Team managing $440 million joins LPL from Royal Alliance

first_imgThe Pittsburgh-based team, known as the Monteverde Group, began 51 years as a solo insurance practice headed by James Monteverde. Monteverde continues to lead the firm along with partners Craig Shensa, Dan Martin and Wendy Asterino. A team of eight advisers managing $440 million has switched affiliations from Royal Alliance, which is part of the Advisor Group, to LPL Financial.last_img

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ASSOCIATE PROVOST

first_imgCUT-OFF DATE FOR FILING APPLICATION:  Open UntilFilled Apply online: https://phe.tbe.taleo.net/phe03/ats/careers/v2/viewRequisition?org=NJCU&cws=44&rid=1273 As a senior leader, more specific responsibilities include:In support of Academic Affairs, this position works closelywith the university’s colleges, faculty and administrative officesto oversee, implement, manage, and revise processes related toacademic offerings and operational efficiencies for the advancementand assessment of curricular initiatives.Provides oversight and management of a variety of articulationagreements with other institutions.Provides guidance related to programs directly affectingfaculty to include shared governance initiatives and ongoingengagement with the Faculty Senate.Fosters communication and facilitates implementation andpractices across the university, including matters relating tocatalog, new course and program approval.Provides management of student grievance process, academicintegrity policy, and other student concerns. JOB SUMMARY:   Reporting to theProvost and Senior Vice President, the Associate Provost willsupport the division of Academic Affairs in the administration of aportfolio of academic programs, centers, and initiatives focused onacademic excellence and student success.  The AssociateProvost provides critical strategic senior leadership, direction,and oversight for areas including the general education program,honors program, academic and cultural centers, the first-yearorientation program, as well as the Career Office, and will work ina highly collaborative environment that respects a culture ofshared governance and cross-divisional innovation.  Thesuccessful candidate will have an understanding of trends in highereducation related to faculty and student success and willcontribute to a culture of continuous improvement throughstrategies that are data-driven and based on bestpractices.   The preferred candidate will have experiencewith program assessment and will work with academic departments andthe Office of Institutional Effectiveness to further thedevelopment and enhancement of student learning outcomes.  Inaddition, the preferred candidate will assist in planning andimplementing other strategic academic programs and will serve onuniversity service committees as needed to represent the Office ofAcademic Affairs. EXPERIENCE: Minimum of five years ofexperience in higher education managing at a senior level with aproven track record of successfully launching and managinginitiatives. New Jersey City University is a highly diverse, urban, Hispanic-and Minority-serving institution committed to transforming livesthrough education and life-long learning.  Experience teaching, advising, leading, or mentoring studentsof diverse socioeconomic, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds,differing levels of academic preparation, and varyingabilities.Experience managing budgets, making decisions, and bridgingdiverse academic needs that depend upon the allocation of criticalresources.Candidates with experience in a leadership position in a publicurban university are encouraged to apply. QUALIFICATIONS:  The successful candidate should have a demonstrated record ofpromoting high standards and evidence of successful projectmanagement in academic affairs, which includes academic policy,data-informed planning, and effective assessment.Excellent interpersonal, verbal, and written communicationskills and capacity to build strong professionalrelationships throughout the university.Experience supervising or managing professional staff. New Jersey City University is an equal opportunityinstitution encouraging a diverse pool of applicants. EDUCATION: Doctoral Degree in relevantfield. We offer a competitive Compensation and BenefitsPackagelast_img read more

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Instructor in Spanish

first_imgA background check is required for employment. Arizona StateUniversity is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an EqualOpportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicantswill be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion,national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any otherbasis protected by law.(See https://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.htmland https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/)In compliance with federal law, ASU prepares an annual report oncampus security and fire safety programs and resources.  ASU’sAnnual Security and Fire Safety Report is available onlineat https://www.asu.edu/police/PDFs/ASU-Clery-Report.pdfYou may request a hard copy of the report by contacting the ASUPolice Department at 480-965-3456. The School of International Letters and Cultures(SILC) at ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY seeks applications foran Instructor in the area of Spanish. Thesuccessful candidate will be expected to teach lower-divisioncourses in Spanish curriculum, online, in-person, and/or hybrid,hold office hours, and work closely with the program director andcoordinators to prepare class materials and assignments. Dependingon areas of expertise and need, the candidate may teachupper-division/heritage language/content courses. Must stay up todate with relevant professional development. This is a full-time,benefits-eligible appointment made on an academic year basis(Aug.16-May 15). A typical full-time course load is four classesper academic semester (for 4-credit hour classes). Subsequentannual renewal is possible contingent upon satisfactoryperformance, availability of resources, the needs of theuniversity, and sufficient enrollment in assigned courses.Anticipated start date is August 2021.The College values our cultural and intellectual diversity andcontinually strives to foster a welcoming and inclusiveenvironment. We are especially interested in applicants who canstrengthen the diversity of the academic community.Learn more about what The College of Liberal Arts and Scienceshas to offer by viewing https://thecollege.asu.edu/faculty.Arizona State University is a leading major public universitycommitted to inclusion and excellence in research andeducation.Minimum Qualifications:A. in Spanish, applied linguistics, linguistics, or relatedfield, by time of appointment.Three years’ experience in higher education teaching Spanishlanguage courses, and evidence of effective teaching (includingonline).Familiarity with second language acquisition-based pedagogicalstrategies that include proficiency-based approaches to teachingSpanish and the ACTFL proficiencyNative/near-native proficiency in both Spanish andDemonstrated commitment to equity and inclusion among diversestudentDesired Qualifications:D. in Spanish or related field by time of appointment.Demonstrated proficiency in appropriate technologies inlanguageExperience with outreach to diverse communities.Training in heritage languageAbility to teach upper-division coursework within our currentcurriculum. For related information, please see https://silc.asu.edu/degrees/spanishand https://asuonline.asu.edu/online-degree-programs/undergraduate/bachelor-arts-spanish/.Application InstructionsTo guarantee full consideration, applicants must applyelectronically to http://apply.interfolio.com/85142submitting complete dossier, which must consist of thefollowing:Cover letter outlining how the applicant’s experiences fit thequalifications listed above.Curriculum Vitae.Language teaching philosophy statement.Evidence of teaching effectiveness (quantitative and sample ofqualitative data from teaching evaluations).A statement addressing how your past and/or potentialcontributions to diversity and inclusion will advance ASU’scommitment to inclusiveContact information for 3.Applicant’s last name should appear in each uploaded file name.Cover letter can be addressed to Dr. Hope M. Anderson, SearchCommittee Chair. Questions about the position should be directed tothe search committee chair at: [email protected] Initial application deadline is April 26,2021; if not filled, applications will be reviewed everyweek thereafter until search is closed.last_img read more

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Clinical Assistant Professor (Clinician Educator) / Licensed Psychologist

first_imgThe Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the KeckSchool of Medicine of USC in Los Angeles, CA is seeking a full-timeCalifornia-Licensed Psychologist (PhD/PsyD) or in process ofobtaining license to serve as Clinical Assistant Professor ofPsychiatry and Behavioral Science (Clinician Educator). EssentialFunctions: Provide mental health services to students at StudentCounseling and Mental Health on USC’s University Park Campus. Trainand supervise practicum students, interns, and post-docs inproviding culturally appropriate client care in a short-termtherapeutic modality. Provide didactics/lectures. Job site: LosAngeles, CA. To apply, submit CV, cover letter, and 3 letters ofrecommendation to Mary Nguyen at [email protected] with “KeckUSC Psychologist” in the subject line. USC is an equal opportunityemployer that actively seeks diversity in the workplace.last_img read more

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Bus reforms pledged by Jeremy Corbyn in Labour leadership contest

first_imgJeremy Corbyn has promised to take bus networks back into public ownership if he becomes Prime Minister.Corbyn will ‘rebuild and transform Britain’s transport system’Mr Corbyn pledged to offer councils new franchising powers and allow them to set up local bus companies, and to “rebuild and transform Britain’s transport system”.He also promised to allow councils to set up municipal bus companies, and to expand bus services to areas not currently covered, giving councils franchising powers over their bus networks.Corbyn’s Labour leadership rival Owen Smith, however, said that all of these proposals were already Labour policy.The government’s Bus Services Bill will expand franchising powers; however, the bill rules out allowing local authorities to set up bus companies.Confederation of Passenger Transport CEO Simon Posner says: “The industry firmly believes that the continued success and development of bus networks relies heavily on partnership working between operators and local authorities – not in complete local authority control, which would cost the taxpayer even more money. “The partnership approach fosters flexible, locally-managed commercial bus networks, encourages innovation and ensures that services meet the changing and diverse needs of customers and local communities.“CPT continues to follow closely the passage of the Bus Services Bill through Parliament to ensure the commercial sector is able to thrive and continue to deliver for its passengers.”last_img read more

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The closing of the European mind

first_imgHope is not only the result of economic growth. Hope means confidence, and young Asians are exuding the stuff, whereas young Europeans – arrogant towards others and diffident towards themselves – too often lack ‘appetite’ and cling to the status quo. Europeans also lack long-term thinking and curiosity about ‘the Other’. As a result, they know little about the history, culture and languages of Asia. By contrast, the many Chinese and Indians graduating from Western universities feel that they understand ‘what makes us tick’. That so many Asians study in the West – and so few Westerners do so in Asia – is not a sign of the superiority of the Western mind and model. On the contrary, it impoverishes our mindset. The need to open ourselves to the Asian mind, and even to some different societal models, does not imply that we should relinquish our values. The peace, compassion and co-operation that Asians admire are the direct product of values that some of them see as ‘Western’, and that, yes, we regard as ‘universal’. Given Asia’s rise, it is illusory for Europeans to consider relations with the biggest Asian power, China, only through the prism of human rights. Moreover, Europe’s ability to exert pressure on China is extremely limited, and may be least potent where Chinese domestic matters are concerned. Nevertheless, Europeans should not be deterred by the Chinese government’s anger at the awarding of the Nobel peace prize to the Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo. In the name of Europe’s core values, all EU ambassadors to Norway should make a point of attending the Nobel award ceremony – which the imprisoned Liu cannot – despite China’s call for them to stay away. It is simply a question of self-respect. Although the EU’s image has deteriorated, Asians still find Europe’s ‘sharing of sovereignty’ model appealing in many ways. For Mahbubani, the “lessons of Europe” are crystal-clear. If emerging Asia begins to look more “like a socially and politically harmonious Europe”, the world would be a much better place. At a time when Europeans are full of self-doubt, such praise is more than welcome. Europeans, unfortunately, too often fail to see the merits of their peaceful conquest over their own worst natures. Europeans should, in the same spirit of openness, ask themselves what they can learn from Asia. The problem, of course, is that the concept of Asia is largely a Western one. Asians do not perceive themselves as Asians in the way that most Europeans view themselves as Europeans. India’s historical patrimony is very different from China’s, for example. Yet it is legitimate to ask what, for Europeans looking at Asia, would be the equivalent of the “peace, compassion and co-operation” that Asians see in Europe. Could it be a combination of hope, energy, long-term thinking, and curiosity? Dominique Moïsi is the author of “The geopolitics of emotion”. © Project Syndicate, 2010.center_img Kishore Mahbubani, a prominent Singaporean and a man often highly critical of Europe, was recently asked what Asia could learn from Europe. His reply: Europe was above all the continent of peace, compassion and co-operation. ‘Asia’ may not exist culturally, historically, religiously, socially and economically, the way that Europe does. It is a much more varied continent. But ‘Asians’ have been reflecting upon the European experiment for a long time. Enlightened Japanese elites are fascinated by Franco-German reconciliation. Could that model be applied to Japan’s relations with its former enemies, from Korea to China? And today, with the irresistible rise of a more assertive China, the example of a continent where the prospect of war between traditional enemies – or contemporary rivals – has simply disappeared is more attractive than ever. Some in China’s elite have recently discovered the Nordic social model, and Chinese delegations have been visiting regularly to see what lessons they can bring home. The reasoning is pragmatic: if the Chinese were reassured by the existence of a social-welfare state, they would probably save less and spend more, allowing the domestic market to take over from export-led growth. last_img read more

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Painful healthcare choices

first_imgSimilarly, rigorous assessment of health technologies runs into difficulties when the focus on the most effective treatments with proven benefits means excluding a drug that extends someone’s life by a few weeks at a cost of €100,000. Who is to say that is not ‘value for money’? Getting involved One idea that is missing from the Dalli vision is greater patient involvement. Involving patients in their care more effectively, from management of chronic conditions to taking medicines correctly, should also be part of the cost-efficiency treatment. According to one medical journal, almost half of all medicines are not taken properly, which at the very least represents a huge waste of resources, not to mention the risk to patients. But again, involving patients can be easier said than done. EU health systems will have to transform themselves from treating diseases and mending limbs to giving closer attention to patient compliance. None of these remedies is new and all of them are hard to put into practice. But EU policymakers are hoping that the precarious state of public finances may give fresh impetus to the attempt. From the emergency room may come a new lease of life. There are good reasons why countries spend more on health as they become wealthier, he says, adding: “Both poor and rich people want to live for longer.” And while new technology can cut costs in some areas, new drugs and devices almost always cost more, because they are often intrinsically expensive, and can also extend treatment to a wider population. Few people benefited from heart bypass surgery because it was so costly, says Pearson, but the introduction of angioplasty, which is a cheaper procedure, means new costs because it is provided for many more patients. Greater expectations People also expect more from their health providers. As Pearson puts it, “as we become richer we do not expect those mass wards, or mixed wards. We want decent food and we want a bit of service.” Allowing patients to shop around for different doctors, as is the case in France and Germany, also represents “inefficient” spare capacity in the system, which soaks up more money, Pearson says. He sees EU health systems as “riddled with overspending, underspending and misspending”. John Dalli, the European commissioner for health, who is a former finance and health minister in his native Malta, also wants governments to target waste. “We need cost-efficiency in health to ensure we can live up to our high quality, universality and solidarity values – without going bankrupt,” he said in a speech to members of the Finnish government last month. Dalli’s prescription included more spending on prevention and more rigorous assessment of the value of new technologies. However this advice – fully in line with health economists almost everywhere – is difficult to achieve in practice. EU countries spend only 2.9% of healthcare budgets on prevention, such as smoking-cessation or health education. But if the case for spending more seems obvious, these decisions are rarely taken in isolation: spending more on prevention means spending less on something else. Hospitals are popular, and shifting money away from iconic institutions to small-scale programmes with invisible beneficiaries is not easy. European-level discussions of health are increasingly common, although health services are not a competence of the European Union. The agenda for next month’s meeting of the EU’s health ministers demonstrates how many problems they share. European governments have all pledged fidelity to a philosophy of healthcare that is universal and mostly funded through public spending. But even in boom times, governments face difficult trade-offs between universal access, high-quality services and budget constraints – and in times of austerity, these tough choices become even more acute. On 3-5 April, in Gödöllo Palace, near Budapest, the ministers will reflect on some of these trade-offs. Spending on health is rising: in 2008, average spending in the EU was 8.3% of annual output, up from 7.3% a decade earlier, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Ageing populations, rising costs of medical technology, increasing public health problems such as obesity, and higher patient expectations all help push up spending. Further increases are “inevitable”, according to Mark Pearson, the head of the health division at the OECD. last_img read more

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Rutland Chamber Golf Classic results

first_imgThe Rutland Region Chamber of Commerce announces the winners of their 28th Annual Golf Classic fundraiser held recently at the Green Mountain National Golf Course in Killington. Trophies and awards were presented to the following teams: First Place Gross: Casella Waste Systems ‘Matt Albertazzi, Peter Mitendorf, Andy Mayer, Randy Dapron; First Place Net:  Brileya’s Chrysler Jeep ‘Scott Brileya, Dave Fucci, Fred Cyr, Brian Wortman; Second Place Gross: Rutland Regional Medical Center Team 1 ‘Mike Dorian, Eric Marsh, Jim Russell, Dan Cole;  Second Place Net: Rutland Regional Medical Center Team 2 ‘Dale White, Dick White, Will Gormly, Paul Laramie; Third Place Gross:  Sport Clips ‘Bob Scarcello, Lefty Lopez, Ivonne Lopez, Vic Shappy;  Third Place Net: Downtown Rutland Partnership ‘Mike Coppinger, Colin Fingon, Ejay Bishop, Tom Hart. Men’s Longest Drive:  Adam Calvin; Women’s Longest Drive:  Aimee Trombly; Perfect Drive:  Ejay Bishop; Closest to the pin 2nd shot: Dale White; Closest to the Pin: Scott Brileya; Putting Contest: Joe Rodolfy.  First Place Bank was VSECU.   BrileyasFPN:  Brileyas Chrysler Jeep team of Scott Brileya, Dave Fucci, Fred Cyr and Brian Wortman receive their trophies and prizes from Chamber Executive Vice President/CEO Tom Donahue; Jack Healy of Northeast Sports Network and the WSYB Morning Show and Chamber President Marleen Cenate CasellaFPG:  Casella Waste Management team of Matt Albertazzi, Peter Mitendorf, Andy Mayer, Randy Dapron receive their trophies and prizes from Chamber Executive Vice President/CEO Tom Donahue,; Jack Healy of Northeast Sports Network and the WSYB Morning Show and Chamber President Marlene CenateRutland Chamber 6.6.2013last_img read more

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Vermont Medical Society adopts resolutions, sets health care public policy priorities for 2014

first_imgVergennes, Vt. (Oct. 19, 2013) ‘ The Vermont Medical Society The Vermont Medical Society (VMS) today adopted policy resolutions that address a number of issues important to the state’s physicians, including improving the transition of care, supporting physician leadership, alleviating the burden of quality reporting, and setting standards for investigations conducted by the Vermont Board of Medical Practice.  VMS members approved the resolutions during the organization’s 200th annual meeting held at Basin Harbor Club in Vergennes, Vt.  ‘There are a number of opportunities and challenges facing Vermont’s health care system during this time of great transition,’ said Daniel Walsh, M.D., VMS’ newly elected president.  ‘By passing these resolutions our members seek to impact health care public policy in our state, with our priorities being improving access to quality health care as well as protecting and strengthening the patient/physician relationship.’The resolutions will form the basis of the organization’s 2014 public policy efforts on behalf of its 2,000 physician members. The adopted resolutions were: Improving Transition of Care ‘ Recognizes that the U.S. health care system often fails to meet the needs of patients transitioning from one care setting to another (i.e., hospital, home or a long-term care facility), and that care is frequently rushed, responsibility is fragmented, and there is often little communication between care settings and multiple providers.  The resolution calls for improved transition of care by resolving VMS to work the physician community and payors to educate on the use of the transition of care codes and improving care coordination, providing better incentives to ensure patients are seen in a physician’s office, rather than be at risk for readmission, and encouraging precise and meaningful discharge summaries.  Advances in Primary Care and Public Health Integration through Population Health ‘ Calls for increased integration of efforts between public health and primary care to better address the root causes of illness, prevent additional cases of disease, and to make the default choices of individuals healthy ones.  Seeks to accomplish this by committing VMS to work with numerous organizations and government agencies to implement the set of principles developed by the Institute of Medicine that they deem essential for successful integration, such as:A shared goal of population heath improvement;Community engagement in defining and addressing population health needs;Aligned leadership;Sustainability, including shared infrastructure; andSharing and collaborative use of data and analysis.Burden of Quality Reporting ‘ Seeks to address the inordinate and inefficient amount of time physicians spend dealing with multiple formularies, claims and billing procedures, credentialing requirements, prior authorization and quality reporting requirements by recommending the elimination of reporting requirements where there is a lack of evidence supporting their benefits and identifying ways to standardize the definitions and calculations for quality metrics used by the federal and state government entities, insurance payers, and others.  Electronic Medical Records and the Medical Record ‘ Encourages Vermont’s Congressional delegation to support the efforts of the Health Story Project to ensure that health information exchange standards go beyond a narrow, common data set to encompass the common types of clinical records.  The resolution also calls for Electronic Medical Records and other communication applications to respect the clinical voice and emphasize the medical record as a critical element in providing high quality care to patients.Support for Physician Policy Involvement and Physician Leadership Education ‘ Seeks to capitalize on physicians’ unique qualities that are critical for health care reform leadership to ensure that physicians have opportunities to be actively involved in forming policy in all arenas of health care reform.  Additionally, the resolution calls for the portion of hospital budgets allocated by the Green Mountain Care Board for staff engagement in health care reform initiatives be used in part to support physician leadership, with special emphasis on Vermont Medical Society Education and Research Foundation efforts to have the training and education they need to function effectively as leaders in the health care reform environment.Investigation Standards for the Vermont Board of Medical Practice ‘ Citing physician concerns that investigators from the Vermont Board of Medical Practice (VBMP) sometimes arrive unannounced at practices and request copies of patients’ records without a release or court order, and that the VBMP has no clear standards for conducting investigations that they initiate, the resolution calls for the VBMP to establish by rule procedures for investigations of alleged unprofessional conduct, as well as:Providing meaningful notice of unprofessional conduct charges to licensees and a meaningful opportunity to respond to complaints; Adopting clear and transparent standards for the use and disclosure of patients’ medical records requested in the course of an investigation of a licensee; and, Amending the physician license profile law to require the VBMP and Department of Health to remove any charges, findings or orders if the licensing authority or a court has dismissed the charges.  About the Vermont Medical Society: The Vermont Medical Society is the leading voice of physicians in the state and is dedicated to advancing the practice of medicine by advocating on behalf of Vermont’s doctors and the patients and communities they care for. The Society serves its 2,000 members through public policy advocacy on the state and federal levels, as well as by providing legal, administrative and educational support, producing a rich flow of news and information and offering member benefits that increase medical practice effectiveness and efficiency. For more information, visit www.VTMD.org(link is external). last_img read more

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Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

first_imgFive northeast Johnson County departments taking part in National Prescription Drug Take Back Day Saturday. If you have unused or expired prescription drugs that you’ve been looking to safely dispose of, you’ll have several convenient options on Saturday. Five northeast Johnson County police departments are taking part in National Prescription Drug Take Back Day. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., police from Prairie Village will be stationed outside the department at 7710 Mission Road to collect any medications people would like to drop off. During the same time, Roeland Park Police will be set up at the Roeland Park Price Chopper, 4950 Roe Ave; Fairway Police will be set up at the Fairway Hen House, 2724 W. 53rd St.; Merriam Police will be set up outside the Merriam Hen House, 5800 Antioch Rd.; and Mission Police will be set up at the Mission Farmer’s Market at 5600 Johnson Drive.Gateway plans considered next week. The Mission Gateway project is slated to be before the planning commission next week. Mayor Steve Schowengerdt is quoted by the Kansas City Star as saying the newest plan from developer Tom Valenti “on paper … doesn’t look that bad.” The latest proposal is $145 million development that still includes a Walmart. [With more diversity and density, Mission Gateway redevelopment project goes back to planners – The Kansas City Star]Roeland Park’s Ardie Davis tells history of sauce competition. Arcie and Gretchen Davis of Roeland Park helped organize a barbecue fundraiser last year to help the R Park citizens initiative. But in The Kansas City Star this week, Ardie tells how deeply his connection to barbecue runs and the history of the sauce competition that he founded and later merged with the American Royal. [How the American Royal sauce competition started as the Diddy-Wa-Diddy contest – The Kansas City Star]Hillcrest Covenant hosting regional conference on sex trafficking. Experts and advocates will be gathering at Hillcrest Covenant Church in Prairie Village today for the EMPOWERKC conference on preventing youth exploitation. The conference will focus on what both youth and adults can do to keep young people from becoming vulnerable to sex trafficking. More information available here.Sushi, Japanese grill restaurant coming to Westwood. The Star’s Joyce Smith reports that Blue Sushi Sake Grill will be coming to Westwood as a part of the Westwood Village project in late spring 2016. The Omaha-based chain has eight other Blue Sushi restaurants. [Omaha’s Blue Sushi Sake Grill opening in Westwood — Kansas City Star]The Northeast Johnson County morning roundup is brought to you by Twisted Sisters Coffee Shop on Johnson Drive. For updates on the latest blends and specialty drinks available, follow them on Facebook.last_img read more

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