Woman convicted of murder for running over her cheating husband in 2002 released from prison

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A Texas dentist who was notoriously convicted of running over her cheating husband has been released from prison after 15 years.On July 24, 2002, Clara Harris, 60, killed her husband, 44-year-old orthodontist David Harris, after she found him with his alleged mistress, Gail Bridges, authorities said.The private investigator Clara Harris hired to follow her husband videotaped the incident, which showed her striking him repeatedly with her Mercedes-Benz in the parking lot of a Houston hotel — the same one the couple had been married in on Valentine’s Day 1992.The first impact sent David Harris flying 25 feet. Then, prosecutors said Clara Harris crossed two grassy medians and ran over her husband three more times before she put the car in reverse and backed over his body, leaving the car parked on top of him.David Harris’ 16-year-old daughter — Clara Harris’ stepdaughter — was in the passenger seat of the car at the time.Prior to the attack, a confrontation between Bridges and Clara Harris occurred in the hotel lobby, and witnesses said Clara Harris tore Bridges’ shirt.David Harris had been walking Bridges to her car at time of the attack. He later died of his injuries.David Harris died hours later. The couple — who had twin boys together — had been going through a divorce at the time of his death.After she was arrested, Clara Harris told reporters that it was an accident.The day in February 2003 when Clara Harris was sentenced to 20 years in prison for murdering her husband would have been their 11th anniversary. She served 15 years of her sentence.The couple had been earning millions with their chain of orthodontist offices and lived in an estate in the Houston suburbs.“I pretty much consider my life is over,” Clara Harris told ABC News’ Diane Sawyer before her conviction.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Gun that killed 2-year-old may have been supplied by suspect in baby’s shooting

first_imgPhiladelphia Police Department(PHILADELPHIA) — The AK-47 that killed a 2-year-old girl in her Philadelphia home may have been supplied by the man who allegedly shot and critically wounded an 11-month-old boy in a separate incident hours earlier, police said.Nikolette Rivera was in her mother’s arms in her North Philadelphia home Sunday afternoon when bullets from an assault rifle ripped through her house, fatally shooting her in the head, according to Philadelphia police.A man cleaning carpets in Nikolette’s home was shot in the abdomen and hospitalized “in critical, but stable condition,” police said. Nikolette’s mother suffered a gunshot to the arm and a graze wound to the head, police.Freddie Perez, 30, was taken into custody on Tuesday on charges of murder of Nikolette and nine counts of attempted murder, police said.On Thursday, 25-year-old Tayvon Thomas was arrested on charges including the murder of Nikolette and nine counts of attempted murder, police said on Friday.“These charges stem from their criminal acts committed at both the scene of the triple shooting homicide… and the shooting incident which took place approximately eight minutes prior” at another address, Philadelphia police said at a Friday news conference.“The motive for these shootings appears to be for control of narcotics territory and its distribution in the area,” police said.On Thursday, 29-year-old Francisco Ortiz was arrested as the alleged “sole perpetrator” in the Saturday night shooting of an 11-month-old boy, Yazeem Jenkins.“We believe that Francisco Ortiz supplied the AK-47 that was used to commit the homicide” at Nikolette’s home, police said Friday.“It all revolves around drugs,” police added.The little boy was shot four times, including in the head and neck, while he was in the back of a car in the Philadelphia neighborhood of Hunting Park.A drug transaction that “went awry” is believed to have led to the shooting, police said.Three adults were in the car, including the boy’s dad. Police believe he may have been the target.Charges against Ortiz include attempted murder and aggravated assault, police said. Ortiz is also a “prime suspect” in a September domestic-related homicide, police said, but has not been charged.Meanwhile, the 11-month-old is in “really really bad condition,” police said.He has no chance for a full recovery and if he survives, he most likely will be a quadriplegic, police said Monday.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Gary Barnett gets candid about the condo boom of the 2010s and what’s to come

first_imgExtell CEO Gary Barnett (Credit: Adam Pogoff)When Gary Barnett launched sales at One57 in 2011, he was met with skepticism.Prices at the Extell Development tower ranged from $3,000 to $8,285 per square foot. Some in the industry called those asks “very rich” and questioned whether buyers would fork over such sums.But they did. In 2014, Michael Dell paid $100.47 million for the top penthouse, shattering the city’s sales record and solidifying Billionaires’ Row position as the epicenter of ultra-luxury development.Still, a condo boom during the 2010s has left few (if any) undiscovered submarkets, said Barnett, who weighed in on aspirational pricing, discounts and the fallacy of an annual pied-à-terre tax.What’s the biggest change you’ve seen in development over the past 10 years?One significant difference is we’ve never had such a [sustained] period of time where capital was so cheap. Essentially, if you had money in the bank you got 0 percent return. So we had a flood of cash into the real estate business. It was viewed as very safe. You might not make 15 percent, but you made a few percent, and that caused a tremendous surge of development.The second thing is, we’ve seen a very sharp jump in values. That’s been great, of course, for the city’s tax revenue. If you look back at the end of the last decade, prices were nowhere near what they are today on average. I’m not [just] talking about Billionaires’ Row. That was already expensive at the end of 2008. But you could get into a beautiful building in Tribeca for $2,500 per foot. What we saw in the last decade was a tremendous upsurge in cost to developers, because construction costs went up sharply.Read moreMary Ann Tighe on Manhattan’s office boom of the 2010sKent Swig on 10 years of recovering from the Great RecessionAndrew Heiberger on the future role of a resi brokerage What about super-luxury?The super-luxury also increased in supply, but that’s been absorbed. But in the mid-range at the high level — $2,500 to $4,500 per foot — there are buildings all over town with really aspirational pricing and large units. If you look across the board, that’s the weakest part of the market. People who are buying in the $5 to $10 million range, they’re not the super wealthy. They’re being very careful about what they’re getting and paying. There are a lot of buildings that might just be too expensive for what they are and people are not ready to pay that price.I’m speaking about us, as well. We have a building — the Kent [on the Upper East Side] — it’s a spectacular building. But we built a lot of units in the $6 million to $9 million range, and we see people saying, “I want to be on Park Avenue for that number.” So that building is slow. We’re offering discounts to move the product.Do you see some developers getting inventory loans?You are seeing troubled projects that haven’t sold and now need inventory loans to pay back people. There’s not much margin. The banks will be wary of giving those loans. But in a way it’s a healthy correction for the oversupply. You have cheap money, a lot of developers who want to get into the field and then an oversupply. Then the money gets nervous and you don’t see the availability anymore.Overall, New York City is booming. If there are no shocks to the system, the market will eventually recover. I think we’ve kind of hit bottom at this point in terms of pricing. But the market will eventually recover and we’ll have another upturn. This all assumes nothing dramatically changes in the overall economy or in government policies.How do you feel about your Billionaires’ Row projects?We’ve continued to see very good activity on the upper end. We don’t have the velocity we’d like to see, but we are signing deals. We are chipping away at the inventory. There’s less inventory at that super high level. There are also fewer buyers. But I don’t think it’s unhealthy. It’s still reasonably healthy — unless the government imposes new taxes will absolutely shut down the real estate industry.You’re talking about the new Transfer Taxes?Transfer taxes — it was the right thing to do. It takes money out of my pocket, plain and simple. But it didn’t dramatically move the market because it was measured. It is a one-shot tax. I’ll certainly look more carefully at the next deal, but it’s on the margins.But an annual pied-à-terre tax, all of a sudden people capitalize that. It would demolish the value of real estate. People don’t realize how bad the effects will be. This is the state making a grab and damaging the New York City tax base. Even the constant talk is damaging. It’s irresponsible to talk about something that will damage New York City so much.Real estate taxes and other revenue provides over 50 percent of the New York City budget. You want to tamper with that because some state senator wants to get a headline? And by the way, he’ll destroy the value of his constituents’ condos and co-ops.How significant are foreign buyers to the luxury market?I can’t emphasize enough, the foreign market is a very important part of our market — as it is in any large, international city. It has lessened. The Chinese were such an important force several years ago, but they’re still there. We’re seeing buyers from India picking up. We see buyers from Europe and of course the rest of the United States. There are plenty of big buyers who want to own something in Manhattan. If you drive those buyers away, you can forget about the values in the residential market.Will you be as prolific during the next decade?We are being very, very careful going forward, specifically in New York City. The market is still oversupplied. And we don’t know how [politicians] will re-write the rules of the game.The politicians say, “Look, we can do whatever we want to building owners because they can’t pick up the buildings and leave.” Well, they can put the buildings on the market and go somewhere else. We love New York, but if you make it too risky it’s going to happen.We’re definitely looking to do more outside [New York]. In New York City, we’ve moved more into the rental arena. It’s more predictable. People think there’s no limit to what you can do to try to grab from the [building] owners and developers. And there is. Here we are with the pendulum swinging and I think it’s going too far. When it does, it will have consequences.What do you think the “next” amenity or new neighborhood will be?I think there will be some trend toward micro units. I also think land prices will come down — maybe not to a point where you can build rentals. But I do think the city has to get more invested in trying to encourage affordable housing now.I don’t see any other dramatic changes, or undiscovered situations that will really come up. We’ve had an incredible boom these last several years and most of the stuff has been discovered. Hudson Yards is quite a feat. We’ve seen substantial expansion of the Billionaires’ Row area. You’ve also seen substantial development along the High Line. This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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Over 100.000 fans in Skopje together with national heroes

first_img1 Comment Over 100.000 of RK Vardar fans made an amazing winning party for their heroes in Skopje. Videos from the main square in Macedonian capital will describe the best the emotions which are made by handball success at VELUX EHF Champions League Final4.Absolutely crazy… Related Items:RK Vardar celebration 1 Comment ShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentscenter_img ShareTweetShareShareEmail Pingback: Más de 100 mil fans recibieron a sus HÉROES del RK Vardar | HARPASTUM Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Morrison reads at the Memorial Church

first_imgThe historical two-day celebration of Drew Faust’s inauguration as the president of Harvard began Thursday (Oct. 11) on a literary note. Nobel Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison read from a work-in-progress — “very, very, very much in progress,” she said.For the occasion, every pew in the high-arched space of the Memorial Church was filled, well ahead of the 4 p.m. starting time.And before Morrison even spoke, the audience was on its feet to give Faust a standing ovation. Harvard’s new president, the 28th and the first woman, stood up and waved from the front pew.“Thank you for saying, ‘Yes,’ to Harvard University,” said Memorial Church associate minister and chaplain to the University Dorothy A. Austin, who opened the ceremony. “We rise to thank you.”Morrison — all in black, and with dramatic backswept gray hair — was introduced by Natasha Trethewey, recipient of this year’s Pulitzer Prize in poetry and a one-time Radcliffe Fellow.The younger black poet wrote a poem in honor of the occasion, dedicating it to the older black Nobel laureate for “her tradition of empathy that enables our souls.”“A Letter to Miss Morrison” praised the 76-year-old novelist for “your voice, a clear bell of reckoning” and for written words that “turn the past over to light.”The past was a leitmotif during the brief event at the Memorial Church. For one, Trethewey’s Pulitzer-winning collection of poems, “Native Ground” (2006), is in part a celebration of a regiment of African-American soldiers who fought for the Union during the Civil War.In turn, Morrison is a writer whose eight novels imaginatively relive the black experience in America. And Faust is a historian of the Civil War, a bloody cauldron that marked the beginning of more than a century of fighting for racial civil rights.Then there was very recent history. Morrison opened by saying that “I actually insinuated myself into the proceedings — and the hint was received with enthusiasm.”Going to the inaugural events of women university presidents — at Smith College, Brown University, the University of Pennsylvania, and elsewhere — has been a habit over the last few years, she said. And as for Harvard and the inauguration of Faust, Morrison added, “there’s no question about the deep satisfaction of this moment.”The two women are friends. Last June, Morrison delivered a brief keynote address at the traditional Radcliffe Day luncheon. It was the unofficial occasion of Faust’s leave-taking from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, where she had been dean since 2000.It was also the day, Faust recounted to the Memorial Church audience, that she was wishing Morrison could come to the inauguration — just when her friend asked her if she could be there. So Morrison’s presence this week, said Faust, “was hardly insinuation.”Morrison stood at a podium to read, in a trademark style that is slow and precise. “Reading aloud to an audience,” she said, “is a kind of editorial process.” By the end of her reading, the Memorial Church audience was hushed and listening intently.Faust praised both the poet and the novelist for helping bring the power of history to the occasion of the inauguration.Bearing witness, and understanding the presence of history, she said, “means so much to us in all our lives and makes us human.”With that, Faust took Morrison’s arm and led her down the steps. The audience answered with more applause.last_img read more

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Cafe Gives Free Dinners so Town Can Help Family in Need

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe historic B&B Café, known as the diner where a high-profile manhunt ended with the murder of Castle Rock Marshall Ray Lewis in 1946, is making new memories that make locals feel uplifted.The Colorado eatery, normally open only for breakfast and lunch, opened its doors on Friday and Saturday night so the whole town could help an ailing toddler.The owner, Robert Schoene, allowed an employee, who is a former Mexican chef, to use the B&B those two nights so he could prepare take-out and sit-down meals for people who were then asked to donate any amount they could for the cause.Groceries were donated, according to the Castle Rick News Press, and 100 percent of the proceeds will go to help Jenimae Michener, an 11-month-old Castle Rock resident born with — Treacher Collins Syndrome.How this fundraising event came about is because Jenimae’s mom was helping out someone else.(READ the story from the Castle Rock News Press)Thanks to Glen Gibson for submitting the link on our Facebook Page!AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Pizza, Pop and Politics analyzes how the #MeToo movement relates to law and politics

first_imgRunjie Pan | The Observer Law professor Jennifer Mason McAward speaks at a Pizza, Pop and Politics lecture centered on the #MeToo Movement Tuesday. McAward lectured along with political science professor Geoff Layman.“The ultimate goal is workplace equality and an end to sexual harassment,” McAward said. “The New York Times can’t write an expose about every Harvey Weinstein that’s out there; the question is where do we go from here and how do we capitalize on the moment.”McAward said culture, the political system and the legal system all require conscious change in order to cultivate an environment of workplace equality.“How do we make the conduct not just unacceptable but unthinkable?” she said.McAward said our legal system can be used as a powerful tool to incentivize changes. She said it can help encourage better conduct and deter future harassment. “One of the key pillars of the ‘Time’s Up’ project is a fund for legal representation for sexual harassment victims,” McAward said. “People understand that the law is a crucial part of the conversation.”McAward referenced Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as a legal mechanism for accountability in sexual harassment cases. She said it states that “no employer shall discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin in employment job training and recruitment.” She said during the first year Title VII was on the books, a full third of the cases brought to court were in regard to sex discrimination.“Today about 8,000 sexual harassment claims are filed each year in the [U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission],” she said. “But that number certainly doesn’t capture the scope of the problem. I just read a study that estimates that about 70 percent of people who experience workplace discrimination don’t report it.”Layman discussed the implications of #MeToo movement for the two political parties.“I think the first thing that we should recognize is that #MeToo is not occurring in a political vacuum; it’s occurring in a political moment when there is a lot of activism by citizens, particularly by women, that is fueled in part by the frustration over Hillary Clinton, the first major nominee who was a woman, and by [President] Donald Trump’s win and perhaps by the lack of consequences for the charges of sexual misconduct by Trump himself,” he said.Layman said though he thinks the broad cultural shift the movement has caused is more important than its political implications, it is still important to consider its potential effects on politics. He said Trump has spurred a political awakening in women that has charged their higher levels of political engagement and activism.“We saw women’s voting and turnout patterns were particularly important in the recent statewide elections in Virginia, the gubernatorial elections which the Democrat won and certainly in Alabama where really there was a very impressive turnout of African American women which was a big reason for Roy Moore’s defeat and Doug Jones’s win,” he said.Layman said surveys have shown that women are more likely than men to say they have been more engaged in politics after the 2016 election. This trend is especially prevalent in women with postgraduate degrees. He said a record number of women are also running for office, with 79 women considering running for governor in 2018 and four times as many Democratic women running for House of Representative seats compared to Republican women.“I think it’s important to put this #MeToo movement for its partisan implications in context,” Layman said. “It’s part of this broader movement where women seem to have reacted to the Trump presidency by becoming more interested, more engaged and more active especially on the left side of politics, the liberal side of politics.”Though the Democratic Party has more strongly identified with the #MeToo movement, Layman said this does not necessarily mean the movement is completely positive for the party and that it could be a double-edged sword.“This is sort of another issue that appeals to a specific constituency and maybe is not as important to others,” he said. “The white working class would not seem to be as concerned about sexual harassment, about #MeToo, [and] is more concerned about economic conditions. … Another potential con is it’s more identity politics … trying to piece together a coalition by appealing to small minority groups based on their narrow issues and what it needs to do is again be the party for all Americans.”Layman said the #MeToo movement has spurred a counter–mobilization among men. This is especially true of conservative men who see Trump as their leader and following his lead in claiming that allegations of sexual assault ignore due process for the accused. He said though it is hard to outline the #MeToo movement’s partisan implications, it is still important to put them in context.“It could be really good, it could be neutral, it could possibly be even bad,” he said. “The more attention there is to sexual misconduct and the more famous and powerful men that are brought down because of their sexual misconduct that just seems to put more attention onto President Trump’s problems with charges of sexual harassment and misconduct.”Tags: #MeToo, Pizza Pop and Politics, Sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, women A simple hashtag, #MeToo, was the spark that helped light a contemporary social movement, and on Monday members of the Notre Dame community came together in Geddes Hall to discuss the legal and political implications of the #MeToo moment.The lecture and discussion was part of the NDVotes lecture series “Pizza, Pop & Politics.” Jennifer Mason McAward, associate professor of law and director of the Center for Civil and Human Rights, and Geoff Layman, professor of political science and interim director of the Rooney Center for the Study of American Democracy, led the discussion.last_img read more

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Other Military Units and Schools

first_img14th Combat Support HospitalThe 14th Combat Support Hospital is a major subordinate command with tactical higher headquarters, the 44th Medical Brigade and the 3rd Infantry Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and Fort Stewart, Georgia. The 14th CSH provides Level III Health Service Support and Force Health Protection to forces conducting unified land operations and contingency operations in joint/combined operational areas.The 14th CSH is the higher headquarters for the 926th Medical Detachment (Preventive Medicine), the 463rd Medical Detachment (Veterinary Services), the 690th Medical Company (Ground Ambulance) and the 19th Medical Team (Optometry Services).The 690th Medical Company (Ground Ambulance) provides area ground evacuation and emergency medical treatment in support of any contingent mission, as well as in support of all Defense CBRN Reaction Force (DCRF) operations in response to a deliberate or inadvertent CBRN incident.The 926th Medical Detachment (Preventive Medicine) protects and promotes the fighting strength by delivering Corps-level technical consultation and preventive medicine services, supporting worldwide, unified land operations, including contingency, homeland defense, peacekeeping, humanitarian and civil assistance missions.The 463rd Medical Detachment (Veterinary Services) is one of only eight Army veterinary detachments in the U.S., Europe and Asia. It has a dual mission of providing animal medicine, primarily to military working dogs, and food and safety inspection support. Today’s veterinary service Soldiers gain skills in animal science and food science, and many conduct commercial audits of food-processing plants.The 19th Medical Team (Optometry Services) provides full optometry and optical fabrication services, as well as high-quality acute and routine optometric care to all war-fighters in support of training, combat and humanitarian operations.75th Ranger RegimentThe 75th Ranger Regiment conducts special operations missions in support of U.S. policy and objectives. The regiment is one of the very few 100 percent volunteer units in the military. Every Soldier must be selected for assignment to the regiment.The regiment is composed of one special troops battalion and three organizationally identical, rapidly deployable light Infantry special operations battalions with specialized skills that enable them to perform a variety of special operations missions. These missions include, but are not limited to, airborne, air assault and direct action operations, raids, and infiltration and exfiltration by air, land or sea, in addition to airfield seizure, recovery of personnel and special equipment, and support of general purpose forces. Each of the regiment’s three line battalions rotates as the “Ranger Ready Force.” This battalion is at a constant readiness to deploy and is expected to be able to respond anywhere in the world within 18 hours.Fort Benning is home to Regimental Headquarters, Headquarters staff, the 3rd Ranger Battalion and the Regimental Special Troops Battalion. The 1st Ranger Battalion at Hunter Army Air Field, Georgia, and the 2nd Battalion stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington, are also part of the regiment.ARNG Warrior Training CenterThe Army National Guard Warrior Training Center is at Camp Butler in the Harmony Church area of Fort Benning. The WTC trains Soldiers and DOD and foreign service members in functional skills, which include Ranger Training Assessment, Modern Army Combatives, Air Assault, Pathfinder, Bradley and Abrams Training Assessment, and Vehicle Crew Evaluator courses.A Company conducts the Ranger Training Assessment Course and Combatives Level I and II courses. RTAC prepares Soldiers to succeed at the U.S. Army Ranger Course by training them on troop leading procedures, combat orders and reconnaissance/combat patrols to the same standards as the Ranger Course.B Company conducts Air Assault and Pathfinder courses. The Air Assault Course teaches Soldiers the various types of missions performed by rotary wing aircraft, aircraft safety, aero-medical evacuation procedures, pathfinder operations, principles and techniques of combat assaults, rappelling techniques and sling-load operations. The Pathfinder Course provides unit commanders with Soldiers who possess technical expertise in air movement, air assault, airborne and air resupply operations for rotary or fixed wing aircraft.C Company conducts multiple courses with respect to the Bradley Fighting Vehicle platform and the Heavy Brigade Combat Team, including the Bradley Training Assessment Course and Vehicle Crew Evaluator. C Company also trains Soldiers on maneuver and small arms simulators.D Company teaches multiple courses supporting employment of the M1 Abrams Tank platform, including the Abrams Training Assessment Course, Senior Gunner Course and HBCT Vehicle Crew Evaluator courses. D Company also provides Soldiers with New Equipment Training on Abrams tank gunnery simulations systems.Army Marksmanship UnitThe U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit enhances the Army’s recruiting effort, raises the standard of the Army’s marksmanship proficiency and supports the Army’s small arms research and development initiatives. Since 1956, members of the USAMU have won hundreds of national titles, more than 106 World Cup medals, 835 World Championship medals and 24 Olympic medals.The unit promotes the Army by heightening public trust and confidence in Army marksmanship through awareness programs, which assist the U.S. Army Recruiting Command’s increasing requirement for top quality recruits. The USAMU also enhances combat readiness through the unit’s provision of technical and advisory assistance in the development of military match-type small arms, equipment and ammunition. Upon request, USAMU will conduct basic rifle and pistol marksmanship “train-the-trainer” clinics for small arms proponents, the U.S. Army Infantry School and other service marksmanship training units.USAMU is composed of seven competitive shooting sections: Service Rifle, Service Pistol, International Rifle, International Pistol, Action Shooting, Shotgun and Paralympic. Of these teams, International Rifle, International Pistol, Shotgun and Paralympic are Olympic sports. Support is provided to these Soldier-athletes through the Custom Firearms Shop and the support branches of supply, operations and administration. Additionally, the USAMU has an Instructor Training Group that translates the lessons learned from competition to combat application through Close-Quarters Marksmanship and Squad Designated Marksmanship courses. The Instructor Training Group also enhances the combat readiness of operational forces by conducting more than 40 training missions annually.The unit makes or customizes small arms and ammunition through the Custom Firearms Shop, with gunsmiths, machinists, range technicians and ammunition loaders. Here, gunsmiths build top-quality, competitive-grade rifles and pistols. The shop’s research and development efforts have led to enhanced accuracy and reliability of our competitive weapons systems and ammunition and improved the combat effectiveness of the entire Army. It is here that the M-21 and M-24 sniper systems and Special Reaction Team rifles were developed and tested.902 Military Intelligence GroupThe Fort Benning Field Office, 902d Military Intelligence Group, conducts full spectrum Counterintelligence operations for the Army enterprise to protect forces, information and technologies by detecting, identifying, neutralizing, and exploiting Foreign Intelligence Services, international terrorist threats and insider threats to U.S. Military forces at Fort Benning, throughout Georgia and the Panhandle of Florida. The 902 is in Building 108 on Gillespie Street. For more information, call 706-545-2828.WHINSECThe Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation was created by public law as a DOD education facility, opening its doors in 2001. It provides professional education and training to eligible persons of the nations of the Western Hemisphere, within the context of the democratic principles set forth in the Charter of the Organization of American States. The institute is subordinate to the Combined Arms Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.Missions include: educating current and future leaders; fostering mutual knowledge, transparency, confidence and cooperation; and promoting democratic values, respect for human rights, and an understanding of U.S. customs and traditions.Courses include a Command & General Staff Officer Course and a Maneuver Captains Career Course, both of which meet the essential qualifications for their U.S. officer students in their military education levels. Fourteen other courses are also provided in residence, including four-week Cadet Leadership Development courses. Summer iterations of the cadet courses include U.S. military cadets from ROTC, USMA and potentially other service academies as well.Faculty and staff are members of all branches of the armed services of the United States and other countries, other U.S. government agencies, civilian professors and visiting guest speakers and lecturers. This multiservice, multi-agency and multinational team has trained more than 16,000 students in the past 12 years. Students are military, law enforcement and government civilians from nations of the Organization of American States, including the U.S., Canada and countries from the Caribbean.To learn more about the institute, go to www.benning.army.mil/tenant/whinsec. WHINSEC also has a Facebook page. The institute is located on Baltzell Avenue.last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: Julie’s Greenroom Gets Starry Soundtrack & More

first_imgJulie Andrews & Giullian Yao Gioiello on ‘Julie’s Greenroom'(Photo: Ali Goldstein/Netflix) Julie Andrews & More Featured on Julie’s Greenroom AlbumBroadway stars can be heard on the soundtrack to Netflix’s all-new arts educational show Julie’s Greenroom. The album will feature songs performed by stage and screen legend Julie Andrews as well as guest stars like Alec Baldwin, Carol Burnett, Tituss Burgess and Hello, Dolly! star David Hyde Pierce. The Julie’s Greenroom soundtrack will be released by Varèse Sarabande digitally on April 14 and on CD on May 5.Kenita Miller, Kevin Massey Set for “Western Musical Adventure” Bella: An American Tall TaleComplete casting has been announced for the world premiere musical Bella: An American Tall Tale by Kirsten Childs. Described as a Western musical adventure, Robert O’Hara directs the new work with choreography by Camille A. Brown. Previews begin at Playwrights Horizons on May 19 with an opening set for June 12. The production will run through July 2. The cast will feature Marinda Anderson, Yurel Echezarreta, Brandon Gill, Olli Haaskivi, Ashley D. Kelley, Kevin Massey, Jo’Nathan Michael, Kenita R. Miller, Paolo Montalban, Gabrielle Reyes, Britton Smith and NaTasha Yvette Williams. Playwrights Horizons debuted Childs’ 2000 musical The Bubbly Black Girl Sheds Her Chameleon Skin, which will receive a revival from Encores! Off-Center this summer.Martha Plimpton to Join Stars of Come From Away & Bronx Tale for Benefit ConcertSNL’s Cecily Strong will host the star-packed karaoke event Broadway Acts for Women, a benefit for reproductive rights advocacy organization “A Is For.” Tony nominee Martha Plimpton will be joined by Come From Away star Jenn Colella, A Bronx Tale leading lady Ariana DeBose and Hamilton’s Brian d’Arcy James. Also on the lineup are Plimpton’s dad, Keith Carradine, Noah Galvin and Rebecca Luker. The event will take place May 7 at 6:15pm at Feinstein’s 54 Below. “A Is For” says the event will be a fast-paced, outrageous night of dinner and music you won’t want to miss. With all these stars, you bet we’ll be there.Matilda Songwriter Tim Minchin to Create Children’s Book Based on Song “When I Grow Up”Matilda songwriter Tim Minchin, back on Broadway with a new score for Groundhog Day, is creating a “When I Grow Up” picture book based on the moving tune from his Broadway debut musical. Scholastic will publish the book that will feature illustrations by Steve Antony. The book will imagine life from a child’s viewpoint, with the humor and poignancy of the song from which it gets its title — very much like Matilda, which mesmerized busloads of kids for almost four years on Broadway. “I feel incredibly lucky to be able to lend my lyrics to a children’s book,” says Minchin in his blog. “I can’t wait to hold a copy in my hands.” Neither can we.Hamilton’s America Documentary Is Peabody Award FinalistThe PBS documentary Hamilton’s America has been honored as a finalist for the Peabody Award. The film that covers the history and creative process behind Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Broadway hit Hamilton aired on Great Performances as part of the 2016 PBS Arts Fall Festival. The behind-the-scenes look at Miranda’s musical can be viewed for free online via PBS. View Commentslast_img read more

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Contract appellate lawyers to reduce the high case loads?

first_img March 1, 2010 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Regular News Contract appellate lawyers to reduce the high case loads? Contract appellate lawyers to reduce the high case loads? Senior Editor David Monaco removed his “judge hat” as chief judge of the Fifth District Court of Appeal and chair of the District Court of Appeal Budget Commission.“This is just Dave speaking now,” he told members of the Senate Criminal and Civil Justice Appropriations Committee.“And Dave says, ‘Look, if we have a surplus, maybe for a year we ought to share some of that with the public defender, with the state attorney, and with the Attorney General’s Office, and limit it to retention of attorneys in the trial and appellate bench. And limit it to contracting with attorneys for one year. There are a lot of unemployed attorneys out there who would love to have a one-year contract with these organizations.”Helping those agencies hire attorneys to work on criminal appeals would help move about 60 to 65 percent of the appellate courts’ case loads, he said.“That’s just me. I don’t have authority to speak to that. That has to come from the Supreme Court, and certainly not from one judge among 61 others. But I think that’s something that ought to be considered, at least in the short term.”Sen. Victor Crist, R-Tampa, committee chair, cracked: “The lobbyist for the state attorneys is on his way out. . . to announce that.”Judge Monaco laughed and said: “I think that would be wonderful. The fact is, if we are going to use that money for anything, it ought to be used for the court family. And this may be the only opportunity we ever have to do that. From our personal, selfish perspective, it would be much better to hold those dollars in that trust fund until the next five years when it’s used up. Because in a couple of years, we will have to fill that gap. The current funding from that trust fund is simply not going to be adequate a couple of years from now when foreclosures drop.“But we are in a crisis situation now. And if it is possible to share a little bit of that, then why not? Why not?”Putting his judge hat back on, Monaco shared other recommendations for using the court trust fund created last year by the Legislature to provide a more stable funding source for the courts by redirecting millions of dollars in filing fees and fines. So far, the trust fund is performing so well that the Article V Revenue Estimating Conference in November revised its forecast for revenues for 2010-2011 from $214 million to $368 million, according to the Office of the State Courts Administrator.Monaco said the appellate courts need to get transcripts of cases faster to clear up the backlog, but trial judges bemoan they don’t have any money to hire more court reporters.“It seems to me one of the things we ought to be able to do in using that surplus is to focus it on court reporters, on a contract basis, for one year,” Monaco said.To work cheaper and better, Monaco said his fellow appellate judges are anxious for finalization of the Internet e-filing portal, along with a compatible case management system.“One of our judges wrote, ‘You know, we’re really not that far away from quill pens and ink wells.’ We are still using a lot of paper. It takes huge amounts of time. And it’s slowing down the through-put of our cases.“In that same vein, I don’t know why we don’t use electronic payment for filing fees. The First District just started doing it. It seems to me to be such a no-brainer.”Another idea is embrace video oral arguments, Monaco said, as is used by the Third District Court of Appeal, for the convenience and travel savings to clients, lawyers, and agency and court system personnel.last_img read more

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