UKIE: Only 19% of parents set and enforce screen time limits for their children

first_imgUKIE: Only 19% of parents set and enforce screen time limits for their childrenDigital School House report finds just 44 per cent of parents talk to their children about online safety Haydn TaylorSenior Staff WriterFriday 14th September 2018Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleUKIELess than a quarter of parents set and actually enforce limits for the amount of time their children spend online, a report from UKIE’s Digital School House has revealed. ‘Online Safety: A Pupil’s Perspective’ surveyed over 2,000 students in primary and secondary schools across the UK; the report found that while children have good understanding of online safety, parents frequently don’t, and do little to set boundaries for the amount of time their children spend online. As video games continue to attract criticism from the mainstream media over issues like ‘gaming disorder’ or Fortnite-mania, one statistic in particular showed a disregard from parents over setting screen time for children. Only 19 per cent of students surveyed said that their parents set, and actually enforce restrictions around the amount of time they spend online. Adding to that, nearly 30 per cent said that limits are set, but not enforced, while 35 per cent reported that no limits are set whatsoever. “Regardless of actual parental practice what’s important here is the student’s perception,” the report reads. “If they don’t perceive their to be limits placed upon their time spent, then they are unlikely to follow this in practice.”This issue is underlined by the fact that only 44 per cent of students’ parents talk to them about online safety. In terms of a parents’ active involvement, just 32 per cent of students say their parents help them with privacy settings when playing games, compared to 45 per cent don’t. While parents are more involved if their children play games online, with 46 per cent of parents setting parental controls if their child plays online compared to 37 per cent of their child doesn’t, it still demonstrates a low level of parental oversight. It is perhaps fortunate then that 77 per cent of students know where to find information on how to play games online safely and responsibly. Furthermore, the report found that children — especially those who play online games — have a high level of digital literacy, and understand the importance of privacy and online safety. Of those surveyed, 78 per cent of respondents who play online games understood the importance of privacy settings, compared to 72 per cent of those who didn’t. That said, there was a clear disparity between those who knew about online safety and those who actually applied their knowledge. The report found that while 85 per cent of boys know how to update their privacy settings on games consoles — compared to 44 per cent of girls — only 71 per cent of boys, and 40 per cent of girls, actually updated their settings accordingly. “There is great potential here for the video game industry to continue to innovate as well as improve upon the visibility and awareness of existing resources and safety controls,” the report reads. Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games “Ask About Games, PEGI age ratings, and parental controls commonly found in games and on consoles collectively help to inform and provide a safe environment for children of all ages to engage with video games. However, much more can be done to bring this to the attention of the wider public….”Our ambition is to take these findings into consideration and use them to develop a set of recommendations that enable industry and education to collaboratively improve the provision of e-safety education both in schools and at home.”The full report can be found here, and includes a number of other insights around children and online safety.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesPandemic drives UK games market to record £7bn yearSpending on video games products and culture rose 30%, topping 2018 record by more than £1 billionBy James Batchelor A month agoGovernment funding helps UK games firms create hundreds of job placementsUKIE and Into Games working with 45 companies to get young people back into work during pandemicBy James Batchelor 2 months agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

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EdF and Enel close set to agreeing access deal

first_imgNuclearReactors EdF and Enel close set to agreeing access deal RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The French group is looking to Enel to bear some of the cost of its new EPR reactor project. The arrangement may result in Enel acquiring shares held by EdF in SNET, the electricity production subsidiary of French industrial group Charbonnages de France. 1.8.2004 8 January 2004 – Reports in the French press suggest that Electricité de France (EdF) is set to sign an agreement with Italian power utility Enel which would settle disputes between the two countries over power market access. TAGSEDFEnel Linkedin Enel is negotiating the right to buy and sell electricity on the French market. The Italian group hopes to access 7500 MW of electricity from EdF’s power stations for this purpose, while EDF is talking in terms of 5000 MW. By chloecox – No posts to display EDF hopes that a deal with pave the way for the lifting of the freeze on its voting rights in Italian energy company Edison, fixed at 2 per cent by ministerial decree. However, according to Enel, the Italian authorities would need a signal from the French government that it will change the statutes of EdF before they would be willing to take action. Facebook Twitter Linkedin Framatome handling refueling, O&M services for Dominion nuclear fleet through 2026 Facebook Scottish nuclear power plant back online after maintenance outage AP: Chernobyl, 35 years after worst nuclear power accident Previous articleFlowserve’s Power Generation group recognized by Constellation EnergyNext articlePower costs threaten Alcan Brazil plans chloecox Twitterlast_img read more

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Fiance of slain DC jogger Wendy Martinez plans to run Boston Marathon in her honor

first_imgMetropolitan Police Department(WASHINGTON) — Newly engaged, with a list of goals that could fill five lifetimes, 35-year-old Wendy Martinez, an ambitious Washington, D.C., woman, was on her after-work run when it all came to an end.Six months later, Martinez’s fiancé is coping with the shock of the loss as he vows to fulfill a major goal she couldn’t reach: running the Boston Marathon.A brutal attackMartinez was running in D.C.’s bustling Logan Circle neighborhood on Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018, when she was stabbed seven times in the face, neck and back, in an unprovoked attack by a stranger, according to court documents.Surveillance video showed Martinez alerting others around her about the danger, authorities said.Officials said she stumbled into a restaurant after the attack where customers tried, unsuccessfully, to save her life.“She did nothing to deserve this,” her mother, Cora Martinez, told ABC News Friday, overcome with emotion. “Her faith, her passion for people and her determination to reach her goals … She was full of life, full of dreams. A person that really wanted to enjoy life even more. And she couldn’t.”Suspect Anthony Crawford was arrested two days later and charged with first-degree murder while armed, according to police.‘Living the happiest moment in life’Wendy Martinez moved to the United States from Nicaragua when she was 5 and was raised in Florida.A determined young woman with a “passion for people,” according to her mom, she was working as chief of staff at tech startup FiscalNote. But she also “kept looking for better ways to reach out to women,” said Cora Martinez. “My daughter was a great motivator.”A world traveler, she wanted to help Latina immigrants in the U.S., her mother said, and “had a dream about helping people from Nicaragua, women with low income, so they’d be educated and financially ready to become independent.”“She also developed this passion for running. She found in running a great way to find herself,” Cora Martinez said. “Not only to relieve her body from stress but to relieve her mind of any negative thoughts. So she would go run and she would dream while running. ‘What is next? What am I supposed to do in life? Who am I supposed to be helping?’”Running brought Wendy Martinez to her future fiancé, Daniel Hincapie, as he trained for his first half marathon a few years ago. A mutual friend suggested Wendy give him some tips, Hincapie told ABC News.They became a couple, and in September 2018, days before Wendy Martinez was killed, Hincapie popped the question.He decided to propose at her favorite spot in D.C. — the Spanish Steps.“To actually tell her that I loved her and I wanted to spend the rest of my days with her in that place had a lot of meaning,” he said. “It was a moment of joy… we were very much in love.”“She was living the happiest moment in life,” Cora Martinez said. “She was excited about what was coming.”Three days before the attack, the mother and daughter picked out a wedding dress.The 35-year-old would be buried in that dress.‘It’s almost like running with her’Crawford, Martinez’s suspected killer, underwent psychiatric treatment and medication for psychosis, and this month he was ruled competent to stand trial, reported ABC Washington, D.C., affiliate WJLA.Crawford is due to return to court on May 17. His defense attorney did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.Hincapie called the shocking crime “one of those things I think that no one is prepared to face.”“And when you actually realize how random the whole thing was, it’s very difficult to grasp, because I think at the end of the day, we’re humans and we try to rationalize violence,” he said.Amid the grief, Hincapie said “the worst thing you can do is fall into hate,” so he instead chose to celebrate his fiancée’s life.“One of her dreams was actually to run the Boston Marathon,” Hincapie said — a race he’ll run in her honor next month.“Having the opportunity to fulfill her dream after what happened, it’s extremely symbolic,” Hincapie said. “She was running when she was attacked, so it’s also a way to tell the world [we will] finish her race.”“It’s a way to cope,” he said. “It’s also a way to connect with her. … It’s almost like running with her.”Beyond the marathon, Hincapie said he wants to inspire other young women to embrace a full life the way his fiancée did.“I want to young women to continue believing that it’s possible to be kind, to give back to the community, to pursue love and to be successful. Wendy represented all those aspects I think,” he said. “If you can be any person in the world, be someone like Wendy.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Hudson Yards has an exclusive new restaurant, David Werner buys downtown: Daily digest

first_imgEvery day, The Real Deal rounds up New York’s biggest real estate news, from breaking news and scoops to announcements and deals. We update this page at 9 a.m., 12:30 p.m., and 4 p.m. ET. Please send any tips or deals to [email protected] page was last updated at 4 p.m. It’s bad news for Macy’s as the retailer’s earnings guidance was cut. As malls struggled across the country, Macy’s management insisted it was above the fray. But after the company’s earnings guidance was lowered Wednesday, following poor quarterly earnings, it appears the retailer is yet another victim to changing consumer behavior. [Yahoo] Real estate investor David Werner buys downtown rental building at discount. Prolific investor David Werner has reportedly purchased the leasehold for 2 Cooper Square with a group of unnamed partners for more than $85 million — $50 million less than Wafra paid for the leasehold in 2012. [Crain’s] Who is REBNY donating to in Albany? An analysis by City & State shows the Real Estate Board of New York donated thousands of dollars to Democratic state senators in 2019, a shift away from Senate Republicans, who were considered largely aligned with the real estate industry. [City & State] Want to go to Hudson Yards’ newest restaurant? Only if you’re a friend of Stephen Ross. A new restaurant set to open in Hudson Yards this fall will be a members-only destination reportedly created for developer Stephen Ross’s “super-rich buddies and CEO friends.” [Eater] Brokers say the $20 rental application fee cap doesn’t apply to them. REBNY is advising its member brokers that a $20 limit on rental application fees, handed down as part of the new rent laws, does not apply to them because they are intermediaries, rather than landlords. [The City] Developers of a Hudson Valley project say local leaders want to keep Hasidic Jews out. Tension is brewing in Chester, New York, where developers have accused local leaders of blocking a 431-unit housing project to keep out Hasidic Jews. The developer says the town has delayed the project, and is seeking $100 million in damages. [NYT] Morgan Stanley lost the lead in WeWork’s IPO financing. The co-working giant rejected has Morgan Stanley’s pitch to be the top underwriter on its impending IPO, so the financial giant pulled back from the deal entirely. [Bloomberg] Margaret Chin (Credit: Facebook)Councilmember Margaret Chin says hostels will kill Airbnb. The legislation to regulate affordable, communal accommodations was floated earlier this week, and Chin says it will pose a significant challenge to the Airbnb market. [Crain’s] An accuser of Jeffrey Epstein has sued his estate. A woman who claims Epstein sexually abused her when she was a teenager filed a civil lawsuit against his estate Wednesday — the first of many anticipated lawsuits in the wake of the financier’s death. [NYT] WeWork CEO Adam Neumann (Credit: iStock)WeWork’s IPO filing laid the company bare. CEO Adam Neumann has borrowed almost $1 billion from WeWork and its lenders. This was one of many disclosures in WeWork’s IPO filing Wednesday. We broke down the rest. [TRD] Clockwise from left to right: 50 Hudson Yards, Farley Post Office redevelopment, 1 Madison Avenue, and Apple CEO Tim Cook (Credit: Hudson Yards, Skanska, Google Maps, and Getty Images)Apple is on the hunt for massive office space in Manhattan. The company has reportedly looked at 50 Hudson Yards, the Farley Post Office redevelopment and One Madison Avenue. It’s joining tech giants Facebook and Amazon in the race to find prime office space in the city. [TRD] David Marx is building on a Queens site he bought from his own company. MDG Real Estate’s Marx has filed plans for what would be the borough’s tallest building outside of Long Island City, just weeks after announcing the sale of a Queens development site to… himself. [TRD] Brooklyn rents hit a record high in July. Douglas Elliman’s monthly report on the city’s rental market reveals that Brooklyn’s median rent went up by 1.7 percent to hit $3,000 in July — a new record for the borough. [TRD] Compiled by Sylvia Varnham O’Regan FROM THE CITY’S RECORDS: Permit filings:Exact Capital pre-filed an application for a 12-story residential building at 304 West 150th Street in Central Harlem. The property will measure about 31,000 square feet and have 31 apartments. [DOB] Residential sales:Hedge funder Johannes William Weber bought a penthouse at 12 East 88th Street on the Upper West Side for $10.325 million. [ACRIS] Financings:Savanna secured a $50.92 million mortgage for 24-25 West 25th Street in Flatiron from Mesa West Core Lending Fund. [ACRIS] Compiled by Mary Diduch This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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Alice Walton, real estate execs pour cash into Bronx races

first_img Full Name* Email Address* John Sanchez and Eric Dinowitz (Twitter, iStock/Illustration by Alexis Manrodt for The Real Deal)Real estate-related PACs and the world’s wealthiest woman are spending big on local New York City elections.New Yorkers for a Balanced Albany, backed by charter school advocate and world’s ninth richest person Alice Walton, the Wal-Mart heiress, has spent more than $75,000 on mailers, internet ads and live phone calls in support of candidate John Sanchez, who is running for the Bronx City Council seat vacated by Rep. Ritchie Torres, The City first reported.Another group, Voters of NYC, is backing Sanchez as well as Eric Dinowitz, who’s running for City Council in Riverdale. Voters of NYC’s contributions include $185,000 from real estate firms, notably $100,000 from developer William Lie Zeckendorf’s WLZ Properties.ADVERTISEMENTRead moreWhat real estate gets in Biden’s $1.9 trillion packageNo parking? No problem for Monadnock project in GowanusLandlords hail relief bill as end of “cancel rent” Voters of NYC was registered with the state Board of Elections by consultant Jeffrey Leb, who also registered Common Sense NYC. That organization spent more than $200,000 to influence a Queens special election this winter and has raised nearly $1.5 million in total, including $1 million from Related Companies Chairman Stephen Ross.But some are confused about the choice of these real estate interests, including the candidates themselves.“The real estate interests behind this mailer obviously don’t know me very well. I don’t want or need the support of anyone who doesn’t share my values — and that means anyone in real estate,” Dinowitz told The City, describing himself as favoring tenants and opposed to “overdevelopment.”Sanchez has sent mailers proclaiming “Housing is a human right,” but unlike some activists who echo that slogan, he supports adding supply to improve housing affordability and access. Sanchez is endorsed by the yes-in-my-backyard group Open New York.Related’s Ross is also rounding up perhaps tens of millions of dollars to influence the mayoral race.[The CITY] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Message*last_img read more

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Russia moves closer to criminalizing criticism of national anthem

first_imgThe pro-Kremlin members of parliament behind the bill say they were inspired to take action after satirical verses appeared on a giant television screen while the anthem was being sung at a government meeting in Russia-annexed Crimea. The subtitles, taken from one of many online parodies, described Russia as “insane,” “slavish,” and “boastful.”Vadim Tyulpanov, chairman of the parliamentary procedures committee in the upper house of parliament and one of the bill’s authors, said Tuesday that the Supreme Court’s feedback would be incorporated into a draft being prepared for a first reading in parliament.In an explanatory note, the bill’s authors say the abuse of the state symbols of Russia, including the anthem, represent an insult to the entire nation. Also On POLITICO Vladimir Putin: Russia and EU are at a ‘crossroads’ By Zoya Sheftalovich Russia’s Supreme Court has given its approval to a bill criminalizing satirical takes on the country’s national anthem.Under the proposed law, anyone “intentionally distorting the words or music of the anthem in public performance, social media, and on the internet” could be sentenced to a year in prison, the BBC reported.Insulting the anthem is currently a civil offense attracting a fine of between $45 and $2,200, while insulting the state flag and coat of arms is already a crime, the BBC reported, citing the Gazeta.ru website.last_img read more

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D.C. Paramedics Hospitalized After EMS Call

first_imgWASHINGTON (NBC Washington) – Two paramedics and a patient have been hospitalized after inhaling a large amount of pesticide at an Anacostia apartment complex. Paramedics with D.C. Fire and EMS had initially responded to an apartment in the 2300 block of Good Hope Road Wednesday evening for a call of residents feeling unwell. During the response, two of the paramedics themselves began feeling lightheaded. A HAZMAT crew responded, and found a large amount of pest control chemicals in the building. The two paramedics, along with the patient they had been treating, have been transported to a local hospital. No word on their conditions.last_img read more

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Michigan State gameday smoother than last

first_imgBy SARA FELSENSTEIN Associate News Editor Director for Game Day Operations Mike Seamon said he “couldn’t be happier” with the way the past home game weekend turned out. Seamon, also the associate vice president of Campus Safety, said over 82,000 people attended the sold out Michigan State game Saturday. Seamon called the second game day of the season a stark improvement from the afternoon of the USF game, when severe weather resulted in the first stadium evacuation in Notre Dame history. “Compared to the first week, talk about total opposites,” he said. “It was good to get back to a regular game and not have to be worrying about weather. It went extremely well.” Police made seven arrests Saturday, director of Notre Dame Security Police Phil Johnson said. He said one man was arrested for public intoxication inside the stadium. Outside the stadium, four people were arrested for public intoxication, one for disorderly conduct and false informing and one was ticketed for underage drinking, Johnson said. Campus was packed the entire weekend, Seamon said, with 15,000 people attending the pep rally on Irish Green Friday and over 3,000 visiting the tunnel. Seamon said Michigan State’s close proximity to Notre Dame played a part in the high number of visitors. “That always adds to it — whenever you play Michigan or Michigan State, or even Purdue, whenever it’s a driving distance game [we tend] to have more people on campus,” he said. Seamon said special events like former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice’s appearance at the pep rally and honoring the 1966 National Championship team also contributed to the influx of excited visitors. “It’s safe to say it was a successful weekend both on and off the field,” he said. Contact Sara Felsenstein at [email protected]last_img read more

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Irish economist spurs Irish patriotism

first_imgAccording to Irish economist and author David McWilliams, one solution to Ireland’s recent economic problems may come from the Irish but not from Ireland, it would come from what he calls the “great Irish tribe.” McWilliams gave a lecture titled, “Ireland, Europe and the Irish Diaspora – Re-imagining Ireland in the 21st Century,” in the Rare Book Room of the Hesburgh Library on Friday. McWilliams said Ireland’s current economic turmoil amidst the general problems of the Eurozone requires something drastic, but he believes this solution could be provided by the people worldwide who identify themselves as Irish. “The future of Ireland needs another shock, and that’s where you come in, where the diaspora comes in,” McWilliams said. He said the possibility of enlisting the self-identified Irish in places like the United States, Canada and Australia first came to his mind due to the comment of a mentor. McWilliams said he was assigned a very experienced Israeli mentor while working for a Swiss bank in Israel. One day, this mentor said he noticed that he dealt with many ethnically Irish people when working with American companies and asked McWilliams whether or not the Irish had any mechanism for bringing these people back to Ireland. McWilliams said he hadn’t given the subject much thought before then, but he didn’t think there was any such effort. “We’ve done nothing but repel the tribe as far as I can tell,” he said. McWilliams said he has since begun working on various projects to make use of the Irish overseas and his reason for coming to Notre Dame was to propose his ideas. “[Notre Dame] is an incredibly powerful place to start these projects. Notre Dame is a huge resource for the Irish in America and a brilliant center for Irish connections. You can use Notre Dame to champion some of the ideas and feed into its network of alumni,” he said. “This could be a huge project which Notre Dame could be involved in.” McWilliams said there are three elements of his overall proposal, a program resembling the “Birthright Israel” program, allowing Irish ex-patriots to vote in national elections and reaching out to the ethnically Irish based on town records. McWilliams said during his time in Israel he learned about the birthright program, which provides free 10-day educational trips to Israel for Jewish young adults from 60 different countries. McWilliams said he is hoping to create a similar program for Irish young adults. The goal of the program is to instill a strong emotional connection with Ireland and their Irish heritage in the young adults, McWilliams said.”Emotional things that happen to you as a kid stick with you. Imagine as an American what it would mean to visit Ireland when you’re 15,” McWilliams said. McWilliams said he has seen Polish, Italian, American and other ex-patriot groups line-up to vote in their nation’s elections while living overseas. Similarly enfranchising Irish citizens who are living abroad could help to alleviate problems of provisionalism and clientalism present in current Irish politics, he said. McWilliams said those who have lived abroad for a while might have a better perspective on what is good for the Irish nation as a whole. McWilliams said he is also leading an effort to use town records and town gossips to trace the emigration stories of the world’s ethnically Irish and then reaching out to them with their own history. “We can email you, everyone’s contactable nowadays, with a Google Maps image of the specific field from which your relative emigrated from Ireland,” he said. “With tech we can bring all this together.” McWilliams said this idea that Ireland ought to do more to engage the ethnically Irish of the world, his “diaspora strategy,” was not initially as well received as it is now. He said the idea progressed through the three stages of reception from “open ridicule” to “violent opposition” to “everyone claims they were already on your side.” “The idea was fist considered risible, something to be laughed at, but now everyone has a diaspora strategy,” he said. McWilliams said this effort could be very successful because Ireland has one of the best “brand” names in the world, but it all depends on the cooperation of the Irish diaspora. “The power of the diaspora can be forged to improve the ‘product’ of Ireland, a country with the most powerful ‘brand’ in the world because every member of the diaspora is a salesperson for the ‘brand,’” he said. “We can only do this if we work together.”last_img read more

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Vets recognized for their Essex Junction brewery

first_img1st Republic Brewing Company,Vermont Business Magazine A brewing company in Essex Junction has been named the 2018 Vermont Veteran-Owned Business of the Year. Kevin Jarvis and Shawn Trout, owners of 1st Republic Brewing Company, are being recognized by the U.S. Small Business Administration for rapid growth, financial success and community involvement.Trout is an Army veteran who served in Iraq and Afghanistan and Jarvis is a Vermont National Guardsman veteran who served in Iraq. Although the two are both from Vermont and served overseas at the same time, Jarvis and Trout did not meet until 2011 when they worked at the same company.The two hit it off becoming friends and soon started homebrewing out of Jarvis’ garage in Fairfax, Vt. brewing 35-gallons a week. Today 1st Republic Brewing operates out of a 3,000 square-foot facility producing about 800 barrels of beer a year.   “When we first started thinking of starting a brewery our minds went in a million different directions, the ultimate goal was to make this a full time job which is has, so I’m very excited about that.  It’s been a huge learning experience, not only from the beer making side, but also on running a full-time operation, it has been a priceless experience so far,” said Trout.As the company has grown, the owners have stayed true to their homebrewing roots as 1st Republic Brewing Company is also the state’s largest homebrew supply shop.  The company sells everything from hops and grains to kettles and burners. Customers can visit their store in Essex Junction or shop online at www.1strepublic-homebrew.com(link is external).Active in the community, Jarvis and Trout contribute to the University of Vermont Children’s Hospital, Passion for Paws, the Travis Roy Foundation, a local wounded warrior integration organization and a local sports teams.“We’re a small business but we’re trying to make big, positive impacts within our community and state,” said Trout. “This dream of ours has only happened because of the great people in Essex Vermont and the surrounding area who stop by and enjoy a beer with us every day.  We love seeing everyone’s faces every day, and them enjoying our beer is what makes it all worth it.”The owners of 1st Republic Brewing will be presented their award during the 2018 Vermont Small Business Awards Ceremony cohosted by Vermont Business Magazine in June. The ceremony is open to the public and registration will be available in May.“Military service can translate very well to the private sector,” said Darcy Carter, SBA Vermont District Director. “Veterans were taught leadership, motivation and work ethic when they served. These qualities are necessary to be a successful entrepreneur.”In addition to Jarvis and Trout, 1st Republic Brewing has two minority owners, David Jarvis and Mike Drake, who are also veterans.For more information, visit www.1strepublicbrewingco.com(link is external).last_img read more

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