB) in its new strategic plan, unveiled on Wednesday.The CPAB’s strategic plan for the next three years says that the organization expects the audit environment in 2021 “will require an agile and progressive regulator keenly focused on improving audit quality and heightening investor protection.” Related news Keywords AuditorsCompanies Canadian Public Accountability Board To get there, the audit regulator says it intends to “pursue innovation, continuous improvement and next generation audit quality while engaging with the stakeholders that impact and depend on audit quality.”Among the forces that are expected to transform auditing and audit regulation in the years ahead, the CPAB points to technology-driven innovation.“Enabling disruptors such as new technologies and new businesses will reshape the audit as we know it,” the strategic plan says, noting that blockchain technology and AI “create opportunities to improve financial reporting and audit quality, but pose risks as well.”In addition, the development of new industries, such as the fast-growing cannabis industry and phenomena such as cryptocurrency, pose “new audit and financial reporting challenges,” the strategic plan says.To deal with these issues, the CPAB says it will proactively assess the use of AI, analytics and other new tools in the audit process; examine the risks posed by new industries; and help set standards for dealing with these technologies and novel audit challenges.The CPAB also aims to enhance its regulatory model through public communication of audit oversight findings and reviewing its toolkit, including assessing its disciplinary and communication mechanisms. CRA resumes full range of audit activities Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Calculator pen, balance sheet and statistics for sales and taxes ginasanders/123RF CPAB calls on auditors to establish sound cryptoasset practices Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Petrojam to Supply Cleaner Diesel Fuel

first_imgRelatedPetrojam to Supply Cleaner Diesel Fuel RelatedPetrojam to Supply Cleaner Diesel Fuel Advertisements Story HighlightsThe country’s state-run oil refinery, Petrojam, will be supplying low-sulphur diesel fuel to the public later this year.Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, says the move comes as Government continues to take steps to reduce the negative effects of motor vehicle exhausts on the environment.“I am very much aware of the problem with sulphur content in diesel and I have mandated Petrojam, to start importing clean diesel by the middle of this year, so we can stop having those ill effects of our SUVs (Sports Utility Vehicles) and diesel driven vehicles,” he stated. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail center_img RelatedPetrojam to Supply Cleaner Diesel Fuel The country’s state-run oil refinery, Petrojam, will be supplying low-sulphur diesel fuel to the public later this year.Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, says the move comes as Government continues to take steps to reduce the negative effects of motor vehicle exhausts on the environment.“I am very much aware of the problem with sulphur content in diesel and I have mandated Petrojam, to start importing clean diesel by the middle of this year, so we can stop having those ill effects of our SUVs (Sports Utility Vehicles) and diesel driven vehicles,” he stated.Minister Paulwell was speaking on Tuesday, February 19, at a Jamaica Chamber of Commerce (JCC) breakfast forum at the Knutsford Court Hotel, New Kingston.Low-sulphur diesel has reduced sulphur content, providing for cleaner and more refined fuel.Vehicles that use diesel with high sulphur content require more frequent oil change and regular servicing to maintain optimal efficiency. Petrojam to Supply Cleaner Diesel Fuel EnergyFebruary 20, 2013Written by: Chris Pattersonlast_img read more

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Government Appoints CIO to Push ICT in Public Sector

first_imgGovernment Appoints CIO to Push ICT in Public SectorJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Advertisements Story HighlightsIn the continued effort to improve service delivery, Government has appointed a Chief Information Officer (CIO) to improve the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) within the public sector.The new CIO is Dr. Louis Shallal, who was recently appointed in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining.Chairman of the Public Sector Transformation Steering Committee, Pat Francis, made the announcement while speaking at a recent Jamaica House media briefing to highlight achievements under the Public Sector Transformation and Modernisation Programme. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail In the continued effort to improve service delivery, Government has appointed a Chief Information Officer (CIO) to improve the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) within the public sector.The new CIO is Dr. Louis Shallal, who was recently appointed in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining.Chairman of the Public Sector Transformation Steering Committee, Pat Francis, made the announcement while speaking at a recent Jamaica House media briefing to highlight achievements under the Public Sector Transformation and Modernisation Programme.“The Chief Information Officer has been appointed for one year. He comes from Canada with a great reputation of having done a similar kind of thing. His job is to make sense of all we have been doing in the past, rationalise it and put it into a structure,” she said.Mrs. Francis said that strategies recommended by the CIO will be implemented by eGov Jamaica, the government’s ICT services agency.“He is not doing it on his own, because he has been very much engaged with others (ICT professionals) and bringing everyone to the table,” she noted, adding that the implementation of strategies will also receive oversight from the Ministry.ICT transformation initiatives are among the suite of projects with national impact, which are supported by Office of the Cabinet, which has responsibility to strengthen public sector institutions to deliver efficient and effective public goods and services. RelatedPolice Stations To Be Equipped With High-Speed Internetcenter_img RelatedGirls Learning To Code RelatedNational Indoor Sports Centre To Go Solar Government Appoints CIO to Push ICT in Public Sector TechnologyAugust 3, 2015Written by: E. Hartman Reckord Photo: Yhomo HutchinsonChairman of the Public Sector Transformation Steering Committee, Pat Francis, makes a point at a recent Jamaica House media briefing, to highlight achievements under the Public Sector Transformation and Modernisation Programme.last_img read more

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Apple reports solid Q2, ahead of new launches

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 24 JUL 2013 Steve Costello Devices Previous ArticleNFC-enabled wallet for iPhone launches in EuropeNext ArticleAT&T reports strong wireless data growth backed by LTE Author HomeDevicesNews Apple reports solid Q2, ahead of new launches Apple reported robust results for the quarter to 29 June, a period which saw no significant product launches from the iPhone maker.In a statement, Tim Cook, the company’s CEO, said: “We are laser-focused and working hard on some amazing new products that we will introduce in the fall and across 2014.”The company sold 31.2 million iPhones, a record for the June quarter, compared with 26 million in the same period last year. It said that there was a sequential decrease of around 600,000 in the channel, meaning sales to customers were slightly higher at 31.8 million.Cook played down concerns that the market for high-end smartphones has reached its peak, limiting the potential for future iPhone growth. “I don’t believe that, but we’ll see,” he said.However, the company has seen its iPhone average selling prices slide, as sales of the aging iPhone 4 made up a growing proportion of the total. This has been driven by sales of the older device in emerging markets or as a prepaid smartphone, broadening the potential market for the product line.The CEO also hit back at recent debate about its performance in Russia, where the top-tier operators have stopped sales of the iPhone. He said that “over 80 per cent of smartphones are sold in retail”, and that it has seen record iPhone activations in this market, despite the lack of presence in operator stores.Apple sold 14.6 million iPads during the quarter, compared with 17 million in the year-ago quarter. Apple noted that last year, it built 1.2 million units of iPad channel inventory in line with the launch of the third-generation iPad, whereas this year it reduced channel inventory by 700,000 units, creating a channel inventory swing of 1.9 million units.In the company’s conference call, Cook also said that the company’s performance in China was weaker in the quarter, but that focusing on revenue “doesn’t really tell the complete story”. Sell-through in this market was down 4 per cent taking into account channel inventory rebalancing, with growth in mainland China offset by weakness in Hong Kong.On a group level, it reported a profit of $6.9 billion, down from $8.82 billion year-on-year, on revenue of $35.32 billion, up slightly from $35.02 billion.Apple’s numbers are impacted by new product launches to a greater degree than its rivals, due to its focus on a limited product portfolio. This makes comparisons difficult, because of the one-off impact an introduction within a specific quarter can have – and the flatness which comes during a quiet period. Relatedcenter_img AppleFinancialiPadiPhone Tags Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more Apple faces 5G modem wait Google taps retail with NYC store KT makes LG Electronics trade-in movelast_img read more

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Schmidt steps down as Alphabet chairman

first_img Steve Costello Mobile Mix: AI, Android and open RAN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 22 DEC 2017 Previous ArticleApple admits power management slows older iPhonesNext ArticleDT strikes €1.9B deal for UPC Austria Tags Related Home Schmidt steps down as Alphabet chairman Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more center_img Google taps retail with NYC store Eric Schmidt is to stand down from his position of executive chairman at Alphabet, parent of Google, although he will remain as “technical advisor” and board member.Schmidt has spent 17 years with Google/Alphabet, including 10 as CEO. He was appointed to provide an experienced leadership hand at the fast-growing company, in support of founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin.He became executive chairman in 2011, with Page taking on the CEO role.“Since 2001, Eric has provided us with business and engineering expertise and a clear vision about the future of technology. Continuing his 17 years of service to the company, he’ll now be helping us as a technical advisor on science and technology issues,” Page said.Schmidt said: “The Alphabet structure is working well, and Google and the Other Bets are thriving. In recent years, I’ve been spending a lot more of my time on science and technology issues, and philanthropy, and I plan to expand that work.”It is anticipated the board will appoint a new executive chairman. Author Google renueva Android y muestra novedades en IA Español AlphabetEric SchmidtGooglelast_img read more

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Flathead Classic Sled Dog Race Likely Moved From Olney

first_img Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. For a sled dog race to be successful, there needs to be a desire to win in both the canine and human participants, as well as a drive to work as a team against the elements, making the sled eventually makes it home.But there’s one, single requirement more basic than any other: Snow.That final necessity has forced the organizers of the upcoming Flathead Classic Sled Dog Race, scheduled to take place March 5 and 6, to scout new locations for the event, traditionally held in Olney.“Our regular trail in Olney is not going to work,” race organizer Brett Svetlik said. “I think we’re going to look at trying to host it at the head of Whitefish Lake.”Svetlik said the recent winter warmup has left the Olney trailhead unusable for dogsleds, and the snow around Whitefish Lake still exists and has been packed down by a groomer, so trails wouldn’t have to be broken.Even with relatively warm weather expected – the National Weather Service in Missoula foresees highs in the upper 40s over the weekend, along with potential snow but more 40-degree weather early next week – Svetlik said he’s confident the race will take place with the snow already on the ground.“I think it’ll hold strong for us,” he said.The Flathead Classic is an offshoot of the valley’s previous primary race, Flathead Sled Dog Days. During the weekend, teams of one and two dogs will pull skijoring mushers for 2.2 and 4.8 miles; four-dog teams run 4.8-mile races; six-dog teams run 14.5-mile races; eight dogs pull for 25 miles; and the traditional 12-dog team runs for 35 miles.This year will also include two-dog junior league races for the young up-and-coming mushers of the sport. There’s also a Human Sledding competition planned, wherein humans step into the tethers and see what it actually takes to pull a musher.Questionable snow has hampered dogsled races in the past, but Svetlik said the conditions won’t dim many, if any, spirits of the participants.“It’s just going to be kind of spring-like, but we have a lot of mushers who want to come out,” he said.Already, around 20 teams have signed up for the race, and Svetlik said the interest from junior mushers has been strong. The community has also been involved and supportive, he said.Any sort of warm-up over the approaching weekend could have an affect on planning decisions, Svetlik said, but he remains confident.“The trailhead looks like it’ll hold for another week,” he said.For more information, visit www.flatheadclassic.org.last_img read more

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